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Random Dragons & Damsel

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by j.ankanpaa, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. Hello!

    Some random shots taken this summer...

    It was really a pleasant surpize to find this female Lestes dryas, Large Fairy-Damsel as we call them. I was at the O. cecilia place which is not typical for Lestes species and I have never seen them there before. I saw this and immediately noticed how robust it is and realized it´s a L. dryas not L. sponsa which is very very common here.
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    L. dryas is not exactly that rare but very localized.
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    This is a female Lestes sponsa, quite a bit slimmer than its cousin (note the tiny spider lurking above its head)
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    And a male Lestes sponsa
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    While shooting O.cecilias this male Sympetrum flaveolum posed nicely and I couldn´t refuse
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    Calopteryx species are always so nice to watch. This is a male C. splendens
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    Female C. splendens
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    I have watched some Cordulegaster boltoniis and their culinarist habits and they seem to be specialized to bees and wasps. This male C. boltonii is a real old war horse. Its upper left wing was totally cut and there was only about 3mm left of it. But still hunting without probs, a real fighter
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    Then some DIF shots.

    Two shots of the same male Aeshna juncea
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    And finally a finnish speciality, one of the couple species which foreign Odonata enthusiasts come to see here, A male Aeshna crenata. Very large Dragon, very aggressive towards the others and really controlling the air. Note very vibrant blue color compared to A. juncea.
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    There were several female A. crenatas laying eggs. This one took a rest between the task and let me took some shots. Female crenata is very easy to ID even in-flight because of the brown areas on its wings
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    Oh, forgot! Not the best pic I have got but this was my photographed species #50, a male Aeshna caerulea
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    Thanks for looking! :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2009
  2. Beautiful collection, Jukka.

    We also have Lestes Dryas and Aeschna juncea, though I have yet to find the latter species.

    How many flight shots did you take to get these two? Do you use any special techniques for shooting flying dragons?

    Cheers,

    Larry
     
  3. Excellent Jukka!

    I'm always amazed you can get them flying with such IQ.
     
  4. aspiringphotos

    aspiringphotos

    Sep 26, 2008
    Kansas
    Excellent series!
     
  5. fantastic as always. The in flight shots are really well done.
     
  6. Zee71

    Zee71

    Apr 1, 2007
    Queens, NY
    I am floored.............these are fantastic!!!!
     
  7. always love jewelwings and your DIF's amaze. Are these manual focus dif's? The reason I ask is that I have yet to be able to have auto lock in no matter what mode I try.
     
  8. Thanks, guys!

    About the DIFs: I use half MF, half AF. Meaning I try to get the Dragon somewhat clear in VF by MFing and then hit the shutter button all the way down (AF) and when the cam achieves the focus lock it will fire right away. Sometimes it work, sometimes it won´t... Using only the center focus point...

    I guess I need to take something like 20 shots to get couple of decent ones...
     
  9. I'll have to try that again. Unless I am doing something wrong when I have tried to get close on MF first the lens would just hunt all over on AF as if I was not even close. I was always under the impression that the lens would only have to decide on a range of a few feet if you were close rather than 6 ft to infinity. hmmmmm
     
  10. Hagen

    Hagen

    140
    Dec 18, 2008
    San Diego
    gahh that makes me squirm to see them up close like that. I can only look at the photo for like a second then I scroll away. any closer and I would need to get my fly swatter to bat my monitor.
    back on topic Nice shots crisp and sharp.
     
  11. Beautiful collection Jukka - I love the DIF's :) 
     
  12. Forgot to mention I use a tripod when shooting DIFs. The head is quite loose but offers still enough support...
     
  13. 3whiteroses

    3whiteroses

    664
    May 23, 2008
    Maryland
    Fantastic Images!
     
  14. lol DIF on tripod? Now you are really rubbing it in Jukka!! Love it and love the shots
     
  15. Wow, Very nice detail.
     
  16. Yep, DIFs on tripod! It´s not as crazy as it may sound :smile: ...ofcourse Dragons need to be those "hovering still" -types... actually I have never even tried those other types...
     
  17. captaincarl777

    captaincarl777

    370
    Jan 19, 2009
    NJ
    Really an amazing series! What were you shooting with?
     
  18. Hi Carl!

    #1-4 were shot with a 300mm AF-S F4 + a Nikon PN-11 tube, rest just bare 300mm. I used tripod + wired shutter too...
     
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