Roku on wi-fi?

Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,439
Location
SW Virginia
Looks like I'm going to have to purchase a Roku device and subscribe to one of the streaming services in order to get the ACC network this basketball season. A friend of mine who has one says Roku won't work with wi-fi so he uses a wired ethernet connection. That won't be possible for me, so am I just out of luck?
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
1,913
Location
Southern Cal
Jim,

I have 300 mbps internet service.
My router will produce wireless speeds at only 60 mbps max.
Wired connections at the router will produce 300+ mbps.
I also have an Eero Pro Mesh wireless system.
https://www.amazon.com/eero-Home-WiFi-System-Beacon/dp/B0713ZCT4N
It consists of a base unit which is connected by wire to the router the other two wireless units are positioned throughout the house to provide optimum coverage anywhere in the house. The two wireless Eero units are positioned by two television sets and provide perfect streaming service via wireless by communicating with the base unit which is wired to the router.
We have had both televisions streaming and my desktop computer hardwired to the router streaming video at the same time and they never skipped a beat.
When I perform a speed test at the wireless Eero units they provide a minimum of 250 mbps.
I feel this is due to the base unit being wired to the router.
This system has worked well for me and I highly recommend it.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
1,191
Location
Dubois, Wyoming
Real Name
Bill
Looks like I'm going to have to purchase a Roku device and subscribe to one of the streaming services in order to get the ACC network this basketball season. A friend of mine who has one says Roku won't work with wi-fi so he uses a wired ethernet connection. That won't be possible for me, so am I just out of luck?
That's odd. I've used a Roku stick on my home Wi-Fi and had no problems.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,439
Location
SW Virginia
Jim,

I have 300 mbps internet service.
My router will produce wireless speeds at only 60 mbps max.
Wired connections at the router will produce 300+ mbps.
I also have an Eero Pro Mesh wireless system.
https://www.amazon.com/eero-Home-WiFi-System-Beacon/dp/B0713ZCT4N
It consists of a base unit which is connected by wire to the router the other two wireless units are positioned throughout the house to provide optimum coverage anywhere in the house. The two wireless Eero units are positioned by two television sets and provide perfect streaming service via wireless by communicating with the base unit which is wired to the router.
We have had both televisions streaming and my desktop computer hardwired to the router streaming video at the same time and they never skipped a beat.
When I perform a speed test at the wireless Eero units they provide a minimum of 250 mbps.
I feel this is due to the base unit being wired to the router.
This system has worked well for me and I highly recommend it.
That looks like an excellent system, Dave, but awfully expensive. I'm trying to get by inexpensively since I'm pretty sure that Comcast will eventually provide the ACC network.

I also have 300+ Mbps internet service so that system would probably serve me well if I wanted to spring for it.

Thanks for the information.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
1,913
Location
Southern Cal
I'm hoping Richard may chime in tomorrow and have a more cost effective alternative to the mesh system I have.
I bought mine when they first came out but we use the internet heavily here. Maybe there are some more cost effective options to achieve the same results. I use it for work as well so it has been a fantastic tool for me.
 
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
6,630
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado
I have Comcast/Xfinity's bottom of the line internet service (75MB/s) and streaming works fine. No buffering, no slowdowns. I did have an issue with distance. The modem is upstairs and one of our two TVs is downstairs. Sometimes the downstairs Amazon Fire Stick would lose the connection. I substituted a Roku I had lying around and it was much more reliable but still lost connection every few days. The problem is that the budget modem/gateway/router that Xfinity provides with the budget internet service is, ahem, distance challenged. To get the better modem/gateway/router would cost me $20/month (to be fair, it comes with double the speed but I don't need it) so I sprang for the xFi pods. These create a mesh network which extends the existing Wi-Fi network. Xfinity had a grand opening for a new store and I got them for $50 off ($99 vs $149) and haven't had a dropped connection in almost a month. In my experience, internet speed (once you get over about 20MB/s) is not an issue for streaming. Signal strength for the WiFi network can be an issue depending on the modem/gateway, distances between the gateway and destination devices, and the layout/construction of your house.
 

Growltiger

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Joined
Apr 26, 2008
Messages
12,324
Location
Up in the hills, Gloucestershire, UK
I'm now sitting in front of the TV I want to stream to with my laptop. I just ran a speed test and get about 190 Mbps from the wireless signal.
That is impressive speed. Perhaps your TV is not far from your router, or you don't have thick brick or stone walls in between. I don't think you will have any problems.

If you had reported a poor wifi speed at the TV I would have said you had three options.
1. Ethernet cable. This is the best solution but the need to redecorate the house after drilling holes etc can be annoying. (I installed cables to every downstairs room during a major remodelling 18 years ago).
2. A modern mesh wifi as described already.
3. Homeplugs, also known as powerline networking. I have installed these in several houses with success. The first one plugs in next to your router and a short network cable connects to it. The remote one(s) plug in anywhere, such as next to your TV. Here is a recent example; TP-Link Powerline example
(I actually have one TP-Link pair myself, as my network cabling does not extend upstairs, and the main bathroom which is at the far end doesn't get a good wifi signal from any of the four wireless access points. This means that I now get good wifi while lying in the bath.)
 
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
8,770
Location
Clearwater, Florida
Jim, your Roku should work fine on your WiFi. I have three of them and they work in various parts of my home without any high powered mesh network. The only time it may get a bit laggy is if two folks are watching on different Rokus. This is pretty rare in my home and even then is not always an issue.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,439
Location
SW Virginia
Thanks, all, for the information/suggestions. My cable modem/router is on the second floor above the TV and about 20 feet away laterally. With wired connections to the router I get 300+ Mbps, and wi-fi is close to 200 Mbps near the TV. With just the two of us we will never be streaming to more than one device at a time (my wife wouldn't even know how to do that).

So I think I'll get the Roku and give it a try. If it doesn't work satisfactorily I can just return it or investigate some of the other options you all have recommended.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,230
Location
London
Good luck, it should work fine on Wifi.

(I have been an Apple TV/ Amazon Firestick TV user - for many many years -not Roku myself and never had any problems with either Wifi or homeplug connections.)
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2008
Messages
2,450
Location
Virginia Beach, Virginia USA
Real Name
Bill Mellen
We have been using a Roku over WiFi for years. Any later model Roku should work fine over WiFi. Our internet provider is Verizon FIOS.

Verizon recently upgraded us to a 75 mbs service and I am getting 80 + up and down on my iPhone, iPad and WiFi connected laptops. The same as the wired connection to this computer.
Needless to say, I am very happy with Verizon FIOS internet :)
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
477
Location
San Antonio, TX
Some rates are stated in bits/sec others in bytes/sec. my 20-30 million (mega) bytes/sec = 160-240 million bits/sec.
The cable company likes to quote the big numbers. 20 m-bytes/sec will drive your TV fine, but not several at once.

But if you have fiber coming to your house, and many do, the data rates are are truly in the hundreds of bytes/sec.
 

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