Returning to the hobby.........need a little guidance.

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Again, simply moving a file does NOT change the file name. Yes, you can change a file name at the same time, but that is a option....not a requirement.
Karen,
Of course you are absolutely right. I now see that others jumped on this statement too. Perhaps they share my opinion that ingestion is the first and best opportunity to change a file name and that doing so is commonly considered a useful practice. Thus, for the OP, whose interests are clearly regarding leveraging software to its fullest, the clarification about what can be done at the time of ingestion seems relevant.
 
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Thank you ALL for your help and guidance. I think, as suggested, I will just dive into the transfer and naming issue by using a few test images and start getting a better grip through experience. I just learned, "DOH", that I can simply insert my CF card into the reader and drag the images to my desired location without using transfer. Bunch of stuff to try.........
 
I don't change the names of any images at the time of initial transferring from card to computer; I simply drag-and-drop from the reader to the desktop and wait for the image files to arrive in the new folder. Only after removing the card from the SD card reader and putting it back into the camera and formatting it do I return to doing anything with the images. I change the name of the folder to something meaningful ("Shot on 10/10/2019"[usually when just a few images captured on a walk around the neighborhood] or "Meadowlark Gardens 07/20/2019") but still I don't rename the images. The only time I name the images is when I have processed and edited them, and at that point I'll name them ("Monarch Butterfly 1", Monarch Butterfly 2", "Peonies"). When I've completed editing, I'll have two folders, one of the RAW untouched images and the other of the edited images.

In my Pictures folder on the Mac I have a folder for each month in which I put the edited images, and another folder for (ahem) the files that need to be culled and processed, as well as a folder for Unprocessed and Processed iPhone and iPad images. If I've shot at an event, such as a concert, I'll have a specific folder for that, with subfolders within for different elements of it, such as prior to concert, concert itself, post-concert, M&G with the artist (either a formal one or at the stage door), etc.

Once I've finished with the editing process, I then upload to my Zenfolio gallery and then usually shift the folder(s) of completed work to one of my external SSDs.
 
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Only after removing the card from the SD card reader and putting it back into the camera and formatting it do I return to doing anything with the images.

It's great that that has worked for you so far, but that workflow is definitely not a best practice. If something happens to the image files on your computer before or while you make changes to them, you have already removed the originals from your memory card. Best to keep those originals on the memory card until, at the very least, the image files on your computer have been backed up elsewhere on your computer or, better yet, to an external drive.
 
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I see I omitted a step; I should have said that actually, yes, I do quickly take a look at the image files I've just transferred to the computer from the memory card BEFORE going ahead and blitzing the memory card. I just don't do an extensive review of them right then or attempt to cull them until later. Also if I've only shot a few images I don't bother to format the card right away, either. More importantly, in some special instances I don't clear the memory card immediately if the images are from a special event. I've got plenty of extra memory cards so no need to do that. For casual photos I've shot just walking around the lake or in the neighborhood, not as big a deal one way or the other. Each situation is different. That said, I've never experienced a corrupted memory card or a faulty transfer from card to computer, but, yep, there is always that first time!

When I travel, at the time of transferring the files from memory card to computer, I indeed do back them up right then and there with the external SSD I carry along for that purpose, and usually will leave the images on the memory card until I've returned home and the images are safely stashed in the main computer that I use for image processing.
 
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Thank you ALL for your help and guidance. I think, as suggested, I will just dive into the transfer and naming issue by using a few test images and start getting a better grip through experience. I just learned, "DOH", that I can simply insert my CF card into the reader and drag the images to my desired location without using transfer. Bunch of stuff to try.........
You’ll find that (depending on your computer), the direct import is anywhere from MUCH faster to exponentially faster. The Nikon import bridge is very inefficient.
 
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I think someone already talked about it, but I would recommend PhotoMechanic to bring all your images into the computer.

it’s the fastest program I know of to cull, caption, update IPTC data, keyword, and rename if you choose. Google it and see what it can do with Code Replacement, and I think they call them Variables.
 
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I think someone already talked about it, but I would recommend PhotoMechanic to bring all your images into the computer.

it’s the fastest program I know of to cull, caption, update IPTC data, keyword, and rename if you choose. Google it and see what it can do with Code Replacement, and I think they call them Variables.
I have heard good things about photomechanic and I think what intrigues me the most is how so many folks say that while you CAN ingest, cull, and rate with LR, PM is just soooooo much faster. For those of you that have used both PM and LR, is this your experience as well?
 
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The main difference between Lightroom and PhotoMechanic in the context of your question is that Lightroom has a database catalog and PhotoMechanic doesn't. Depending on your needs, that might make a difference between the ease and speed of finding images because finding images is the primary strength of a catalog.

My database catalog is IDimager PhotoSupreme, which I use for absolutely everything having to do with my images except capturing and post-processing them. I don't know how its speed compares with PhotoMechanic.

Be aware that when using a catalog database, certain functions will likely be a little slower than doing the same thing with a program that is not a catalog database. That's because the one program only has to update the image file or xmp file, whereas the program that includes a catalog database also has to update that database. As an example, if you change hundreds of filenames in a batch process, both the files and the information in the catalog database pertaining to every changed file have to be changed.
 
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Butlerkid

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Also, PM is great at some things, but I don't hear of folks using it exclusively for processing raw images. So, you end up using another software program as well, such as LR or PS - or DxO, Caputre One, or ........

Are you really going to be shooting hundreds or thousands of images and be on a time crunch to process them? Such as weddings with rapid response expectations, sports with news deadlines, or ?

PM may be faster, but I am retired and can afford an extra minute or more when working with my files. Even on trips where I might shoot 300-500 in a day, I don't find culling and rating to be terribly painful using PS's bridge. Images are uploaded from the card to my computer and then loaded into Bridge takes a few minutes. After that I can rate, sort, keyword and process my images individually or in batches.

BTW - LR and Bridge use essentially the same raw processor. LR is a data base program whereas Bridge is not.

Everyone has different needs. Make your decisions on your needs.
 
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So this may seem rather generic and obvious, but have you thought about whether your computer hardware is up to the demands of today's photography? If not all that software and filing protocols, regardless of flavor, will just bog down. Monitors need to provide accurate color, maybe also have AdobeRGB color space. Given the size of today's image files, fast processors and hard drives and a strong video card. Most photo processing software will work faster with multiple hard drives for cache and scratch discs in an RAID or JBOD. And of course back up discs. Sufficient power supply and latest USB format for fast file transfers. Build a strong foundation before you worry about software. I think of my camera as an extention of my computer, not the other way around. Good luck.
 

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