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Painterly? (added content in reply)

Discussion in 'Retouching and Post Processing' started by yamo, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Greetings... A couple tries at that painterly effect. What do you think? Critique appreciated...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 22, 2007
  2. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Second one is really nice
    What treatment did you use
     
  3. Yamo

    The water in the first one reminds me of modern art. It doesn't do much for me, but it may well be something special for someone else.

    The second one is more like the kind of images I try every now and then and has more possibilities for me. The water again; to me it doesn't look painted "enough" whereas the sailboat and background do. Is there a way to increase the painting effect on the water only?
     
  4. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Gale,

    Greetings. You write:
    Thanks... I follow a similar pattern for trying for these effects, but each image ends up on having a varied path if that makes sense. Post-processing starts with noise reduction, sharpening (sometimes over sharpening for effect), on a separate layer glowing edges inverted, adjust opacity (say 50%) and merge with appropriate blending option (depending on subject, often normal, but also soft, hard, vivid, pin light), then levels/curves/shadows&highlights/huesat to complete the global changes.

    Then a series of changes to specific areas by masking and painting with 0% hardness brushes. This brings in texture filters, often on a layer, adjust opacity and blending mode, correct saturation, etc. Cook until done.

    That said, probably more than you wanted to know, the second image:

    nr, glowing edges, invert, nr, 50% opacity, blend normal, levels, hue/sat, levels, blend I recall pin light, two filter passes with paint daubs and palette knife (opacity, blending, nr, hue/sat) I had to work the sky a lot.

    I try to use multiple stroke patterns to vary the appearance across the image and selectively keep or lose detail with the various stroke patterns.

    Thanks for the comment...

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
  5. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Dan,

    Greetings. You write:
    Yeah, most of that green swirly effect is in the original capture... its a reflection off of trees on the river bank. I guess over the top with the painterly, saturation boost.

    Again, yes, I'm not happy with the water, it needs work. Selective effects are part of the process for me so it can be worked on independently.

    Thanks much for the comments... (turnabout's fair play :wink:) 

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
  6. I like the second one best but have to agree about others' comments on the water. Gonna have to get with this technique at some point, looks like fun!
     
  7. I really like the water the duck is in. It does have echoes of E. Munch or Van Gogh for me. The duck looks incongruous and pasted in, which is a cool effect, but I wondered if I would like it even better if the duck were softened, blurred, swirled and muted a bit to fit more with the ambiance of the water. I think that would be very interesting to see. Might leave more of an impressionistic watercolor feel. Again, what you have is already quite remarkable.

    The second one is less interesting to me. low contrast, sky is a bit bland, but the real problem for me is the muddy, flat water. I might consider cropping about 1/2 of the water out and maybe a little sky to balance. It would make a more narrow, panorama-like view, but I think it would highlight the nice, subtle color shadings and other enhancements on the building, boat and trees.

    Very interesting techniques. I hope you'll share more.
     
  8. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Thomas,

    Greetings. Thanks for the comment...

    Keith,

    Greetings. Yeah, I liked the water in the duck picture, too. Interestingly, other that a bit of saturation and levels adjustment that is pretty much what the water looked like. I went back to the same location and took these shots of just water. The location is a river with flat slow moving water with a variety of plants along the riverbank with some areas of buildings, bridges and such. I posted a few more shots like these in the Miscellany section under the current Collective Shoot #44. These differ quite a bit from the duck picture owing to the wind (more) and my eye that day...

    [​IMG]
    Reflected trees on riverbank, one tree with purple leaves

    [​IMG]
    Reflected riverbank and sky, mixed trees, brush, dirt on riverbank.

    I'll probably shoot this location forever...

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
  9. yamo, i like the last set you posted. i'm not a fan of photoshop filters applied to nice photographs. my advice to you, buy some acrylics, a canvas and some brushes and paint one of your photos. you may be surprised!
     
  10. Yamo,

    I love that water. I can see why you'd shoot there often. I can visualize a small flotilla of toy sailboats bobbing in that water... That would be a fun pic.

    I've been thinking about Pushpin's point regarding highly pp'd images. I get this Google home page link showing sunset shots from Flickr. They all look soooo fake. Saturation beyond all belief, and a host of other enhancements. They are beautiful and striking, but are they photos? At what point does a photo stop being a photo? I know all photographic images are really all "post production" in that we couldn't see anything without considerable manipulation. There is no such thing as a "pure" photo.

    I think this creativity is art and worthwhile and fun. I just did my first "unnatural" photo, a quick homage to Magritte, trying out my new Sigma 10-20. I had a blast and it opens up such creative potential, yet creating a moment seems different than capturing one. Maybe we could have a forum for Photoshop Art?

    Anyway, I am getting way off-topic. Thanks for sharing and keep posting your pics, I want to see more.
     
  11. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Joe,

    Greetings. Thanks for the comment. You write:

    My skillset in digital media far exceeds those in more substantial inks and pigments, which allows me to focus more on the art rather than the craft (not to say that I don't still have much to learn in the craft of photography and digital processing).

    It strikes me that many explore the bounds of digital media inasmuch as it is new to them and as their skills develop so does the artistic eye (hopefully, at least) and the ability to apply those skills to the artistry.

    Filters, layers, manipulation? Gosh, that's how they become nice photographs to me :wink:

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
  12. yamo

    yamo

    Jun 28, 2007
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Keith,

    Greetings. Thanks for the kind words. Also you write:
    So, uh, like, you can take a "natural" photo with an ultrawide? My eyes certainly don't see the world like that without some sort of enhancement. I remember the first time I saw a movie of a full moon rising shot with a long telephoto. Wow, where can I go to see a moon that is that big? Is it a trick of the atmosphere? Er, ah, no, it's a trick of the lens.

    In my small philosophy, the perspective distortion of lenses wide and long are just as, if not more, "unnatural" to images as saturation boosting. And, of course, saturation boosting on a par with color conversion to B&W. A technological and historical accident that B&W film seems more "real" than grossly oversaturated digital images, I say. (They use chemicals on film, for heaven's sake :eek: )

    Of course, your mileage may vary.

    Cheers,

    -Yamo-
     
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