Question about young people and cursive writing

Growltiger

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One thing I've noticed, too, that they don't seem to be teaching children how to hold a pencil, either -- I have seen photos or kids in person with the pencil or pen positioned so awkwardly it's a wonder they can get anything down on paper. They sure as heck wouldn't be able to write cursively that way!

Handwriting clue: Thomas Jefferson??
 
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A couple weeks ago I saw a spray painted tag done in cursive on a brick wall. It actually looked nice and I probably wouldn't mind spray paint vandalism as much if people used better spraymanship! :D
 
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You don't have to be a physician to have bad handwriting, believe me. I am a retired Clinical Microbiologist and going through a major (and MS program) like that you really do not take notes, you have to take dictation. Not that most students nowadays take notes, all of their lectures are in PowerPoint and they can just download them. Pretty lame if you ask me. The three legs of the learning triangle are hear it, see it, write it. Cursive does allow you to write a lot quicker than printing for most people, though admittedly I can print pretty quickly and my printing is pretty bad too. When I was going through school people used to occasionally ask me if they could borrow my notes because they missed a lecture. They would tell me "I can't read this!" to which I usually replied "I didn't take them for you. Maybe if you showed up for class more often you would not have to keep borrowing other people's notes!"

My college note taking handwriting was sooooo bad, that I had to rewrite my notes at the end of the day, while I could still remember the lecture, so that I could read them. I once looked at my old class notes, and could not read them.
Having to rewrite my notes helped my learning process.
 

Growltiger

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Handwriting clue: Thomas Jefferson??

Good try, but it's not him, it is Albert Einstein...

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The teaching profession took entirely the wrong approach!

Handwriting is an Art and it should be taught as "ART"!

Try this: Provide a stack of white paper; a bottle of real black ink and broad-nibbed dip-pens (or even cut some feathers into Quills!). Then see just how much fun a bunch of children can have making large letter-forms in classic Italic.

I have done exactly that but I don't know how popular I was with their parents when they wanted to splosh-around with real, and very black, ink when they went home.

Once someone learns how to shape a letter correctly so that it looks beautiful when drawn at a large size, their everyday handwriting will change over-night — especially if you can persuade them to throw away those horrible ball-pointed pens.
 
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Interesting idea of teaching handwriting as an art.

The problem in many places is the cheap paper, it will make a fountain pen BLOT.
Gel pens is a compromise. Smooth like a fountain pen, and won't blot.
 
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Handwriting can be in different styles. One of them is the Cursive (with looped ascenders and descenders) which was widely taught in American schools.

Another is based on the much more elegant Italic style.

Some may call Italic "calligraphic" but those of us who went to schools (not in America!) where Italic was taught as standard "hand-writing" use Italic, and the way that it has evolved for us individually over the years, as our normal everyday handwriting.

Italic uses joined-up characters but it eschews those ugly Loops
The people who taught Italic considered Looped Cursive to be rather old fashioned and Victorian!

Incidentally, I still prefer to use a real fountain pen filled with black ink too!
 
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Incidentally, I still prefer to use a real fountain pen filled with black ink too!

I've had toooo many years of using nothing but black ink.
So, I switched to dark green as my work ink and bright green for casual writing.
But have a few other pens in other colors, so I don't get bored. :D

I had a high school and college classmate, who could print as fast as I could write in cursive.
And you could READ her writing, which you could not with mine.
 

Growltiger

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I've had toooo many years of using nothing but black ink.
So, I switched to dark green as my work ink and bright green for casual writing.
But have a few other pens in other colors, so I don't get bored. :D

I had a high school and college classmate, who could print as fast as I could write in cursive.
And you could READ her writing, which you could not with mine.
It is best not to let people know you use green ink.
To find out why google "green ink brigade" and read some of the results.
 
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I've had toooo many years of using nothing but black ink.
So, I switched to dark green as my work ink and bright green for casual writing.
But have a few other pens in other colors, so I don't get bored. :D

I had a high school and college classmate, who could print as fast as I could write in cursive.
And you could READ her writing, which you could not with mine.
Green ink absolutely banned in my world.
Never ever.
 
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I still have a note my parents saved from my 4th grade teacher- from about 1962. I was 9.
The teacher wrote to my parents that she thought I would grow up to be a physician, as I had the worst handwriting she had ever seen.
Roughly 20years later when I graduated with my MD we did try to find her- but she had passed away.
Great memories
gary
 
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I learned cursive in school and can write my name in cursive. My signature is cursive-ish but realistically is the number 82 the way I sign my name. I can very easily write my name on a document in cursive but if I had to go to court and was asked if it was MY signature... nope, sorry... not my signature.
 
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I learned cursive in school and can write my name in cursive. My signature is cursive-ish but realistically is the number 82 the way I sign my name. I can very easily write my name on a document in cursive but if I had to go to court and was asked if it was MY signature... nope, sorry... not my signature.
I would agree that there is often a difference between cursive and a signature. And my signature sometimes has hints of cursive and at other times is just my signature, readable or otherwise.

--Ken
 

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