Observations from Yellowstone Park May 2021

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May 5, 2005
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Idaho
Last week we spent two days in Yellowstone National Park. It seems that a high percentage of people on the hiking trails and geothermal features are carrying cameras. There are also many who have cell phones they are using for photos. As I walk about I like to look at what brand people have hanging around their necks. I saw a lot of Nikon and Canon cameras. I only saw a couple of Sony cameras. A lot of the cameras were entry level models such as a D5600. I saw several Z cameras. If what I saw in the park is indicative of the general population Nikon is still very popular. Although this time of year there are a lot of senior citizens out traveling since most kids are still in school. It's always fun to see what people are using.
 
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Dec 3, 2012
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Sandpoint, Idaho
Our last trip was the third week of October, light snow was falling and I had the ridiculous idea it might not be crowded. The “camera” scene was a selfie stick convention, saw no cameras other than what looked like I guessed were those GoPro things, little black boxes on the ends of selfie sticks. Everyone had one. Big buses would disgorge hoards of foreign tourists who would immediately gather around someone with a small flag, extend their sticks in unison and begin recording every epic step they took toward a geologic point of interest. There were so many of them milling around Old Faithful that I drove in, turned around and drove out. Worst thing I saw was the mob gathered around a bison, they were taking turns at getting up next to the poor animals head and snapping a selfie. I hoped a ranger would come by and cite the buses that barely pulled off the road for the bison attraction. The park should contract with Disney to whip up some animatronic animals that people could use for photos. They could have the usual bison and bears, but also add hippos, crocodiles, elephants, land sharks and even toss in a few dinosaurs.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
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994
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MN, USA
Last week we spent two days in Yellowstone National Park. It seems that a high percentage of people on the hiking trails and geothermal features are carrying cameras. There are also many who have cell phones they are using for photos. As I walk about I like to look at what brand people have hanging around their necks. I saw a lot of Nikon and Canon cameras. I only saw a couple of Sony cameras. A lot of the cameras were entry level models such as a D5600. I saw several Z cameras. If what I saw in the park is indicative of the general population Nikon is still very popular. Although this time of year there are a lot of senior citizens out traveling since most kids are still in school. It's always fun to see what people are using.
I suspect this is very location dependent. When we travel to cities - even destination ones like San Francisco, Seattle, Paris - I very rarely see anything more than phones and P&S Sonys or Canons. On the Canadian train a couple years ago I think I was the only one with a DSLR. I mostly see teens with DX variants if they have a camera at all, otherwise phones rule.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
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Winter Haven, florida
That is exactly why I go to yellowstone in Jan or Feb. I have seen -25F, plus wind. Lots of wildlife. The geysers are still there.
Mobs of people are not.
I was up photographing at the Alligator Farm in St Augustine, Fl earlier this week. Lots of photographers. It was pretty evenly split between nikon, canon, sony.
gary
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
22,023
Location
Idaho
Our last trip was the third week of October, light snow was falling and I had the ridiculous idea it might not be crowded. The “camera” scene was a selfie stick convention, saw no cameras other than what looked like I guessed were those GoPro things, little black boxes on the ends of selfie sticks. Everyone had one. Big buses would disgorge hoards of foreign tourists who would immediately gather around someone with a small flag, extend their sticks in unison and begin recording every epic step they took toward a geologic point of interest. There were so many of them milling around Old Faithful that I drove in, turned around and drove out. Worst thing I saw was the mob gathered around a bison, they were taking turns at getting up next to the poor animals head and snapping a selfie. I hoped a ranger would come by and cite the buses that barely pulled off the road for the bison attraction. The park should contract with Disney to whip up some animatronic animals that people could use for photos. They could have the usual bison and bears, but also add hippos, crocodiles, elephants, land sharks and even toss in a few dinosaurs.
Funny!!
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
22,023
Location
Idaho
I suspect this is very location dependent. When we travel to cities - even destination ones like San Francisco, Seattle, Paris - I very rarely see anything more than phones and P&S Sonys or Canons. On the Canadian train a couple years ago I think I was the only one with a DSLR. I mostly see teens with DX variants if they have a camera at all, otherwise phones rule.
It probably is location dependent. I was really surprised how many DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras we saw last week.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
22,023
Location
Idaho
That is exactly why I go to yellowstone in Jan or Feb. I have seen -25F, plus wind. Lots of wildlife. The geysers are still there.
Mobs of people are not.
I was up photographing at the Alligator Farm in St Augustine, Fl earlier this week. Lots of photographers. It was pretty evenly split between nikon, canon, sony.
gary
Do you go on a snowcoach in Jan or Feb? We had a very bad snowcoach experience and haven't been back to try it again.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
Messages
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Location
Winter Haven, florida
Do you go on a snowcoach in Jan or Feb?
They changed the rules several years ago- probably for the best.
My understanding is now you must use a guide. Snowcoaches and snow mobiles have to stay on the roads. You can hike as far off the road/trail as you want, but the vehicle stays on the road.
I guess I have been lucky, never had a bad experience with any of the snow vehicles. Since they can only go on the road, we now use the coaches. I'm getting old and lazy, and the coaches are heated!
gary
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
22,023
Location
Idaho
They changed the rules several years ago- probably for the best.
My understanding is now you must use a guide. Snowcoaches and snow mobiles have to stay on the roads. You can hike as far off the road/trail as you want, but the vehicle stays on the road.
I guess I have been lucky, never had a bad experience with any of the snow vehicles. Since they can only go on the road, we now use the coaches. I'm getting old and lazy, and the coaches are heated!
gary
Our snowcoach broke down. We had some very annoying people in our group who showed up in shorts and tennis shoes, and the new coach they brought us was old and didn't heat up well. It was just a bad experience all around, except that our guide was excellent.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
22,023
Location
Idaho

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