1. Welcome to NikonCafe.com—a friendly Nikon camera & photography discussion forum!

    If you are thinking of buying a camera or need help with your photos, you will find our forum members full of advice! Click here to join for free!

NX2: Inconsistant pasting of WB settings

Discussion in 'Nikon Capture and View NX' started by StL_Don, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. I've got a bunch of shots all taken under the same lighting.
    I've saved a set of adjustments which include a set grey point. When I load the set I get a different WB for every image.
    All shot with the same camera (I've run into this with NC and different cameras).

    Saved value 1.06/85
    Heres examples of the red/blue numbers after loading.
    1.07/.87
    1.11/.82
    1.13/.81
    1.21/.75 (this one really looked awful)

    Am I doing something wrong? :confused: 
    I expect the saved figures to be loaded exactly as saved each time,
    not with NX2 doing some calculations/adjustments with each load.

    Now if somehow NX2 was fine tuning things to make each image look the same... that would be cool. But it's not.
    Each paste gives images a different look thus foiling my plan for consistency.

    What's the point of being able to save a WB setting with this system?

    Thanks for your help.

    Don
     
  2. bh626

    bh626

    280
    Mar 6, 2006
    Ontario
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  3. I don't think you can do this. You can set wb temperatures. I could be wrong, but that is the way I do it all the time and have no problems with batching.
     
  4. Thanks for clearing this up.
    Looks like the staff of the "find ways to aggrivate Don" department at NIK have done another bang up job.

    Don
     
  5. Make sure wb is not set to auto. Even under the same lighting different subject colors will record differently as the camera attempts to make sense of the reflected light. I think that the differences may be due to different starting points!
    If you use only daylight sunshine on the shoot for instance, then the batch results should be the same.
    Try it out.

    David
     
  6. Tom,

    I believe the question was: Why do pasted gray point values change from the saved value?
    Using a fixed white balance gives the same pasted values on shots with that wb. With other wb's the values will change. I agree the auto wb does a good job.

    David
     
  7. jgatscher

    jgatscher

    19
    Jul 29, 2008
    Nashville
    I have found that when using Auto WB and then trying to apply a grey card adjustment to a bunch of photos does not work....So I make sure that I set WB to flash for instance (shooting studio work) and then take a grey card shot....in post I can use the grey card shot to set a new WB and then paste that setting into the rest of the photos that are similar in lighting setup....the results are very consistent with only minor deviation in red/blue values....so for me when I know that I'm using a grey card I switch off Auto WB and set it to an appropriate manual setting, then shoot a grey and paste into the rest....works fine in that mode.
     
  8. DrJay32

    DrJay32

    254
    Oct 14, 2006
    Colorado, USA
    Tom-
    The effect you describe shouldn't happen with the WB (gray point) adjustment in Develop. It WILL happen if you are using a gray control point, though. You should be able to copy/paste custom WB settings between images, but the VALUES will indeed differ depending on what the in-camera WB was set to originally.

    -Jason
     
  9. Thanks all for the information.
    It is appearing to me that the grey point WB is relative vs. absolute and is all but useless for pasting if the camera has
    been set to auto WB.
    An example of the relativeness (to make up a word) is when I open a shot that is grossly off on WB the set grey point dialog begins at 1/1.
    A shot which is very close to correct WB also opens with 1/1.

    This is a deviation from what most other RAW processors do which is to initially show you the absolute WB settings.

    As far as I'm concerned this potentially valuable tool has been rendered all but useless by the fine folks at NIK.

    Don
     
  10. Did someone already asked Nikon support about that? I would argue that this is a bug and that pasting of an absolute WB should be possible.
    I may ask Nikon Germany about that but I think it would be best if anyone who is bothered with that asks Nikon for themselves.
     
  11. I was referring to WB as a set of red/blue multiplication factors. And as such, they should exist and should be able to apply in an absolute, non relative way.
    This should also be possible not only by pasting colour tempatures but also by pasting red/blue multiplication factors, regardless of the WB setting saved together with the NEF. From my understanding of this thread, the latter doesn't seem to be the case. If so, I consider this a bug, be it by design or by implementation.
     
  12. Er.. but, given the same camera with its inherent native colour temperature where red/blue factors are 1.0, what's the difference of applying a color temperature to an image (e.g. 5200k) or its corresponding r/b factors?

    My thinking was as follows: Regardless of how I determine the red/blue factors - by choosing a colour temperature (which is then translated to red/blue factors) or by using colour pickers or by playing with red/blue factors by hand - in the end I come up with red/blue factors that are applied to the raw data.

    Exactly those factors which are applied direclty to the raw data, which are completely independant of the WB tagged to the raw data (auto measured or preselected), exactly those factors I want to be able to copy and paste to different pictures.
    (And in my experience, other raw converters I've worked with work this way.)
    And in particular, I want NX (or any other raw convertor) to behave that way when I copy and paste WB settings, regardless of how the WB selection was made (colour temp setting, r/b factors, grey point picking).

    My understanding from this thread's beginning was that NX does not behave that way if not using colour temperatures as WB setting. Maybe I'm wrong here.
     
  13. I may be wildly off base, but my understanding of Jason Odell's post was to say that you can, in fact, use a whibal card and set the WB for an image and successfully batch or paste that setting into other photographs giving the same WB for each photo. I also hear him saying that it works as intended. That is certainly my experience.

    As I understand it, the fact that the values of R and B are slightly different is due to different WB starting points (like when Auto WB is on, or the sensor is slightly hotter, or the sun goes behind a thin cloud, or there is a color cast from a reflection, or whatever) and therefore the adjustment is slightly different to bring each photo to the same WB.

    If NX2 were simply using the location of the point or marquis you used to set WB with the set grey point function, you would get wildly different values for each photo.

    This idea seems to be entirely testable. Use a whibal card to set WB and in subsequent shots put a yellow cloth or whatever where the card was then paste the WB from the first photo into the other and see if NX2 is really sampling from the location. I would bet it is not.

    I have another question. In a studio setting with more controlled conditions, does pasting one WB into a number of shots yield close numbers? I would bet it does.

    So the question is, are the variations due to random factors in each photo being brought into alignment with the master WB?
     
  14. Hi Keith,

    You are on base. I have done the tests you suggested (for my own peace of mind) using a macbeth coor checker and covering the colored patches with blue, red and yellow sheets. Shots auto, incandescent and direct sunlight. Although lighting was not controled, it was steady and the results prove, to me, what you suggested.

    For me white balance batching/ pasting is possible in nx.
    Regards, David.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.