Nikon USA may have to reassess their restriction of parts for repair purposes

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Spare parts will be difficult, because most of it is proprietary.
#1 If they have to sell spare parts, they fall back on the old model of determining how many spares to produce.
#2 If they can't keep the repair to themselves, they will make their revenue on the spare parts by raising the prices.
#3 But priority for parts will be themselves. So as parts inventory gets low, they will cut sales of parts to others, to keep the limited spare parts for themselves.

If they cut #1 close, #3 will happen sooner.
 

JLH

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Jan 28, 2019
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This is "old news" in some parts of the world. In Europe they even made it a law that the companies have to supply spare parts. Here is an article from four years ago about this:

Right to repair in Europe
 
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Nov 7, 2017
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This is "old news" in some parts of the world. In Europe they even made it a law that the companies have to supply spare parts. Here is an article from four years ago about this:

Right to repair in Europe
we in the US may have fallen four years behind in many ways...:(
 
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In Europe they even made it a law that the companies have to supply spare parts.

I believe spare parts have to be available also in America for a certain number of years after a product is discontinued. However, the right to repair movement goes much farther by seeking to approve laws that require those parts, documentation and the like to be made available to third-party manufacturing companies, repair facilities and consumers.
 
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While I like the idea, I am concerned about the effect such laws may have on prices and the introduction of new products. Manufacturers may become more risk-averse, and will also need to price in future spare parts inventory requirements. Like most things, there will be trade-offs.
 
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Manufacturers may become more risk-averse, and will also need to price in future spare parts inventory requirements. Like most things, there will be trade-offs.

They generally make a higher percentage of profit on the parts than the fully assembled product so I don't understand why this change in itself would make a company become more averse to risk or create a need to adjust pricing of the assembled product.

The spare parts and service charges for repairs are so profitable that the manufacturers want to keep those profits for themselves rather than allow third-party repair facilities and consumers to make the repairs. I suppose it could be argued that if enough right-to-repair laws are enacted, companies will generate lower profits from the spare parts and repairs and that those lower profits could hurt the companies' ability to do the research and development required to bring out new products. However, neither that argument nor the argument against it can ever be proved.
 
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As I recall, the right to repair movement here began with farmers who have had a long tradition, and need, to be able their equipment fast and in the middle of nowhere. In mechanical days that was easy, but as software started to infiltrate farm equipment manufacturers and their suppliers, worried about proprietary solutions being stolen and corrupted, made farmers sign agreements to not touch the equipment.
 

JLH

Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
278
In the auto industry spare parts are a large money machine. Once you tool up to build a part the unit cost goes down with the number built. Yes, there is some overhead in the stocking of parts but the profit margins are normally quite good. There are many laws covering parts support for vehicles and this impacts the industry. A company may drop a model that doesn't sell well as the cost of maintaining the fleet with parts is just not profitable. As for other products, no such laws currently exist as far as I know. An example was a friend of my wife's who bought a very expensive Baby Lock sewing machine (as in several thousands of dollars). That model had endless problems and after a year or two the company dropped it. They ended all support and no parts were readily available and no service work would be done by the very dealer who sold it to her. Seems there is no law for such things outside the transpiration industry which is very heavily regulated. This is why the new "Right to repair" laws are so important, they will require spare parts be made available. Of course pricing will kill a lot of repairs. My wife broke the door handle off our microwave. Its a simple, one piece molded plastic part. Price: $75 !!!. We bought a new microwave! Often times replacement parts can be had but they are so expensive its not worth buying them. So, even if laws are passed they will have no control over prices of these parts, and you know what happens next.........$$$$$$$$
 

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