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recalibration test

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by barry lloyd, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    hI1aLRN.jpg
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    Having not been too happy with the previous recalibration I had another go using the Nikon D810 and a Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f2.8 G ED non VR lens. hand held. the wind didn't help that much either. Used a SpyderlensCal

    Think this is now ok, Comments please?
     
  2. Not sure what your expectations were but checking a calibration with a hand held camera in the wind would not be the way to do it IMHO. Looking at a full image of the flower you have a definite ghost image which would indicate either camera shake or wind movement of the flower. You did not indicate what shutter speed you were using but it would seem that a faster speed would serve you better.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Looks oof to me.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. There's evidence of subject and/or camera movement seeing that there's nothing sharp in the image. As Gordon pointed out you didn't state your shutter speed. Knowing that and aperture would help people comment.

    Larry
     
  5. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    Thanks you for your replies first of all,and comments noted

    The calibration initially was done with both camera and target on tripods and using a remote shutter release. Having set that up as best i could the next thing was to try out in "working" conditions, ie hand held for this shot. Aperture was f8.0 exposure time 1/10" and ISO @400. Lens @70mm at about 4/5 ft away (estimated) or there abouts. data according to exif file. That is the best info I can give now. The lens doesn't have image stablisation as that version came out long after i purchased this one. Oh it was too cold to keep trying different shutter speeds etc so done in a bit of a rush ,but still no excuse really

    If i had set this up on a tripod with no wind and remote shutter release then yes the shot may well have been better, agreed.

    There is a reason for hand held as shortly my wife and I are going to the Norwegian Fjords A lot or all photos will be hand held due to time allocation for each day out trip on a cruise.

    So getting it as best i can now hopefully will reflect in the photos on the holiday
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  6. I think the 1/10 sec shutter speed is all the explanation needed for the fuzzy picture.

    Larry
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  7. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    You are absolutely right Larry, one of my biggest faults is not checking camera settings first. have to own up a bit , I had just had a telephone call from a friend saying her husband had passed away last night. My wife and i have known them for over 40 years and very close friends. Most of today my mind has been thinking about him, my best pal, and calibrating and taking the photo was a way of taking my mind off things
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  8. Barry - Gordon is right; you definitely have movement in your image which would blur the detail. I shoot flowers with a D810 and a 105 macro VR instead of my 24-70 non-VR lens. I went back and looked at some flowers that are acceptably sharp and my shutter speed is at 1/200 or faster. I'd recommend that you crank up your shutter speed above 1/80 and try your rig out on a stationary subject. That should give you a better feel on how the auto-focus is doing. Also, you might start with your AF set on AF-C using the center single focus point and go from there to test your combo out. I hope these suggestions are helpful.
     
  9. I'm sorry for your loss. Things like photography diminish in importance at such a time.

    Larry
     
  10. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    Thanks for the tip John I think I already had the camera set up like that but will check again.
     
  11. Barry - Sounds good. Once you up the speed, I hope you get better results. I went through the left focus issue with my D800 so I know that focus issues can be troubling.
     
  12. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    Having come up through the Nikon ranks from D70s-D200-d300-D800 to the D810 By now I should know better after many years of taking photos. But I don't, it is still a learning curve with each camera .
    The D800 i had a hell of a lot of problems with the colour red, I think i posted about this before. Found out it was the camera in the end. After I dropped it and it went back for repair no more colour red problems, so it must have been the camera all the time.

    This D810 is definately down to this idiot not paying proper attention to settings and handling, have the same problem with the wife :banghead: 
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2018
  13. Barry - You are too hard on yourself. I can't tell you the number of times I haven't gotten the best out of my camera gear because of user error. I was up in Alaska and set my D810 to bracket and then forgot to take bracketing off. We were out with a guide and he couldn't figure why the exposure was off for the shots he took of my wife and me - duh on my part. Fortunately I was shooting in RAW and was able to make exposure adjustments so the images turned out ok but I certainly felt stupid when I realized my mistake back at the lodge. I went back through the series of posts and you certainly had your mind on other things when you were running the initial focus test. It's belated, but I'm sorry to hear about your friend; that kind of news is tough to take. When you get around to testing the focus with some new shots, I hope they turn out fine.
     
  14. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
  15. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    ieBEdyJ.jpg
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    Meachelham priory entrance in East sussex


    Unedited except changing from RAW to Jpeg
     
  16. Barry - I ran it through LR and, without knowing the settings, think that the AF worked fine. See attached photo with edits. I'll look forward to comments from other members.

    ieBEdyJ-1.jpg
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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  17. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    Thank you John.I deliberately didn't edit so anyone could check out the exif and have a play with it


    Again I didn't didn't check the camera settings before i started taking photos of the place. This time I had the camera on Movie mode, but this was a camera tryout not having used it "in the field" before so rather get used to it now than on an expensive holiday abroad we are taking in the next couple of months.

    This is the priory dating back over 700 years
    K22QZGS.jpg
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    E1MgNx0.jpg
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  18. The EXIF data was stripped out by your conversion program. There should be an option to retain it if you want to. Playing with a .jpg isn't as good as playing with the .NEF. The .jpg already has a lot of image data discarded and you can't get it back so you can't do as much withthe picture. Trying to determine whether focus is ok requires looking at the image at a larger scale.

    The pictures look fine apart from whatever tweaking you might want to do.

    Larry
     
  19. barry lloyd

    barry lloyd

    Jun 12, 2007
    UK
    Have you tried Kuso exif viewer ? Larry
     
  20. I don't have it. I have 2 exifviers as extensions in Firefox. I right click and choose one of them and the exif pops up. Neither worked on your pictures.
     
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