NY Times article on the changing business of photography. (merged)

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Dec 3, 2007
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Seeing the tide change in the ways mentioned was why I decided not to get a formal education in photography in 2000. And now for some reason, I am trying to get into this shrinking market.

It is sad that it is going the way it is, that cost has become so much more important than quality.
 
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This is bound to stir up another debate …






You all must know my position concerning this issue anyway :wink:
 
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> This is no different in most professions...

Yes it is. Think medicine, dentistry, engineering, accountancy, etc. There is a required educational track and often a licensing body.

(I'm glad I don't have to make a living with photography.)
 
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This is bound to stir up another debate …






You all must know my position concerning this issue anyway :wink:
For those of us who are newer to the cafe... what is your position?

Or is there a link from a previous debate about this? I'm genuinely curious.
 
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Fox Lake, Il.
> This is no different in most professions...

Yes it is. Think medicine, dentistry, engineering, accountancy, etc. There is a required educational track and often a licensing body.

(I'm glad I don't have to make a living with photography.)
Difference is, most of those deal with life or death, or finance. Thus the added educational requirement, precise skills and licensing.

Now photography is also a precise skill at certain levels as well. But a hack in photography will only ruin a picture, not a life. :)
 
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You're absolutely right. Book publishing went the same way beginning about 10 years ago.
Yea, and try being a musician these days. You have to pay to have your CDs manufactured and then try to sell them. The days of big recording contracts are long over.

Carole
 
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I think this is just another example of how technology is changing the marketplace. It's not only affecting photography, as many other industries have felt it as well. With the capabilities of entry-level DSLR, there will be many more photographers entering the field. Although I have done some paid sessions, this is one reason why it will always be a hobby for me and not a career.

As Carole as mentioned, technology has affected the music industry as CD's are pretty much obsolete and it's all digital downloads now. Look at the movie industry, I remember when VHS tapes used to sell for close to $100 for a new release. Then DVD's were $30 when first released. Now, you can get blu-rays for $10 - and will soon be replaced with digital streaming. Print media will pretty much be gone too. Why would I spend $30/month on a subscription to the WSJ when I can access their web articles for $10/month, which gets updated regularly while print newspapers are all yesterday's news?
 
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> this is no different in most professions...

Yes it is. Think medicine, dentistry, engineering, accountancy, etc. There is a required educational track and often a licensing body.

(i'm glad i don't have to make a living with photography.)
+1000
 
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A lot of professions are suffering the same fate, not just photographers. In the Car Stereo business, system installers are losing jobs left and right because everyone can install their own stereos and alarms these days--- simply by just looking at the diagrams online. Not only that, the local car stereo stores are being wiped out due to poor sales. People would rather buy from ebay or amazon and install stuff themselves.
 
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