Orland Park Village Hall

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Another one from yesterday with the new Nikon Z7ii...this time with the 24-70 2.8 S lens.

This is Village Hall in Orland Park...a southwest suburb of Chicago, Illinois:

2021-04-22 orland-68.jpg
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Thanks again for looking...
Glenn

On a side note, I tried Focus Shifting for the first time. I've always done it manually until now. I set the number of shots to 9, the focus step width to 4...and the camera stopped after 6 exposures--which I figured was good since it reached infinity in fewer than the 9 shots. However, when reviewing the images I noticed that only 2 were in focus. The first one captured the grass in the front in focus and the second rendered the buildings sharp. The third, fourth, fifth and sixth images were out of focus...and I am assuming that the focus point shifted past the buildings at that point. So, I focus stacked with just the first two images. I was surprised that it didn't take more than 2 exposures, but perhaps I could have used a wider aperture or a narrow focus step if I wanted more exposures. Any thoughts?
 

NCV

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A superb rendering of this building.

It reminds me of some of the Italian Rationalism buildings of the twenties and thirties here in Italy
 
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Nice image with plenty of foreground interest that also conveys the buildings' environment.

I was surprised that it didn't take more than 2 exposures, but perhaps I could have used a wider aperture or a narrow focus step if I wanted more exposures. Any thoughts?

I'm surprised that you couldn't have made the image using just one exposure, so I'm not surprised that only two exposures were needed to keep everything sharp.

You mentioned that the last four exposures in your sequence of captured images were out of focus. Were the clouds also out of focus? I mention this because the clouds seem sharp to me in your image, which clearly indicates that there was no need for the last four captures. If the clouds were in focus in those last four captures, the focus shifting was focusing on them. If everything in the last four captures was out of focus, it's probably because the auto focus point was on the plain blue part of the sky with insufficient contrast to allow the auto focus to work properly.
 
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Nice image with plenty of foreground interest that also conveys the buildings' environment.



I'm surprised that you couldn't have made the image using just one exposure, so I'm not surprised that only two exposures were needed to keep everything sharp.

You mentioned that the last four exposures in your sequence of captured images were out of focus. Were the clouds also out of focus? I mention this because the clouds seem sharp to me in your image, which clearly indicates that there was no need for the last four captures. If the clouds were in focus in those last four captures, the focus shifting was focusing on them. If everything in the last four captures were out of focus, it's probably because the auto focus point was on the plain blue part of the sky with insufficient contrast to allow the auto focus to work properly.
Interesting...I wasn’t sure how the focus point moves through the scene. My starting focus point was on the grass in the foreground.

The clouds appeared to be in focus in my second shot so I deleted the last four frames.

Glenn
 
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I wasn’t sure how the focus point moves through the scene.

Until Nikon explains how the focus point moves through the scene during focus shifting, it's probably not possible for any of us to know how that happens. When combining focus shifting with tabletop photography and especially macro photography, I've noticed a couple times that nothing in a particular capture was in focus even though the captures made before and after displayed parts of the scene sharply in focus. It seemed reasonable to me that the only explanation of the completely out-of-focus capture was that the auto focus point landed on a part of the scene that lacked sufficient contrast to allow the auto focus to work.
 
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Mike,

I think that, during focus shift shooting, the camera only auto focusses once at the beginning (or uses the manual override position). Subsequent steps are calculated based on the initial focus point and the aperture (and the focal length). If I am correct, then the same settings of aperture and initial focussing distance will always produce the same number of exposures.

DG
 
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Mike,

I think that, during focus shift shooting, the camera only auto focusses once at the beginning (or uses the manual override position). Subsequent steps are calculated based on the initial focus point and the aperture (and the focal length). If I am correct, then the same settings of aperture and initial focussing distance will always produce the same number of exposures.

DG

It would be interesting to conduct the test to determine if using the same initial focusing distance, aperture and step size always produces the same number of exposures when the total exposures is less than configured.

If the auto focus really takes place only in the first capture, I wonder why it's possible for an image to be completely out of focus when images captured before and after it are sharp in part of the scene.
 
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Mike,

I think that, during focus shift shooting, the camera only auto focusses once at the beginning (or uses the manual override position). Subsequent steps are calculated based on the initial focus point and the aperture (and the focal length). If I am correct, then the same settings of aperture and initial focussing distance will always produce the same number of exposures.

DG
This makes sense to me that it would be a mathematical formula that dictates the focus point shifts (based upon focal length, aperture, etc.). Using the image I posted as an example, I don't think the camera would necessarily know how to interpret the blue sky as a distant object--it probably just steps through the sequence by adjusting the focus point at determined intervals.

Glenn
 
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It would be interesting to conduct the test to determine if using the same initial focusing distance, aperture and step size always produces the same number of exposures when the total exposures is less than configured.

If the auto focus really takes place only in the first capture, I wonder why it's possible for an image to be completely out of focus when images captured before and after it are sharp in part of the scene.
Probably the easiest way with a fixed focal length lens would be to set minimum focus with manual override and choose aperture and step width. Those parameters are repeatable. There would be OOF images at the beginning and end of the sequence. I usually give Helicon all images including the OOF ones. It just ignores everything which is not in focus.

DG
 
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This makes sense to me that it would be a mathematical formula that dictates the focus point shifts (based upon focal length, aperture, etc.). Using the image I posted as an example, I don't think the camera would necessarily know how to interpret the blue sky as a distant object--it probably just steps through the sequence by adjusting the focus point at determined intervals.

Glenn
I agree with that. The focus differential will be narrow for the nearer steps and wider as you approach "infinity and beyond".

DG
 
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A couple of others from my gear testing session...(the second one is also focus stacked)

2021-04-22 orland-85.jpg
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In this frame is the Loebe Recreatioal Center (left), Village Hall (center, with clock tower) and the Civic Center (right)...
2021-04-22 orland-111.jpg
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I haven't done any extensive testing of these two lenses, but so far they appear tack sharp all the way through the corners. And, filters work with ease with the 14-24...I was able to attach a polarizing filter to this image in seconds. Finally, the camera and lenses are a bit smaller and lighter than my previous gear.

Glenn
 
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Relative to the last photo, which is very nice, do you have any images taken from a position to your right so the fountain and tower are an important pair of vertical elements in the scene?
Thanks Mike...I don't have any from that perspective from yesterday's visit, although I do have some vertical photographs featuring the clock tower from much further left. However, I'll be back!

Glenn
 
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