Nikon Z 7II pricing....

Joined
Feb 12, 2006
Messages
1,354
Location
England
Real Name
Leif
I have to say that, because it's the way things appear to be going, if I was to consider switching to mirrorless myself, I would not stop at Nikon. Native lenses, without adaptors, would be my preference and, if I had to / wanted to change my Nikon lenses as well as my camera/s, I would look at everything else too. Nothing to lose. Canon would certainly be in my reckoning and so, actually, would Leica L mount. Sony might be top of the tree. I would spend a bit of time in a camera shop. In my case I suspect I might not come out with a mirrorless Nikon.

Me - I'd be happy with a D780 with IBIS and a bigger viewfinder with a proper VF light block. And I wouldn't need video.
I’m moving over to mirrorless, the D600 is sold, the D500 will be sold, several F mount lenses will go, the 300mm F4 AFS lens has gone. As you say, it is sensible to consider all three mirrorless systems.

Canon does not appeal to me because they must don’t have anything to compare to the Nikon F4 zooms, and F1.8 primes, and the macro lenses are costly. A Canon system would end up very expensive.

Sony does not appeal due to the ergonomics.

Nikon does appeal because the egonomics are good, and the lens range is exceptional, for my purposes anyway. The 24-70mm F4 zoom is an ideal high IQ travel lens, the 105mm F2.8 micro is superb, so I’m sorted. And the standard F2.8 zooms are optically superb, if I ever win the lottery.

I’m sure someone else would come to a different conclusion.
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
I have to say that, because it's the way things appear to be going, if I was to consider switching to mirrorless myself, I would not stop at Nikon. Native lenses, without adaptors, would be my preference and, if I had to / wanted to change my Nikon lenses as well as my camera/s, I would look at everything else too. Nothing to lose. Canon would certainly be in my reckoning and so, actually, would Leica L mount. Sony might be top of the tree. I would spend a bit of time in a camera shop. In my case I suspect I might not come out with a mirrorless Nikon.

Me - I'd be happy with a D780 with IBIS and a bigger viewfinder with a proper VF light block. And I wouldn't need video.
A dear friend is an international tour leader, teaching pro and one of Canon's Photographers of Light. Several friends have Sony. Each system has its strong points and weaknesses. And mirrorless technology is also still advancing.....such as black out times, etc. Sony is out in front now - but mainly for sports and wildlife.....and the gap is narrowing quickly. Canon's and Nikon's next gens might be the best option for me regarding wildlife. I'd prefer not to own Sony. Heart and ergonomics are with Nikon.

Truth be told, I LOVE my current gear! D5 and D850 and great lenses from 15mm to 600mm (prime).

I am considering the Z7II strictly as a travel, architecture, macro, landscape camera. No reason to swap out the D5 and long lenses for my wildlife work yet.
 
It's been nearly two years ago now since I made the big switch in systems and of course both camera body and native lens options were a little more limited than they are now in terms of what Nikon (or Canon) had to offer, which was one of the factors which definitely guided me in the direction that I chose to go, given my preference for native lenses and especially particular lenses which would serve me well in the kinds of shooting which I like to do. I was not concerned with whether or not Sony was popular or "out in front," a "leader of the pack," whatever -- the decision I made at that time had to do with the fact that they actually had available the gear which I had decided would work best for me in my move to mirrorless technology. I love my current gear and indeed it has proven to be well-suited to my needs. Everyone has his or her own priorities and in the end that is what is most important.....
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
It's been nearly two years ago now since I made the big switch in systems and of course both camera body and native lens options were a little more limited than they are now in terms of what Nikon (or Canon) had to offer, which was one of the factors which definitely guided me in the direction that I chose to go, given my preference for native lenses and especially particular lenses which would serve me well in the kinds of shooting which I like to do. I was not concerned with whether or not Sony was popular or "out in front," a "leader of the pack," whatever -- the decision I made at that time had to do with the fact that they actually had available the gear which I had decided would work best for me in my move to mirrorless technology. I love my current gear and indeed it has proven to be well-suited to my needs. Everyone has his or her own priorities and in the end that is what is most important.....
I don't think anyone questions your decision for you almost 2 years ago. We are discussing our options for us today for our types of photography....specifically the Nikon Z7 II.
 
I am aware of that but was mentioning my experience from nearly two years ago because the reality is that things haven't changed that much, there ARE other options and for some people those options may be important.....and in fact others have mentioned them in this very thread. Whether or not someone chooses to explore them is of course up to that person who is contemplating making a change or addition to his or her photographic gear.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
25,502
Location
Orland Park, Illinois
I think the choice of systems is different for everyone. I seriously considered making the move to Sony at one point, but my investment in Nikon lenses has always made me hesitate. Once Nikon introduced the FTZ adapter—which allows me to make a much more gradual transition to mirrorless—I decided to stick with Nikon. I suspect that the Z9 will be an outstanding camera. The camera manufacturers tend to leap frog one another over time…I just try to be patient and stick with the one. But everyone’s situation differs.

Glenn
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
1,793
Location
Melbourne - Australia
I agree with Glenn, I have found no one brand of camera suits my variety of genres. Over the years I have invested into 3 different systems. Sure they are basically duplicated when it comes to general photography, but when it comes to focus stacking/bracketing and HDR they each have their strengths and is why I use bodies other than Nikon. While Nikon is my biggest investment in bodies and lenses, it is also my least used other than for birding. I'm not sure why Nikon likes to make life difficult for users when it comes to bracketing photography.
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
21,692
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
I'm not sure why Nikon likes to make life difficult for users when it comes to bracketing photography.

If you think that's odd, just imagine why Sony likes to make life so difficult for users when it comes to making focus-bracketed photos. (For those that aren't aware, it can't be done without using a third-party device.)
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
1,793
Location
Melbourne - Australia
If you think that's odd, just imagine why Sony likes to make so difficult for users when it comes to making focus-bracketed photos. (For those that aren't aware, it can't be done without using a third-party device.)

Which is why I don't use Sony. However, its not only focus bracketing where Nikon likes to make life difficult, its also the other bracketing modes.
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
Which is why I don't use Sony. However, its not only focus bracketing where Nikon likes to make life difficult, its also the other bracketing modes.
I use exposure bracketing frequently and find it very easy with Nikon..... What am I missing?
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
1,793
Location
Melbourne - Australia
I use exposure bracketing frequently and find it very easy with Nikon..... What am I missing?

From my limited experience using both f and Z bodies, it is the requirement to use the menu system for activation/deactivation, fixed exposure options i.e. if you use under/over you get both, which I know you can tweak with EV adjustments, and you need to hold the shutter down until all images are taken. Other bodies I use allow a programable button to activate (obviously requires the settings to be set previously), allow say -3, -2, -1, 0, or if you require + you can add them, and by the number you want. The big plus for me is, one press of the shutter remote and all images are taken automatically. It is these small quirks, which most of the time frustrate me in the field. At home I have no issues making changes via the menu system. As Glenn commented, choice of systems is different for everyone.
I was happy for many years using Nikon bodies for all my photography. It was when I got into photographing Native Orchids that I found the system lacking for my needs. This sent me on a path to look for other options. It was my exposure to first Fuji, then Olympus when I saw how other brands make life a little simpler for the user. These days I tend to use Fuji and Olympus more than my Nikons, except for birding, although the Olympus is no slouch for birding, I don't have nice long glass to go with it and not interested in purchasing any as its main function is for macro work in the field.
One thing I do enjoy using my Z bodies for is the ghost fungi. The multiple long exposures I do tend to cause more hot pixels on f bodies, and both Fuji and Olympus bodies I have as well. I'm looking forward to using the Z fc next season, particularly with its exposure time up to 900sec.

EDIT: added link to ghost fungi thread for those who are not sure what I'm talking about.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
4,723
Location
Westmorland UK
A dear friend is an international tour leader, teaching pro and one of Canon's Photographers of Light. Several friends have Sony. Each system has its strong points and weaknesses. And mirrorless technology is also still advancing.....such as black out times, etc. Sony is out in front now - but mainly for sports and wildlife.....and the gap is narrowing quickly. Canon's and Nikon's next gens might be the best option for me regarding wildlife. I'd prefer not to own Sony. Heart and ergonomics are with Nikon.

Truth be told, I LOVE my current gear! D5 and D850 and great lenses from 15mm to 600mm (prime).

I am considering the Z7II strictly as a travel, architecture, macro, landscape camera. No reason to swap out the D5 and long lenses for my wildlife work yet.

I understand completely. I'm in no hurry to switch from my D750 and D500. And a Fuji X100V. I could add a Q2 Monochrom though!
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
From my limited experience using both f and Z bodies, it is the requirement to use the menu system for activation/deactivation, fixed exposure options i.e. if you use under/over you get both, which I know you can tweak with EV adjustments, and you need to hold the shutter down until all images are taken. Other bodies I use allow a programable button to activate (obviously requires the settings to be set previously), allow say -3, -2, -1, 0, or if you require + you can add them, and by the number you want. The big plus for me is, one press of the shutter remote and all images are taken automatically. It is these small quirks, which most of the time frustrate me in the field. At home I have no issues making changes via the menu system. As Glenn commented, choice of systems is different for everyone.
I was happy for many years using Nikon bodies for all my photography. It was when I got into photographing Native Orchids that I found the system lacking for my needs. This sent me on a path to look for other options. It was my exposure to first Fuji, then Olympus when I saw how other brands make life a little simpler for the user. These days I tend to use Fuji and Olympus more than my Nikons, except for birding, although the Olympus is no slouch for birding, I don't have nice long glass to go with it and not interested in purchasing any as its main function is for macro work in the field.
One thing I do enjoy using my Z bodies for is the ghost fungi. The multiple long exposures I do tend to cause more hot pixels on f bodies, and both Fuji and Olympus bodies I have as well. I'm looking forward to using the Z fc next season, particularly with its exposure time up to 900sec.

EDIT: added link to ghost fungi thread for those who are not sure what I'm talking about.
With both my D850 and D5, I take whatever number of bracketed images I have selected with 1 push of the shutter button. The cameras have a bracket setting at the top....a button on the D850 and a mode setting on the D5 AIR. The only thing I have to do is have the mode set to timer (having pre-selected in the menu the number of shots to be taken). Since I am generally taking bracketed photos when doing interior architecture, I have the camera all set up before entering the building.

Once inside the building, the only thing I need to do is decide on a composition, use live view's red overlay to verify focusing, and push the shutter once to take 3, 5, 7 or 9 bracketed exposures. Then move on to the next shot.
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
Are you bracketing multiple exposures for HDR, or just to be sure you get a proper exposure?
Normally I shoot manual and adjust exposure before shooting using the histogram. When shooting interiors, however, there is often an extremely wide dynamic range from poorly lit areas to light streaming through stained glass or clear windows....or interior lighting.
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
24,757
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
I forgot about the live view histogram on the D850. I discovered that on my D750 shortly before I sold it. The nice thing about the Z cameras is that you get that histogram in the viewfinder.
When I'm shooting wildlife or landscapes, I don't use LV. Once a location/subject is identified, I take a quick photo and using image review check the histogram. Once I dial in exposure, I only need to change it when the lighting changes. I use exposure compensation for many adjustments.
 

Latest threads

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom