Critique No I won't back down

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I'm curious to see what you guys think of this picture. I think took it a few months back with my Nikon D7100 using a Tamron 90mm 2.8.

For some reason some people love the B&W version and others like it much more in color. I don't know if it's because I've edited it in a bad way or that's it's merely on how the speaks to some people.


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I think the reason the people that prefer the B&W version do so is because so much of the color version has blue tones. The result is that the monochrome version actually has more tonal variation in that sense.

I'm going to go against the crowd here regarding the globes. That's mostly because they show the subject's environment almost as if the photo is an environmental portrait. It's a strong statement for me that they are standing tall and the subject is doing his best to do the same despite the challenges he must overcome to do so. If you crop to remove the globes, you'll lose that element, which for me is very powerful.

About the notion that the bright tones distract: That's really only a stylistic consideration that happens to be in style these days in a very strong way. If you review famous portrait photographers of times gone by, you'll realize that they used bright areas of the image to add drama or because they simply didn't care whereas today they would be criticized for including those areas because they distract. Examples include photographers from previous centuries such as Julia Margaret Cameron and Edward Steichen but also more recent photographers such as Avedon and even current photographer Annie Liebovitz, though probably to a lesser degree. My point is to make photos the way you want for whatever reasons you want, not because a particular style might or might not be in vogue these days.
 
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Butlerkid

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I think the reason the people that prefer the B&W version do so is because so much of the color version has blue tones. The result is that the monochrome version actually has more tonal variation in that sense.

I'm going to go against the crowd here regarding the globes, mostly because they show the subject's environment almost as if the photo is an environmental portrait. It's a strong statement for me that they are standing tall and the subject is doing his best to do the same despite the challenges he must overcome to do so.

About the notion that the bright tones distract: That's really only a stylistic consideration that happens to be in style these days in a very strong way. If you review famous portrait photographers of times gone by, you'll realize that they used bright areas of the image to add drama or because they simply didn't care whereas today they would be criticized for including those areas because they distract. Examples include photographers from previous centuries such as Julia Margaret Cameron and Edward Steichen but also more recent photographers such as Avedon and even current photographer Annie Liebovitz, though probably to a lesser degree. My point is to make photos the way you want for whatever reason you want, not because a particular style might or might not be in vogue these days.
IMHO, it is not about style so much as it is about how the human eye examines things in front of it. The comment was "The eye goes to white...." Scientifically, the eye gravitates to the brightest part of the image. It will then roam around the image, but come back to the brightest area. Nothing was said about this being good or bad. It is simply a consideration in how an image will be viewed.
 
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Scientifically, the eye gravitates to the brightest part of the image. It will then roam around the image, but come back to the brightest area.
I've never seen any scientific, empirical evidence that this is true. To assume this is true is to also assume that the eye can't be trained, which doesn't pass the test of common sense for me.
 
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Based on the OP's title, the person and his expression is assumed to the subject matter....not the lamp posts...
I agree. Where we apparently disagree is your contention that nothing was said about the brightness of the globes being good or bad and your contention that the bright globes weaken the photo. It's no big deal to me that we disagree.
 
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B&W definitely! Crop out or darken the globes, as they ARE distracting.

I'm wondering what the guy was thinking, why that expression on his face.....was there actually a confrontation going on? Maybe he was just pausing to take a break if walking is an effort for him? Mmmmm...was this man aware that you were taking his photo?
Yeahup he was walking at a slow pace and stood for a few seconds basking in the sun before he moved on.

I was sitting waiting for a friend as I snapped that together with these from the same spot.

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