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Jul 8, 2019
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814
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SF Bay Area, California, USA
Couldn't you put in modern NiMH such as Eneloop? I have a 1970's TI56 which had two NiCd AA cells and has had Eneloops in it for a year or so.
I could, but two reasons for not doing it:
  • I don't trust the old NiCd charging mechanism to properly/safely charge NiMH batteries.
  • To use a NiMH charger, I would have to remove the batteries from the pack to charge them. And I would rather not stress the case, and risk cracking it, since the pack was not designed to remove the batteries.
On devices like flashes, where I can easily remove the batteries to charge them in a NiMH charger, I am using NiMH batteries in place of NiCd.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
814
Location
SF Bay Area, California, USA
Good point. Back in my day we weren't allowed to use programmable calculators to take the engineering licensing tests. Which at the time I thought it rather odd that engineers weren't allowed to demonstrate knowledge of tools of the trade.
In college, there were classes where we could not use a calculator to take exams.
When I took the CPA exam, back in the mid 70s, we could not use a calculator AT ALL.

As I understood it, it was to level the playing field, as some students could not afford a calculator. Back then even a simple 4-function calculator was NOT inexpensive. I think my first calculator in college was almost $300, and it was a pretty basic calculator. I only got the HP-22 when I was in grad school.
When I got the HP-22, I understood the other reason the profs and the CPA exam did not allow them. Rather than learning and knowing the various financial formulas, I could just punch the variables into the HP-22 and it would spit out the answer, without me having to know the formulas.
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
6,201
Location
Alaska
The level playing field issue never occurred to me. I was one of those who couldn't have afforded any of the programmable types back then. They were a couple hundred dollars at least. Which at the time would pay my monthly rent and utilities.
 
Joined
May 27, 2013
Messages
3,117
Location
Cornpatch
In college, there were classes where we could not use a calculator to take exams.
When I took the CPA exam, back in the mid 70s, we could not use a calculator AT ALL.

As I understood it, it was to level the playing field, as some students could not afford a calculator. Back then even a simple 4-function calculator was NOT inexpensive. I think my first calculator in college was almost $300, and it was a pretty basic calculator. I only got the HP-22 when I was in grad school.
When I got the HP-22, I understood the other reason the profs and the CPA exam did not allow them. Rather than learning and knowing the various financial formulas, I could just punch the variables into the HP-22 and it would spit out the answer, without me having to know the formulas.

Nowadays, for a c-note, a pack of 10 calculators can be purchased for testing.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
814
Location
SF Bay Area, California, USA
The level playing field issue never occurred to me. I was one of those who couldn't have afforded any of the programmable types back then. They were a couple hundred dollars at least. Which at the time would pay my monthly rent and utilities.
It wasn't a level field back then, me with my basic 4-function calculator, and someone else with an HP financial calculator.
I did not even have a square root key on my calculator. I did not realize how much it hurt not to have that key.

I remember in college some of the students talking about how they could code a crib sheet into some of those programmable calculators.

What I did find odd in my high school math classes was, we could not use a slide rule.
And I don't mean the expensive bamboo ones, I mean the cheap plastic ones. Mine was the cost of two hamburgers. So pretty affordable. But we had students from families on food stamps, so the disparity was still there.

Today, if you don't have a computer with internet access, as a student you are crippled. And with "distance learning," a computer and internet access is mandatory. When school started this year, there were a lot of students who signed out laptops and WiFi hot spots, because they did not have a computer and internet access. Disparity still exists.
Although I think some of those students had previously just used their phones to do everything. I have no idea how they could write a term paper on a phone, but I was told that many students did that. :confused:
 

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