Pedals for Trek bike?

Joined
Dec 26, 2010
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Annapolis
Got my new Madone 4.5 today and was wondering which is the best pedals, cleats, and shoes to get? I know we have a lot of avid bikers here and want to get some advice of what you use. Likes and dislikes? Shimano and Look seem very popular.

Of course it had to be a rainy day when I bought it. I said the heck with it and took a nice 23 mile ride in the downpour anyway. I really think I'm going to like this bike!:smile:

Thanks.
 
Joined
May 2, 2006
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Vancouver, BC
Congrats on the new bike, I've never owned a Trek, but I was loaned one for a couple of weeks by my LBS while my Cervelo's frame was being replaced. It was a great ride, and even did a race on it. Performed very well.

I was partial to the classic Look pedals forever until I tried the new Time pedals... it's all personal preference, but it seemed to me the Time pedals were lighter.

Walking on Look and Time is pretty much the same, so not much difference there, and most shoes have the slots for both styles. Try them both, but having used both for years, I recommend the Time.
 
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
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Baton Rouge, La.
I have used the Look's since sometime in the late 80's and have never been let down. I don't ride as much these days, and don't know as much about what is out there, but my guess is that I would still go with a set of Looks.
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
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FL
I'm not that up to date on what is out there now but I have been using the Shimano pedals for a long time now and really like them. I actually have the Ultegra level pedals from probably 6 years ago and they have been perfect.

Lot's of quality stuff out there but that is what I like. I dont really think you can go wrong with any of the main players.
 
Joined
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Upstate SC
I'm a huge fan of Crank Bros. Granted, that's a mountain biker's perspective, but they have some roadie pedals now, too. I had Speedplays for a while. I wanted to like them, but falling over repeatedly for weeks because I couldn't disengage finally got to me :tongue: Again, that was their mtb pedals - their roadies may be different. Every bike I own from now on will get Crank Bros...
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2006
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Upstate New York
Great bike. Enjoy it!

Shoes and pedal systems are such a personal matter - it's a question of what you like best, not someone else. What have you been using? When I got a new Trek bike a couple of years ago (a lower level model than yours!) I simply got new shoes and a current version of the same pedal system I'd been using. And I got a current version of the same seat I'd been using. (I tried the one that came with the bike but my rear complained.)

One size/style does not suit all.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
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Greensboro, NC, USA
There isn't a best pedal or a best shoe. It's like saddles - it's what fits you and your riding style. Look is very popular because it provides the largest footbed, which absorbs more pressure from thousands of pedal strokes. SPD pedals, for instance, with their small metal cleat, will eventually feel like it's boring a hole right into the ball of your foot - very little contact area between foot & pedal. You want the most contact you can get. Then again, Look cleats are the biggest and most difficult to clomp around in when walking. Because I'm a girl, with smaller feet, I prefer Look KEO's because the cleat is small & thin and doesn't stick out from the edges of my shoes.

Speedplays give you lots of foodbed, but the cleat is so open it tends to gunk up with dirt when you walk around, so you're constantly cleaning out your cleats.

Time makes some good pedal-cleat systems, too.

For shoes, buy whatever fits you best. They'll wear out in 2-3 years anyway. SIDI's are pricey, and very narrow, and in my experience, fall apart just as fast as Pearl Izumis, Lakes, Nikes, Diadoras or any other brand.

Congrats on your new Trek. Now get out and ride at least 1 mile for every dollar you spent.
 
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With regards to Sidis, that's what I prefer, but shoes are shoes. They HAVE to work for you. In all fairness, though - I wear Dragons which are their top of the line mtb shoes and had better last! The cleats are user replaceable.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2007
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Fairfax, VA
Timely thread. :smile:

I was thinking about investing in road bike clips. I bought a Specialized CycloCross last year and put Shimano SPD (A530) dual-sided pedals. What was I thinking??? :confused: I've been riding almost exclusively on the road and probably benefit from road clips.
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2010
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Washington, DC metro
Echoing the other sentiments here, the best shoe is the one that fits you best. I'm a fan of the Specialized shoes, they're nice and wide for my EE width feet.

As far as pedals go, I'm a fan of both SPD's and Look Keo's. SPD's are nice in that the cleat is recessed into the shoe, you can walk normally. On long rides they will hotspot some though.

When I first went to dedicated road pedals I tried speedplays based on recommendations from a bunch of friends. I ended up not caring for how far you have to twist your ankle to release from the pedal. Fell a few times because of 'em too. So I went to Look Keo's. I haven't looked back at all. Works like a charm, super stable platform, and the pedal / cleat assembly is very short. So much so that I had to lower my seat, resulting in a slightly better fit on my bike.
 
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I bought a Specialized CycloCross last year and put Shimano SPD (A530) dual-sided pedals. What was I thinking??? :confused:

A pair of those is sitting right next to me, ready to go on the bike. It seemed like a good idea at the time.:smile: Got the shoes, but not yet the cleats. As this will be my first experiment with clipless, thinking about the SH-56 'multi-release' cleats, which are supposedly easier to unclip when you need to stop unexpectedly without toppling over..
 
Joined
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A pair of those is sitting right next to me, ready to go on the bike. It seemed like a good idea at the time.:smile: Got the shoes, but not yet the cleats. As this will be my first experiment with clipless, thinking about the SH-56 'multi-release' cleats, which are supposedly easier to unclip when you need to stop unexpectedly without toppling over..

This was my first time with cleats too. I had the bike shop adjust them loose and practiced with that. After a few weeks, I tighten them down myself more so I would not slip out on the up-stroke. Acclimating to them was pretty easy.
 
Joined
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Los Angeles, Ca.
Speedplay Zero's are my choice.

Fully adjustable float to save your knees and dual sided entry so you can just step down on the pedal and clip in..no need to look down and try and flip your pedal right-side up. Also worth mentioning, they give you a lot of cornering clearance which is nice when your pedaling through corners.

If you're new to clipless pedals you can also check out Speedplay Light Actions. The clip installed in the cleat makes clipping in-and-out super easy.
 
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I settled on the Shimano Ultegra PD-6700 pedals and Shimano shoes. I have to agree that selecting this stuff is a personal choice type of situation. I've been playing around with them to get the fit and feel of everything and I must say it is a smooth combo. Thanks to everyone.
 
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Fully adjustable float to save your knees and dual sided entry so you can just step down on the pedal and clip in..no need to look down and try and flip your pedal right-side up.

I did notice that I have to look down when using these. I guess I will get used to it and that should go away over time. Thanks.
 
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Dec 15, 2008
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I did notice that I have to look down when using these. I guess I will get used to it and that should go away over time. Thanks.



You do get used to it and wont have to look down more than any other system. I like that they have a big surface area and for as big as the cleats are, they are pretty easy to walk with. and not slippery.
 
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Houston, as little as possible.
Speedplays are hard to get used to. It took me ages. Crank brothers are OK, but the only ones I have ever used are drilled for mountain bike shoes. The newer Shimano road pedals are very good. They were designed to Lance Armstrong's preferences. You can always go with some hard rubber pedals and skip the fancy shoes :). It is very much a matter of personal preference. That is why high end road bike builds are priced without pedals.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2009
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783
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Hood River, Oregon
There are many choices on the market and it could years to find the perfect fit for yourself. I have friends that have tried three or four different peddles and are never happy. I was lucky and found something I liked from the beginning. Shimano 6700's http://www.coloradocyclist.com/product/item/SSFMBQ40 I find them easy to get into and I like the large surface area. I never have suffered from hot spots using these peddles and I have around 15,000 miles on the same set. I do replace the cleats about once a year as they are plastic and wear down from walking around.

Good luck.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2006
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546
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northern NJ
As a long time roadie/racer, I've switched to mtb shoes and Shimano SPD mtb/touring pedals (A520). I'm not racing anymore and riding for fun/fitness, so being able to walk around is more convenient. With road pedals/cleats, you walk like a duck on the cleats.

All the systems work well. I've used Looks and Speedplays for years prior. Speedplays have a lot of float, which is good if your knees are bothersome.

Shoes can be an issue if you have wide feet. Many of the European shoes (Sidi for example) are more narrow than typical US shoes, although Sidi has a "Mega" model on their top shoes. Sidi are expensive but last for years and years. For a long while, Sidi and Carnac were the only high quality cycling shoes. But now there are more - Northwave, Lake as well as Shimano, Trek/Bontrager and Specialized. You need to try them on with the socks that you will wear, as most of the sizing is European as well.

If you're not racing, I really don't see the need for a road shoe and cleat. The mtb shoe will be slightly heavier but it's pretty nominal.

Also, after you ride in the rain, relube your chain and pull out the seatpost to dry and relube. Water from rear wheel goes right down the seat tube and will eventually freeze/bond the seatpost to the seat tube. When that happens, some times the only way to remove it is to heat the seat tube with a torch, which ruins the paint.
 

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