Red Bug

gho

Joined
Feb 7, 2005
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California
Hiya 'all

Okay, got meself some interceptor today to get rid of these nasty little buggers. I figured at least I can get out of this heartache is a photo op - I used direct lighting without modifiers to get a harsh source to enhance the bugs and make them stand out.

I always wondered whey they were called "red bugs" when in fact, they appeared yellow to the naked eye. Well now I know. These are parasitic crustaceans that suck the "juice" (actually slime layer) from corals causing discoloration, slow growth, poor polyp extention and eventually coral death.

Here's the pic, not as sharp as I'd like it. Any tips on lens reversals, maybe getting a bit closer?

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gho

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Ah, I forgot about a little perspective.

The photo's from my 29g tank (not very big, in fact referred to as a "nano" tank by the reefing community).

The photograph depicts the area circled in red:
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Not very large, in fact, smaller than a dime.
 
Joined
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Very interesting image Gregory. When I was doing extreem closeup's with a bellows I did use a reversing ring on my 55mm micro lens. It did seem to give sharper images. Your image is outstanding and the red bugs sure do stand out. Hope you can kill those pesky little critters.
 
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What a great illustration photo! It's very instructive that the most infested polyp in the photo is also the least extended and most discolored.

If you are using a micro lens intended for use near 1:1 then reversing it probably won't improve it's performance. On the other hand if the scene is much smaller than the sensor, then maybe it will.

Can you get physically closer, or are you right up against the glass?
 

gho

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Gordon, I'd like to know more about your bellows system. I was thinking of doing the same.

Chris, I used the 60mm/f2,8 - I wasn't thinking of reversing the macro lense, but my 28-85 or 18-70. I'm not sure. Do you think it would work?

I was right up against the glass. I'm not sure it would focus any closer either.

How do you get those 5:1 macros and stuff?
 
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gho said:
Gordon, I'd like to know more about your bellows system. I was thinking of doing the same.

Chris, I used the 60mm/f2,8 - I wasn't thinking of reversing the macro lens, but my 28-85 or 18-70. I'm not sure. Do you think it would work?

I was right up against the glass. I'm not sure it would focus any closer either.

How do you get those 5:1 macros and stuff?
You get closer than 1/1 with a macro by extending it further from the camera with extension tubes or a bellows. The bellows is by far the best because you have an almost infinite amount of extension. Most macro photographers suggest that you reverse your lens when using a bellows. With the above in mind, a bellow is not an inexpensive item. I sold mine on Ebay about a year ago and the bidding was hot. I also had a magnified viewfinder for my Nikon F3 body.
 

gho

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Which bellow did you have? I'd like to use bellows to, do you get issues with vignetting and stuff like that? What kind of lense would you recommend for the system. How much did you sell yours for? Man I wish you still had it :(

My F3 was stolen :(
 
Joined
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Unless you use a longer lens, a bellows would force you to get much closer. There is some sort of set-up where a zoom lens is mated with a prime lens via the filter rings, then the resulting hybrid lens is used as a super macro. I read about it a year or so ago on DPR.
 
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Chris101 said:
Unless you use a longer lens, a bellows would force you to get much closer. There is some sort of set-up where a zoom lens is mated with a prime lens via the filter rings, then the resulting hybrid lens is used as a super macro. I read about it a year or so ago on DPR.
Chris, you are right and I did that very thing by stacking two lenses with the macro reversed on the longer lens. I then used my bellows to magnify whatever it was I was taking. In my case that was crystalline substances on a slide using a double polarizer to turn everything black except the crystalline substance which would reflect beautiful colors and shapes.

Gregory, as I remember I sold it for something around $300.
 

gho

Joined
Feb 7, 2005
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California
Do you guys know which lenses to stack to do that? I'm really interested in getting sharp extreme macros.

Gordon, 300 smackers doesn't sound too bad - methinks I would have bought it. But if I can get away with stacking lenses, I'll try that first.
 

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