QuickGamma

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Has anyone on the forum used QuickGamma to calibrate their monitor? http://www.phototopics.net/pt_gamma/ I've been having trouble with my monitor and prints not looking the same. I have no calibration equipment.............but I have used the calibration on my Windows program, but it still isn't quite right. I can't afford a fancy color calibrator, so that's not even a consideration. I'm wondering if my HP PhotoSmart 6280 All-in-One printer is the culprit. If you've used the QuickGamma to calibrate your monitor, I'd appreciate a review.
 
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(Mike) Michael Skerritt.
I have Hp's older model. The C-5280 AIO that I use for CD printing and letters etc. It works fine but I hint use it for my photo printing. I use an A3 Epson R-2400. I have it a long time now and it is works flawlessly. I use a continuous ink system on it. What cartridges are you using. Are the OEM or an aftermarket cope? I wouldn't trust the Windows program and if I hadn't got my Spider pro I would just use the printers own settings. Reset your monitor to its factory settings first. Print a test page.
Hope this helps.
Mike
 
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I just can't afford a dedicated printer............any more than I can afford a commercial color calibration system.

I use OEM cartridges in my printer. I've tried both methods: PhotoShop controls the printing colors and have
 
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Oops.............didn't finish.

I was saying I've let both PhotoShop and the Printer be responsible for the print.............but my prints remain the same.....slightly too dark. I've set my monitor to default and that didn't change it.
 

Growltiger

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You must not let both Photoshop and the printer control the colours. Choose one or the other. To keep it simple with your setup let the printer control the colours.

That program can have a go at adjusting the gamma but cannot help you much with the brightness which is your problem.

If the prints are too dark that usually means the monitor is far too bright. The default settings for almost all monitors are too bright. You need to make it much darker. Then when you edit the photos you will automatically make them lighter. So then they will print lighter. Try this at different brightness settings on the monitor, until the print comes out as you want it. Then remember that setting.

(Because you can't calibrate your monitor, all your work is currently being edited to be too dark and will also display too dark on other people's calibrated monitors. FYI a ColorMunki Smile is $75.)
 
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......I use OEM cartridges in my printer.....
This can be a big problem due to the inks not exactly matching the originals and when combined with the wrong paper ICC profile choice.

Also when you calibrate and profile a monitor with a calibrator you are performing two actions, a. Setting the monitor to as near as possible a defined standard e.g. D65, Gamma 2.2, 110 cd/m2 (as a specific example) etc. and b. After taking account of the difference between your defined standards and what the monitor can actually display a profile is built describing the monitor condition thereby enabling any colour savvy application to display your image data correctly

This profile is used by your OS and importantly by any colour managed application.

Obviously you cannot build a profile without the equipment and application for the job but with a little time and experimentation you should be able to achieve pleasing results similar to what you see on screen.

You should take this one step at a time and there is likely initially to be some cost both in time and the financial one, ink and paper.

I would suggest starting at the beginning as follows:
1. Get some original manufacturers ink
2. Get some manufacturers paper - suggest glossy or semi gloss to start
3. Use the calibration program to manually set your monitor as close as possible.
4. Initially use a test image rather than your own to look at screen to print match. This is a good one http://www.pixl.dk/download/
5. Use PS soft proofing and check that you are viewing with the correct ICC paper profile - nothing else will do !
6. Print with PS manages colours and very important first turn off colour management in your printer driver.
7. If all has gone well you should have a good match print to screen. Provided that you have also illuminated the print correctly (a major omission for many that leads to tears)

You may find your prints either too light or too dark when compared to screen. In this case it is likely to be one of two causes, provided all other criteria met. First monitor luminosity set too high (prints appear too dark) or monitor luminosity set too low (prints too dark). Alternatively print illumination is not matching screen for white balance or luminosity
 
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I've repeatedly set my brightness by various "charts" made available on-line. Presently it's set to the average of 4 of them, I believe.
You cannot really set your brightness to any value without using an instrument to measure it. Brightness settings of 50, 30, 80% or other are meaningless and not necessarily the same actual level between monitors. So you need to take a different approach

Go through the test pages at the Lagom site taking note of how your monitor appears vs their suggestions
http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/?
Then use the Pixl test linked above and read the notes of how the image should appear on your monitor
 
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I'm confused, I thought Chris said he was using OEM ink.
No you are not the confused I AM :oops:. In front of my very eyes and I even quoted him. Sorry about that I am now taking my old bones to bed :sleep:
 

Growltiger

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When TonyW wrote this:
First monitor luminosity set too high (prints appear too dark) or monitor luminosity set too low (prints too dark).
I'm sure he meant:
First monitor luminosity set too high (prints appear too dark) or monitor luminosity set too low (prints too light).
 

Growltiger

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Charts etc won't get you anywhere on luminosity. Simply experiment yourself.
Make the monitor far darker than now. Write down the setting. Edit the photo that printed too dark. Then print it again. After a few experiments you will find the brightness that works for you and makes prints that look correct.
 
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Had to giggle, Tony. Yup, OEM= Originial Equipment Manufacturer...........or in this case, Hewlet Packard Ink cartridges. But thanks for links and comments. Very helpful.

Guess Growltiger is right..........I'd better start experimenting.
 
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TonyW, I'm embarrassed to admit, I've been using digital photography for 14 years now and your post was the first time I've ever heard the term "soft proof". Sent me scurrying to go through several books to find it. Wow.....................talk about feeling like a dummy! Oh well, if I don't learn something new every day, I'm wasting time living.

I have a question about that test image. I downloaded it. Do I just print it without doing anything to it and then compare it with what I'm observing on the monitor?
 
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Hi Chris,
Let's Hope I have recovered sufficiently from my brain farts of yesterday :D

The Pixl test image can give you a lot of information and indicate potential monitor issues re brightness and contrast as well as colour. You need to switch on info or notes if I remember correctly in PS. You will then get a series of info post it's describing how certain areas of the image should appear. If there are gross differences between this and the Lagom suggestions for monitor then you should investigate further to get closer screen match

To answer your question yes just print it without adjustment. But first you must select soft proof and select the paper profile otherwise you will not be seeing what the printer will be printing. The paper profile adjust the display to approximate how your print will look. The accuracy of which dependent on several factors not least of which is accurate monitor set up
 
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I've been reading and messing around with all of this stuff and all it's gotten me is messed up! When I open PhotoShop, it's green instead of gray........same with Bridge. The colors on my desktop are now all screwed up..........can't get the contrast or brightness back to looking normal. Any thoughts as to what I might have messed up? (besides everything?)
 
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Ohh dear! Without witnessing the sequence of events and knowing your equipment setup it is difficult to tell. Can you trace any of the steps you took to arrive at this state?

In the meantime - assuming Windows PC and that you have rebooted system and still have issues

  • Check in Color Management you have not tried to apply a strange icc profile to Windows
  • You may have made adjustment to your graphic card via the driver or played with the individual physical controls on the monitor
    • Check your Graphics Card settings via the driver and look for a Reset button
    • Check your monitor instructions and see if there are any reset to defaults and also what 'normal/default' settings are in your current monitor state.
Cannot think of anything else at the moment. If problem persists can you describe in detail your system including OS version, Graphics card, Monitor name and model and anything else you may feel relevant
 

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