Please help me heat and cool my upgraded makeshift studio -- PROJECT CANCELLED

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I'm going to create a temporary room in my carport for use as a larger makeshift studio than my current, ridiculously small makeshift studio. I need to heat and cool it but only when I'm using the space. I know nothing about cooling and heating stuff and after doing considerable reading, I still understand very little. I'm sure the folks here can at least get me pointed in the right direction if not recommend the ideal cooling and heating products to consider.

Room Size & Insulation
10' x 12' floor with 8' ceiling

One of the long walls will be a retractable, floor-to-ceiling curtain with R10 insulation. None of the other walls have insulation and the ceiling has no insulation. The floor is a concrete pad.

Cooling & Heating Capabilities
I'll want to heat the room to 60 degrees Fahrenheit when the starting temperature is 30 degrees. I'll want to cool the room to 80 degrees when the starting temperature is 100 degrees.

Other Practicalities
I typically use the makeshift studio no more than three or four days of the week and less than 4 hours at a time. When I'm done with a photo session, I'll turn off the heating and cooling, pull back the retractable curtain and return the car to the carport.

The most practical solution insofar as using the makeshift studio is concerned would be a wall-mounted unit. It would be even better if it doesn't have to be connected to an outside device. (A portable device that sits on the floor would be less desirable because I could accidentally knock it over and because it would take up floor space, which is at a premium.)

I don't have a need for a particularly quiet device.

If I have to add an electrical hookup to my fuse box, I can make that happen. If that's not necessary, better yet.

Current Questions
What BTU rating would be best? (One online calculator indicated that about 5000 BTU would be fine. Another one indicated that I need to get at least 12,000 BTU.)

What are the questions that should be asked that I don't know enough to ask?
 
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Since this involves electricity one way or another, would you need to check with the county for any sort of permits to make modifications to your carport?
Not that I know of. I'll have a certified technician install any unit that requires an outdoor condenser. He'll let me know if a permit needs to be pulled.
 
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I would go with a radiant quartz heater, or similar. I've used a quartz heater in my garage and crawl space work area.
The other heaters that I have, take time to heat the air, before you get heated. So I have to turn it on a couple hours earlier. And without insulation, heated air will lose a lot of heat. Also that COLD concrete floor will act like a heat sink, unless you can roll a rug over it during your shoots.

I would look into insulating the studio area, as best as can be done.
Otherwise you will loose a lot of the heat and cooling, and will need a lot more heating/cooling capacity, to compensate for that loss.
 
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I would go with a radiant quartz heater, or similar.
Thanks for the recommendation!

I've never heard of that product category so I looked up some models. All of them seem to be portable units. I'm surprised (because I'm completely ignorant about this stuff) such small units would heat a room such as your garage or crawl space. Definitely well worth considering, though it doesn't attend to my need for air conditioning.
 
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Trying to picture your space. Carports are usually unfinished and open.
So this is open with 3 concrete walls without insulation, and a lightly insulated curtain for a 4th wall?
Without insulation, this space is going to be very difficult to make comfortable. The concrete walls/floor are going to start off at 30degrees, it will take a lot of thermal energy to heat it up.
If there is any breeze involved, this will become nearly impossible. It would be a nice place to photograph ice and snowflakes.
Also remember any heater or AC will cause air currents, which I have had wreck some of my macro images, especially flower stacks where any airflow moves everything.
Post a picture, will give us a better picture of what you are putting together.
Personally my work got better and more convenient when I had a permanent space where I could leave stuff setup.
Hope you can figure it out.

Gary
 
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Thanks for the recommendation!

I've never heard of that product category so I looked up some models. All of them seem to be portable units. I'm surprised (because I'm completely ignorant about this stuff) such small units would heat a room such as your garage or crawl space. Definitely well worth considering, though it doesn't attend to my need for air conditioning.
It does not heat the garage, but like a fireplace or camp fire, the radient heat heats what it hits, not the air. So with it directed at me, it heats me. That way I don't have to heat the entire garage.
 
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Mike, I don't think this is going to work, especially in the summer if you want to cool it. But please give us some more information. You've described one wall, but what will the other three be? I'm having trouble picturing this. And this is a photography forum!
 
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I don't think this is going to work
I'm confident it will work for two reasons:
  • My expectations are only that the temperature in the room will rise to 60 degrees when the temperatures are coldest outside and will lower to only 80 degrees when the temperatures are hottest outside.
  • My current makeshift studio is in a room the same size with absolutely no insulation. It is heated by an electric baseboard heater that is only 27" long. It is cooled by a central air conditioning duct that is farther from the air conditioner than any point in the house, so much so that it is cooled far less than any other room. Yet the temperatures in that room almost meet the standards I hope to achieve in my upcoming temporary room.
You've described one wall, but what will the other three be?
The one wall I've already described is one of the long walls, which will have the retracting, floor-to-ceiling partition that has R10 insulation. The other long wall is a brick wall with no insulation and a door into my current makeshift studio. One of the short walls is a brick wall with no insulation that is an exterior wall of the main house. The other short wall, which is 8' tall by 10' wide, is a brick wall with no insulation. It has a 5' high x 10' wide area with jalousie windows. To eliminate confusion, I didn't mention that I might (or might not) fill that area with insulation. If it would be helpful for me to make a drawing, please don't hesitate to let me know.
 
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How about a mini-split heat pump? The only negative for you is that there is a small condenser unit that goes outside.
Based on my limited understanding of the research I've done so far, that product category seems the most promising.

My wife has seen wall-mounted heating-cooling units in buildings that she doesn't think were connected to any outside device but I've not found anything like that. Please confirm that the mini-split heating-air conditioning units require being connected to an external condenser.
 
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So this is open with 3 concrete walls without insulation, and a lightly insulated curtain for a 4th wall?
The situation is very close to what you described. I didn't see your post until after I provided information in post #12. Please refer to that post and provide any follow-up that will be helpful.
 
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Without insulation, this space is going to be very difficult to make comfortable.
I'm not looking for comfort; I'm looking for no higher than 60 degrees in the winter and no cooler than 80 degrees in the summer. I don't consider that comfortable; I consider it doable.

Personally my work got better and more convenient when I had a permanent space where I could leave stuff setup.
I have a permanent space now. The problem is that after using it for nearly 13 years, I'm getting tired of it being so ridiculously small. My working area is about 6' x 9' and that includes the area where all of the light stands, electric cords and other devices needed as part of the setup are located around the tabletop. I rarely leave anything setup overnight, so I'm not concerned about having to tear the setup down after each session.

Also remember any heater or AC will cause air currents, which I have had wreck some of my macro images, especially flower stacks where any airflow moves everything.
I rarely get into that kind of photography. Even so, the few times I have done so, I haven't had that experience in my current makeshift studio, not that it wouldn't happen in the new one.
 
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Based on my limited understanding of the research I've done so far, that product category seems the most promising.

My wife has seen wall-mounted heating-cooling units in buildings that she doesn't think were connected to any outside device but I've not found anything like that. Please confirm that the mini-split heating-air conditioning units require being connected to an external condenser.
This may have been what she has seen.
I have heard of individuals using these for those hard to heat and cool areas of the house.

https://www.mitsubishicomfort.com/products/indoor-units/wall-mounted-heating-and-cooling/compare

These are also an option.
Basic old school thru the wall A/C but these have heat as well.

https://www.homedepot.com/b/Heating...h-Heater/N-5yc1vZc4mdZ1z182zp?storeSelection=
 
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The first two that I checked require an outside condenser. There are lots of systems like that, so I think my wife saw that kind of system and didn't realize it was connected to an outside condenser.

I had never heard of those. I might have seen them but wrongly thought they only provided cooling.
 
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I had never heard of those. I might have seen them but wrongly thought they only provided cooling.
[/QUOTE]

This type used to be cooling only.
The addition of heating capability as well is something new.
This might be the easiest way to go if you can determine how many BTU's you need and the max voltage that you have in the carport. Cut a hole in the wall and plug it in.
I installed a couple of these for relatives years ago.
Not that difficult at all.
 
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