Seeking recommendations for color printer

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Mar 25, 2005
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near Montreal, Canada
You'll love it Rich!
Canon Pro-100 for me also for my Mac on Yosemite. I only use OEM ink and I make my own profiles for the various papers I use (mostly Ilford Galerie Classic Pearl for general prints and Hahnemühle Satin Rag for special fine art prints.
Prints are absolutely gorgeous with incredible color accuracy.
 
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In my experience OEM means off retail; sold in a vinyl bag, not in a box, without instructions. OEM and normally at a considerable discount and are intended to be included by manufacturers of original equipment (OEM) in larger assemblies. Somehow the items manage to make it to the market. That's the reason for the confusion.

Thanks, Rich
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2005
Messages
12,515
Location
near Montreal, Canada
In my experience OEM means off retail; sold in a vinyl bag, not in a box, without instructions. OEM and normally at a considerable discount and are intended to be included by manufacturers of original equipment (OEM) in larger assemblies. Somehow the items manage to make it to the market. That's the reason for the confusion.

Thanks, Rich
Thanks Rich, now that you mention this I do remember that wrt electronic equipment notably computer and related equipment. In my business (large electricity generation equipment) it commonly relates to components from the original manufacturer.
I understand the confusion I caused wrt the subject at hand :oops:.
 

Growltiger

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Long ago OEM used to mean not made by the branded seller. But so many people misunderstood it, over the years it changed its meaning and now doesn't mean anything for certain.

Here is Wikipedia's attempt to explain it:

Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) is a term used when one company makes a part or subsystem that is used in another company's end product. The term is used in several ways each of which is clear in context. It can refer to a part or subsystems maker, an end product producer, or an automotive part that is manufactured by the same company that produced the original part used in assembly.

Generally, an OEM is the company that makes a part that is marketed by another company typically as a component of the second company's product.[1] For example, if Acme Manufacturing Co. makes power cords that are used on IBM computers, Acme is the OEM.

Confusingly, OEM can sometimes also refer to companies like value-added resellers. If, for example, Hewlett-Packard sells circuit boards to Acme Systems for use in Acme's security systems, HP refers to Acme as an OEM.[2][3][4]

When referring to auto parts, OEM refers to parts and manufacturers involved in the final assembly of a vehicle—in contrast to whoever made aftermarket parts that were installed later. For example, if Ford used Autolite spark plugs, Exide batteries, Bosch fuel injectors, and Ford's own engine blocks and heads when building a car, then car restorers and collectors consider all of those brands as OEM brands, in contrast to aftermarket brands (such as Champion plugs, DieHard batteries, Kinsler fuel injectors, and BMP engine blocks and heads). This can mean that Bosch injectors, for example, are considered OEM parts on one car model and aftermarket parts on another model.
 
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Back in the days when I would build ip PCs from parts we could go to a swap meet and buy OEM CPUs for well below store prices along with memory, hard drives, cases and power supplies. The the bottom dropped out when PCs saturated the market. No more computer flea markets around here. Fortunately we have Micro Center in Fairfax county VA so life is still good.

Rich
 
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Chicago, IL
I never understood using Bill's midnight ink supply to refill a cartridge in an expensive printer. I ran a printer support group and saw far too many times a refilled cartridge trashed an expensive printer. Sort of like buying a $6,000 camera and using a knockoff battery.... Works great until it doesn't and then....
 
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Of course with a new printer I'll have to learn all about profiling......again... and again. Sigh it never ends!

Rich
Printer profiling is the ultimate last step towards high quality prints.
This after you have the camera (which I profile also), a calibrated monitor, a top notch printer as well as high quality paper. After all of that you are missing out if you don't have proper printer profiles for the various papers.
Many printers - as does the Pro-100 - have canned profiles available from the manufacturer for the various papers (IF you use their ink. This goes out the window if you use other ink). Better than nothing, but I firmly believe in making my own custom profiles. It would be a shame after investing in quality camera gear, computer and printer only to leave out the last step and get iffy results - at best.
I use the ColorMunki Photo spectrophotometer with which I calibrate my monitor and make my printer profiles. It provides excellent results and is easy to use. Much easier than earlier spectrophotometers which gave me cramped fingers for needing to individually read each color patch.
The Pro-100 combined with my fully calibrated approach provides me with prints that are out of this world and reflect the investment I made into photography.
 
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Northeast USA
I never understood using Bill's midnight ink supply to refill a cartridge in an expensive printer. I ran a printer support group and saw far too many times a refilled cartridge trashed an expensive printer. Sort of like buying a $6,000 camera and using a knockoff battery.... Works great until it doesn't and then....
I'm in the complete opposite camp... I use precision inks - have been for many many years - and have never had a problem with the printer, carts or ink. If you have deep pockets - yes.. OEM is the way to go... if you like to print and want to save some $$$ - but good quality 3rd party and put fears to rest. In the end - if my printer did have an issue after 4 years of use - I'd have no worries just picking up another used one (for $75 like Rich did which was a great score!).
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
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Clearwater
I'm in the complete opposite camp... I use precision inks - have been for many many years - and have never had a problem with the printer, carts or ink. If you have deep pockets - yes.. OEM is the way to go... if you like to print and want to save some $$$ - but good quality 3rd party and put fears to rest. In the end - if my printer did have an issue after 4 years of use - I'd have no worries just picking up another used one (for $75 like Rich did which was a great score!).
Like you I have been refilling for well over 2 years without an issue. The Pixma Pro 100 uses Canon CLI-42 cartridges which are not hard, nor messy to refill if you know what you are doing, do your research, and are a hands on type person! I have probably refilled the entire set of 8 CL-42 carts, at least 25 times (just ordered and rec'd another set of Precison Color ink bottles). B&H and others sell the replacement cartridges for ~$120 each set, and each individual CLI-42 alone costs about $15~20. My savings are a few $1000 now, by refilling!! Canon ink is top notch as is their paper and printer, but I believe the Precision Color ink I have used is equal to the Canon ink in quality. They offer the ICC profiles for their ink, and have a great deal of information on their site....highly recommended for anyone considering refilling. Canon Pro Platinum paper is the best I have used for my prints, so Canon has certainly got a few $ from me. Red River Paper has a place on their site where they give ink cost per sheet for different printers, the Pixma Pro 100 Canon ink costs $2.38 per 13" by 19" not including paper!!

Refilling is not for everyone, but if you print a lot, then it's worth considering. BTW I have no affiliation with Precision Colors, they just provide quality ink, cleaned carts, documentation and support for those that refill.

Best,

Mike
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
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Like you I have been refilling for well over 2 years without an issue. The Pixma Pro 100 uses Canon CLI-42 cartridges which are not hard, nor messy to refill if you know what you are doing, do your research, and are a hands on type person! I have probably refilled the entire set of 8 CL-42 carts, at least 25 times (just ordered and rec'd another set of Precison Color ink bottles). B&H and others sell the replacement cartridges for ~$120 each set, and each individual CLI-42 alone costs about $15~20. My savings are a few $1000 now, by refilling!! Canon ink is top notch as is their paper and printer, but I believe the Precision Color ink I have used is equal to the Canon ink in quality. They offer the ICC profiles for their ink, and have a great deal of information on their site....highly recommended for anyone considering refilling. Canon Pro Platinum paper is the best I have used for my prints, so Canon has certainly got a few $ from me. Red River Paper has a place on their site where they give ink cost per sheet for different printers, the Pixma Pro 100 Canon ink costs $2.38 per 13" by 19" not including paper!!

Refilling is not for everyone, but if you print a lot, then it's worth considering. BTW I have no affiliation with Precision Colors, they just provide quality ink, cleaned carts, documentation and support for those that refill.

Best,

Mike

Using refilled ink probably cost less than 10 cents per 13" by 19" page for ink!!

Canon Printer...yes, Canon paper......yes, Canon ink...sometimes, Canon Camera/Lens....no Nikon!!

Mike
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
144
Location
Clearwater
Like you I have been refilling for well over 2 years without an issue. The Pixma Pro 100 uses Canon CLI-42 cartridges which are not hard, nor messy to refill if you know what you are doing, do your research, and are a hands on type person! I have probably refilled the entire set of 8 CL-42 carts, at least 25 times (just ordered and rec'd another set of Precison Color ink bottles). B&H and others sell the replacement cartridges for ~$120 each set, and each individual CLI-42 alone costs about $15~20. My savings are a few $1000 now, by refilling!! Canon ink is top notch as is their paper and printer, but I believe the Precision Color ink I have used is equal to the Canon ink in quality. They offer the ICC profiles for their ink, and have a great deal of information on their site....highly recommended for anyone considering refilling. Canon Pro Platinum paper is the best I have used for my prints, so Canon has certainly got a few $ from me. Red River Paper has a place on their site where they give ink cost per sheet for different printers, the Pixma Pro 100 Canon ink costs $2.38 per 13" by 19" not including paper!!

Refilling is not for everyone, but if you print a lot, then it's worth considering. BTW I have no affiliation with Precision Colors, they just provide quality ink, cleaned carts, documentation and support for those that refill.

Best,

Mike

If anyone is considering using Precision Color refill inks, please review their site and follow their advise. There has been some reported print head clogs with older ink formulas, especially yellow, magenta and photo magenta.
 
Joined
Feb 7, 2005
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1,027
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Annandale, VA
I guess if the printer costs $100 or so, what the heck.... Use the cheapest ink. But, if more expensive printers, I still do not see the cost/downside advantage.
I've owned lots of printers two of which were expensive and one mid range one, all Epsons. All clogged at one time or another. The best luck I had was with the 3800 but with that one I took special precautions covering the printer with a large towel each time I finished using it. What annoyed me was the amount of ink the printers used 'cleaning' the print heads each time I turned it on. With one (a 4800 IIRC) the ink catcher filled up after I had gone through the cartridge set once! At $450 for a set of eight that is a lot of waste!

In truth I have never used 3rd party refillable inks and won't pontificate but considering the amount of money I've spent on ink which found itself in the waste cartridge I'm willing to take a chance. The fact that there is a lot of experience with this particular ink supplier and it's very positive it's worth the risk. On the other hand I find it difficult to defend printer manufacturers who put special circuitry in each ink cartridge to frustrate users using other brand cartridges or inks, charge very high prices for it and then consign so much of the ink to the junk pile...and then warn about the dangers of other products. Auto manufacturers used to do that with their branded oil and warn that using other brands voided their car's warranty till the laws changed that. Can you spell 'cash cow?'

Rich
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2007
Messages
749
Location
Milton, Ontario, Canada
I just picked up a Pixima Pro 100 and set it up this weekend. I haven't printed anything yet, but I am excited to do so. I got the printer for $299.99 here in Canada, I also bought some paper and a complete set of inks as well.
 

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