Question about using old lenses with a D850

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I anticipate changing to a new camera model in the next two years, which will be a big deal for me considering that my current camera, a D7000, is already ten years old with 80,000 clicks. I initially imagined three important criteria for my next camera: mirrorless, a vertical grip with buttons that control the camera, and focus shifting. However, regardless of which manufacturer I go with, switching to mirrorless will require buying new lenses to retain auto focusing (my current lenses are listed below).

So, I am now imagining buying a D850, as it is missing only the least important criterion -- mirrorless -- and would allow me to use all of my current lenses as I use them now including auto focusing. I wonder though if the resolving capability of my lenses, which are relatively old models, will be a significant mismatch with the resolving capability of the D850's sensor. That gets to my question that I know the gear-head gurus hanging out here will be able to answer:

Taking into account that I'm not a pixel peeper, which of my current lenses shown below when mounted on a D850 will produce image quality that is at least as good as when they are mounted on my D7000?

Tokina 12-24mm f/4 AT-X Pro SD (IF) DX
Nikon 35mm f/2 AF-D
Nikon 85mm f/1.8 AF-D
Tamron 90mm f/2.8 macro SP AF Di
Nikon 180mm f/2.8 AF-ED (IF) -- smooth plastic barrel and retractable metal hood but with no switch or push-pull ring for manual focus manufactured only from 1986-1987
Nikon 300mm f/4 AF-ED -- crinkly metal manufactured only from 1977-1979

Thanks for your help and advice (except please don't tell me that the vertical grip shouldn't be an important criterion for me ). :)
 
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That issue with resolving power was one that I took into consideration when contemplating making my change, as many of my lenses were older ones, too, and any new camera was going to have significantly greater resolution than was around at the time those lenses were new. I was concerned that a camera with say 40 or 60 MP would all-too-accurately point up any flaws in both my shooting technique and the lenses. My decision was to go all-new.....and yes, I still miss some of my other lenses!

Would an "L bracket" work for you instead of a vertical grip or in conjunction with one? A fully-equipped vertical grip does come in handy when out in the field and shooting hand-held....

Have a question: I keep seeing the terms "focus stacking" and "focus shifting." My new camera has something called "pixel shifting." I know "focus stacking" is a technique used in macro photography but I am not too sure about the other terms and whether they are the same as each other or each means something different and how much relationship they have to the technique of "focus stacking." ???
 
Thanks, Mike! I've been meaning to look up information about pixel shifting -- obviously it is not a feature which I've found a compelling need to use yet, LOL!! Ah, OK, so Nikon uses "focus shifting" rather than "focus stacking." Got it! That is a technique I have not yet attempted, primarily because I don't have the relevant hardware (macro rail) or software to complete the process.
 
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Ah, OK, so Nikon uses "focus shifting" rather than "focus stacking." Got it! That is a technique I have not yet attempted, primarily because I don't have the relevant software to complete the process.
I've not been able to find anything confirming that any Sony mirrorless camera has focus stacking, including yours. So, to use focus stacking, you would need both the external hardware and software to make that happen.
 
I've not been able to find anything confirming that any Sony mirrorless camera has focus stacking, including yours. So, to use focus stacking, you would need both the external hardware and software to make that happen.
Right, I edited my post to add "hardware," intending to mention both the camera body and the macro rail, got hung up on thinking about the macro rail and forgot to include the camera body. (Need another cup of coffee, I guess!) Yes, as far as I know, none of the Sony cameras has focus stacking, which is rather interesting and odd, considering that it is not all that new a technology and just about every other manufacturer includes it now. It's not something I have an urgent desire or craving for, but it would be nice. I think Sony was more interested in improving their eye-focus technology for people and animals.....
 
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I have a large collection of older screw type lenses and have yet to realize any issues with my D850. It's a beautiful camera Mike. You'll be a happy camper. When you're ready for the vertical grip I chose the Velo with Wasabi batteries and the Wasabi charger. Have had zero issues with this setup and saved several hundred dollars verses OEM.
 
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Thanks, guys! This is very helpful information. I'll now take the time to review other details of the D850.

When you're ready for the vertical grip I chose the Velo with Wasabi batteries and the Wasabi charger. Have had zero issues with this setup and saved several hundred dollars verses OEM.
I always used to use non-Nikon grips until one damaged my camera. I'm confident the statistical chance of it happening to me a second time is even lower than it happening the first time. Even so, once that damage was caused, I've never used a non-Nikon grip and won't. There's no reason to think my next camera won't be good for me for another ten years, and when spending an extra $400 or so, the amortization over that period of time renders the extra cost of a Nikon grip meaningless.
 
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Butlerkid

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The focus shifting on the D850 is excellent and easy to use. P)erfect for macros, etc. Likewise the LV is great and focus peaking feature is FANTASTIC! Glenn showed me how he used focus peaking in architecture shots and that's the only way I shoot architecture now. LOL!
 
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Taking into account that I'm not a pixel peeper, which of my current lenses shown below when mounted on a D850 will produce image quality that is at least as good as when they are mounted on my D7000?
I agree with other responders that all of your lenses, when mounted on a D850, will produce images at least as good as those you get from your D7000. However, I don't think any of them will give you images that are as good as the D850 is capable of.

Thom Hogan addresses this issue in his list of recommended lenses for Nikon FX sensors.
 

Butlerkid

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I assumed that. I do wonder, though, if I would be able to detect any increased capability when viewing a 16" x 24" print or an image on a 1920 x 1080 television or computer monitor when using a normal, reasonable viewing distance.
I seriously doubt it....... Instead of being concerned about choosing the D850.....you could use the lenses you have while watching for great prices on used lenses that will actually improve the quality your currently get and take advantage of the advances the D850 offers.
 
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Thom Hogan addresses this issue in his list of recommended lenses for Nikon FX sensors.
Hogan says in that article that "you buy a high resolution body to get exceptional pixel level performance." Actually, that's NOT the reason I'm seriously considering the D850. Indeed, if I could get the vertical grip and focus shifting in a DX camera, I would prefer that over the D850, especially if it was mirrorless. Unfortunately, a camera with a vertical grip and focus shifting doesn't seem to be in Nikon's plan unless it's a full frame DSLR.

Hogan also says the "short working distances [of the 60mm and 105mm Micro-Nikkors] make them less usable than what I (or you should) really want." Nice of him to tell me what I should want. Actually, the short working distance is ideal in my makeshift studio, but I'm not surprised that he apparently assumes everyone uses a macro lens to photograph live animals.
 
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Mike,

Can you confirm that your research shows that the D850 will focus stack with older "screw" drive lenses?

One of the "features" of the Z cameras is that auto-focus and therefore focus stacking will only work with "G" lenses, or at least lenses with built-in motors and therefore only electronic connection between lens and camera.

I am not saying that they will not work, just that I do not know and would like to know.

DG.
 
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you could use the lenses you have while watching for great prices on used lenses that will actually improve the quality your currently get and take advantage of the advances the D850 offers.
Exactly my thinking. Thanks for confirming it without me first mentioning it. Even so, so long as I'm happy with the results, I'm rarely inclined to spend time evaluating gear and money buying it simply to achieve relatively small measures of improvement. That's especially true if I can't perceive the improvement when viewing photos as I view them 99% of the time.
 
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Can you confirm that your research shows that the D850 will focus stack with older "screw" drive lenses?
Thanks for bringing that to my attention, Dave. I'll look carefully into that and get back to the thread.

I always assumed that focus stacking required only auto focus lenses, not lenses with a focusing motor. That's because I don't remember anyone mentioning the need for the motor.
 
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The D850 manual explains on page 212 that an AF-S or AF-P lens must be used to do focus shifting. That means I would also need to replace my macro lens and my 35mm lens, as those are the two lenses I would almost always use with focus shifting.

This revelation, thanks to Dave, makes the move to a D850 more questionable.
 

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