Omega aka Messier 17

Joined
Oct 4, 2006
Messages
2,293
Location
Chicago, IL
Here is my take on M17, also known as the Omega Nebula (or Swan Nebula, Checkmark Nebula, and Horseshoe Nebula) is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter in the Sagittarius Arm of the Milky Way. The Omega Nebula was discovered in 1745 by the Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux. Like many nebulae, this giant cosmic cloud of interstellar matter is a star forming region in the Sagittarius. It is estimated to be about 1 million years old (what a birthday cake…) The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 x the mass of our sun.

The Omega Nebula is just on the limit of naked eye detection in good conditions, with clear, dark skies and no light pollution. You can observe it in low-powered telescopes and binoculars.

This was taken on the night of September 27 and consists of 15 x 240 second exposures and supporting files.

Thanks for looking!

M17_2021-09-27 small.png
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
4,708
Location
Westmorland UK
Here is my take on M17, also known as the Omega Nebula (or Swan Nebula, Checkmark Nebula, and Horseshoe Nebula) is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter in the Sagittarius Arm of the Milky Way. The Omega Nebula was discovered in 1745 by the Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux. Like many nebulae, this giant cosmic cloud of interstellar matter is a star forming region in the Sagittarius. It is estimated to be about 1 million years old (what a birthday cake…) The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 x the mass of our sun.

The Omega Nebula is just on the limit of naked eye detection in good conditions, with clear, dark skies and no light pollution. You can observe it in low-powered telescopes and binoculars.

This was taken on the night of September 27 and consists of 15 x 240 second exposures and supporting files.

Thanks for looking!

View attachment 1690117
Amazing and beautiful work that you do Kevin.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2006
Messages
2,293
Location
Chicago, IL
The astro-master strikes again...

Simply wonderful Kevin.

Kind regards
Klaus

Thanks so much! Just so you know, they don't always work...lol. Nothing like spending a couple of hours in the dark gathering frames, then an hour or so processing the image.... only to go ... poop.... and trash them all. But, it is like cocaine - the more you do the more you want to do.... :)

Superb! I love seeing your images!

Thanks - always enjoy sharing in the hopes of infecting someone ... ;)

Amazing and beautiful work that you do Kevin.

Thanks so much!
 

Latest threads

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom