Nikon Z7's Superb Color Rendition

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Nov 3, 2018
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A rich color rendition of the Z7 is amazing. I went to a poppy field and took this shot this morning. Recent rain here in southern California produced an explosion of wild flowers. I took a few hundred shots. This one is one of better ones. Straight from JPEG fine, 46MP FX. I am also impressed how accurately the Z7 renders the exposure, even with a non-Nikon, non-CPU lens. This shot was made by a Voigtlander 10mm F5.6 utra-wide lens. I used F8, ISO64. Nikon Z7's exposure is accurate and correct 95% of the time with the aperture-priority (A mode) even with the manual third-party lens like this one, and even with the SUN IN THE FRAME. I did not have time to worry about the exposure during the shooting; all my energy was used to compose and focus this lens using the tilt rear monitor. And yet, the exposure is pretty much perfect. (I used Matrix mode.) Again, this is JPEG straight from the camera. (The other JPEG shot is also by the same 10mm, a family enjoying a drone photo shoot.)

Just one more thing about the mirrorless' EVF: It is safe to look at the sun in the EVF, for the highest brightness is 255 (out of 0-255). The sensor just cannot go beyond that. In the glass prism finder, however, the photographer can permanently damage the eyesight.
 
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Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
146
Thank you for the kind words!

Just one little thing I forgot to mention about my poppy shot. I violated my own suggestion I wrote elsewhere....
The "sun star" has 10 streaks emanating from the sun. This is due to the 10-blade aperture of the Voigtlander 10mm lens. The Nikkor lenses have an odd-number aperture blades (like 7 or 9) which produce twice as many streak lines from the sun, like 14 and 18. If you look at my shot carefully, my sunstar has one extra vertical line at the bottom of the sun. This is due to the same diffraction of light as in the aperture blades, but this one is caused by the horizontal edge of the vertically-traversing shutter curtain of the Z's mechanical focal-plane shutter. All I should have done is to use the silent shutter instead to avoid this extra streak when shooting into the sun....
 
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Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
146
As far as the sensor technology is concerned, there is no difference between DSLR and mirrorless; both are digital cameras. I do not see why there should be any difference in image quality.

But one thing I can say about this "sun" shot is that this really and clearly demonstrates the tremendous benefit of the mirrorless EVF finder. I did some shooting into the sun in the past using a DSLR but assessing the final image in the finder was so difficult (not to mention being dangerous to your eye if you gaze the finder for a long time). With the EVF, you are constantly looking at the image that you are going to get BEFORE clicking the shutter.
 
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