Revising history with Lightroom 2

Discussion in 'Retouching and Post Processing' started by Uncle Frank, Sep 12, 2008.

  1. Last edited by a moderator: Sep 12, 2008
  2. It's interesting to go back to older photos and have another go at the processing. I agree with you on the forst two, but to me the last one looks a little too cool in the rework. My monitor hasn't been calibrated for a few weeks, so that might be it.

    These are nice shots and I'm sure the bride will be happy to get them.
     
  3. Frank,

    I think it's good that you are approaching PP this way. It is interesting indeed to go back a few years and see how we can reprocess the images. I think you may have gone a bit too far in the change of white balance, and to my eye, the noise reduction is a tad overdone in the first two.

    You may have had slightly better results if you had the raw files available, but I am afraid that's too late for that... unless you want to work on the images I took of that wedding (as your second shooter)! :wink:
     
  4. Good to see you playing Frank - that is how I learn.
    The other comments have merit, it is easy to go too far with our processing!!
     

  5. I agree. Philippe pointed that out to me as well by PM. I've replaced it with a warmer version. Actually, the skin tones were pretty good. I just needed to reduce the blue channel. Here's the progression.

    original
    68186791.

    rev 1
    View attachment 252361

    rev 2
    View attachment 252362

    I'm still learning to adjust wb in RAW, but my original point was that LR2/ACR4.5 gives me latitude to re-edit jpgs, and this goes even further to prove the point.
     
  6. evokel

    evokel

    326
    Sep 6, 2008
    florida
    love the pics and the new versions
     
  7. I think Rev 2 looks much better. It's interesting that just tweaking the blue channel a bit could make that much difference. Great work.
     
  8. Yep Brian, adjustment of the primary channels of RGB is complimented by being able to adjust 8 colour ranges for hue/saturation and luminosity!!:wink:
     
  9. rgordin

    rgordin

    623
    Jun 3, 2008
    Washington, DC
    With software like this, how much benefit is there to shooting RAW vs. jpeg?
     
  10. There is are many plusses to raw files over jpeg in that they have much more information and it is the sensor information without alteration whereas jpeg is processed already.
    It is like using a negative or transparency to make a print from rather than a scan of a print made from the film.

    Hope that makes sense!!:biggrin:
     
  11. Richard,

    Like Frank said when he started this thread, Lightroom makes it easy to revise all of your images, Jpeg and Raw for me.

    Like Geoff said, working with the raw file is more like working from a negative. I would like to add it is like working from a negative and then some.

    With Raw you can apply profiles like "Landscape", "Portrait", "Neutral", "Vivid" to the same image. While when shooting JPEG you had your one chance in camera. With Raw you can change your mind later.

    The critical parts when shooting Raw are Lighting, Composition, Focus and Exposure. With Jpeg the critical parts are the same plus White Balance and adjustments to contrast in camera.

    While LR2 and other programs allow for quite a bit of flexibility with well exposed Jpeg files, with Raw you have a lot more lattitude. As raw processing improves, your old Raw files can have a new life and yield the best results available from the image file.

    I shoot a lot of Jpeg only, but when it is something I really need to make as good an image as possible I shoot Raw or at least Raw + Jpeg.

    And best of all, Lightroom 2 makes working with Raw files just about as easy and fast as working with Jpeg files. I've got Capture NX2 and use it for some images. However, I view, enjoy, sort, adjust and manage my images with LR2.
     
  12. rgordin

    rgordin

    623
    Jun 3, 2008
    Washington, DC
    This is very helpful. I have a free copy of Capture NX and am thinking of buying LR2. If I download RAW with Capture, I understand the camera picture settings (vivid, standard, etc,) will be saved. Will they then be lost if I transfer the photo to work on it further in LR2? Otherwise, does it make any sense to use both?

    I am confused and would appreciate some help. What camera settings are lost when you shoot in RAW and then use LR2?

    I have downloaded a trial version of LR2 and will try it after I read the manual a bit more.

    Thank you. I really need a bit of help.
     
  13. LR does not read the "In Camera" settings other than white balance. This is the same for all raw files from different brands. There are many pluses and minuses for this and is a personal preference.
    I convert the NEFs to DNG so as not to have .xmp "sidecar" files with the develop information in them. With DNG all the develop information can be stored within the file. I believe this may be what NX does with NEFs.
    As for the in camera settings, they are used to produce the jpegs as well as when using NX and NEFs they are available from within NX and are changeable.
    I may be old hat but having used transparency film a lot I don't change too much after developing in LR except for effects. I have created a preset that I apply on import to the DNG or NEF which meets the result I prefer. The preset has evolved as has my experience and I guess will evolve further.
    In the end it is choice and finding what works best for you. Give them both a go and discover what works for you.
    There are plenty here who will give advice on NX, that is not my domain so I would be happy to answer queries regarding LR.
    I made a choice to use Nikon many years ago and have stuck with it and now I know what to expect and how to get what I want. I started with PS version 2 and have stuck with the Adobe direction as that is what I know best.

    Thanks for your queries and questions......:smile::smile:
     
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