Sad story from the Osprey nest

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The first image in this set is of the entire Osprey family, female and male adults with the three chicks. Well, a lot of things have changed since I took this image about a week ago. When I visited the nest yesterday there were only two chicks in the nest and the female was nowhere to be seen, the last time she was seen was over a week ago. That’s not good, probably an eagle got her, or she hurt herself and was unable to get back to the nest. Further troubling news, there were only two chicks in the nest. Apparently, while doing a wing flapping exercise a gust of wind caught one of the chicks blowing it off the nest. Fortunately, it was quickly grabbed and taken to a wildlife rescue agency. Not sure what they’ll do with the chick or how they plan to get it back in the wild but was told once they are assured it can fly, they will take it back to the nest area and release it.
In photographing the nest yesterday, the male made one appearance over a 4-hour span, flew in over the nest and dropped a small fish and continued without landing. The two chicks were jumping about a foot or so off the nest flapping their wings, I’m sure they are within days of fledging.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
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Louie
 

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Butlerkid

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Surely the female would have returned to the nest if at all possible. Sad. I am blown away by the colors and fine details of these images!!! #2 is particularly stunning!
 
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Great photos.
It's amazing what a derogatory impact a couple degrees has on the environment. Apparently over a Billion shellfish got cooked during low tide on the BC coast.
 
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I assume this is the same nest as the previous photos. Louie knows what I mean.
"I've been following the activity at this particular nest all season, unfortunately this is the only one that survived the heat wave we had a few weeks ago"
 
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Surely the female would have returned to the nest if at all possible. Sad. I am blown away by the colors and fine details of these images!!! #2 is particularly stunning!
Thanks very much Karen. I plan on visiting the nest sometime this week to see what the latest is with the chicks and certainly the one chick that fell out of the nest and the adult male. Sad to see this happen because this was the only nest out of three in the area that didn't have the chicks perish during the heat wave we had recently.
 

Butlerkid

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I assume this is the same nest as the previous photos. Louie knows what I mean.
"I've been following the activity at this particular nest all season, unfortunately this is the only one that survived the heat wave we had a few weeks ago"
Thanks for explaining. I thought the intense heat Louie referred to was more than a couple of degrees and didn't understand the reference to marine life.
 
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Great photos.
It's amazing what a derogatory impact a couple degrees has on the environment. Apparently over a Billion shellfish got cooked during low tide on the BC coast.
Thanks West. It really is amazing what a few degrees hotter can have on wildlife in general but specifically young chicks in the nest. I'm sure we suffered a huge loss in shellfish as well, just not sure of the degree of loss. Will give an update on the chicks after my visit this week.
 

JLH

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Birders know the cruel truth about bird life cycles. They are short. Of course larger preditor birds actually do much better than say common 'song" birds but even so the number that make it from egg to say two or three years old is small. We have a pond and a very tree filled yard. From our deck on the second floor we have a line of sight to many of the nests. Its sad to see the eggs hatch, see those little heads pop out and then watch as the numbers decline as the days go by. Same for the ducks in our pond. Mom will have seven hatchlings, so fun to watch, but then it seems every few days there is one less. In the end if lucky if one or two of the babies make it to adulthood. Of course we have these happy foxes running around at night.....
A wolf, a stout creature, only has on average a five year life span in the wild. Same animal will last years in captivity. But one might reflect that five years in the wild might be better than fifteen in a preserve. Maybe not. Life in the wild is a real struggle for all animals.
Sorry for the missing mom and chick. Its always sad to see one go.
 
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You can only hope that they are strong enough now, as we are heading into another 100F plus week.
Thanks West, I think they should be able to deal with the hot weather by now especially if they have fledged. This wave of heat we're experiencing is having a real adverse effect on a lot of wildlife.
 
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Great series and I see by your later post the female has returned. They often aren't far away, just well hidden by foliage and watching. A local nest was missing the male for several days and after she lost her mate mid-season a few years ago, it seemed like a repeat. He popped back up after a few days, not sure if she was angry he was gone or glad he was back as she had to do all the fishing for the duration. As for the young one, the local rehabbers all say the same thing: Birds are best raised by birds! If that youngster were here, it would be checked out overnight, fluids and some pain meds and then returned to the nest ASAP. Osprey don't do well in captivity, they mostly refuse to eat. The young ones are a little easier as they are still accustomed to being fed; they need fresh fish (not previously frozen) and if it has been dead too long they seem to know.
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Messages
21,952
Location
Newcastle, Washington
Birders know the cruel truth about bird life cycles. They are short. Of course larger preditor birds actually do much better than say common 'song" birds but even so the number that make it from egg to say two or three years old is small. We have a pond and a very tree filled yard. From our deck on the second floor we have a line of sight to many of the nests. Its sad to see the eggs hatch, see those little heads pop out and then watch as the numbers decline as the days go by. Same for the ducks in our pond. Mom will have seven hatchlings, so fun to watch, but then it seems every few days there is one less. In the end if lucky if one or two of the babies make it to adulthood. Of course we have these happy foxes running around at night.....
A wolf, a stout creature, only has on average a five year life span in the wild. Same animal will last years in captivity. But one might reflect that five years in the wild might be better than fifteen in a preserve. Maybe not. Life in the wild is a real struggle for all animals.
Sorry for the missing mom and chick. Its always sad to see one go.
Thanks very much for taking a look and responding in the manner you have. Happy to report that the female has shown back up, where she had gone anybody's guess.
Very sad, nature is unrelenting, hope the rest will be ok. Nice images though in tough light. Its very smoky here this morning, with a red sun.
Thanks Andreas.
Great series and I see by your later post the female has returned. They often aren't far away, just well hidden by foliage and watching. A local nest was missing the male for several days and after she lost her mate mid-season a few years ago, it seemed like a repeat. He popped back up after a few days, not sure if she was angry he was gone or glad he was back as she had to do all the fishing for the duration. As for the young one, the local rehabbers all say the same thing: Birds are best raised by birds! If that youngster were here, it would be checked out overnight, fluids and some pain meds and then returned to the nest ASAP. Osprey don't do well in captivity, they mostly refuse to eat. The young ones are a little easier as they are still accustomed to being fed; they need fresh fish (not previously frozen) and if it has been dead too long they seem to know.
Appreciate your kind words and your story of Osprey.
 

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