Sensor size and focus stacking -- LOTS ABOUT FOCUS STACKING

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Focusing on the feet assumes hand holding.

I might be old fashioned but I am addicted to using my tripod and panosaurus and not being able to see the view before me when starting the focus shift is a problem. I will probably stick with the D750 and 24mm f1.8 for panoramas.

DG
 

Growltiger

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I took a dislike to tripods some years ago and have never needed one since.
My camera when used with its 12-100 lens (24-200 equivalent 35mm) takes sharp handheld photos at 1/4 second every time, 1/2 second almost always, and about one time in 5 when at 1 second.
Hard to believe I know, and my hands are not that steady.

Did you take a look at my panoramas?
 
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Update regarding the difference between the Nikon and Olympus approaches.

Olympus uses "Bracketing" because you start in the middle and take shots either side whereas Nikon starts at the closest focus and works toward infinity. So the Nikon cannot really be Bracketing - can it?

See this brief Video (don't be fooled by the title):
 
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Update regarding the difference between the Nikon and Olympus approaches.

Olympus uses "Bracketing" because you start in the middle and take shots either side whereas Nikon starts at the closest focus and works toward infinity. So the Nikon cannot really be Bracketing - can it?
Olympus does both 'Focus Stacking', and 'Focus Bracketing', Nikon just does the one
 
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So the Nikon cannot really be Bracketing - can it?
No. That's why Nikon cals it Focus Stacking.
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On the other hand, exposure bracketing on most modern Nikon bodies can be ordered 2 ways:
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Semantics?
 
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And CamRanger, which like Nikon doesn't do focus stacking (only does focus bracketing), also calls it focus stacking. There is simply no standard being followed in the industry.
But does it really matter? Both/all produce a series of differentially focused images that can be combined into 1. To Nikon's credit, it is achieved by shifting focus (y)
 
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But does it really matter?
The distinction between focus shifting and focus bracketing wouldn't matter aside from that Nikon's lone decision to call it shifting has caused a lot of confusion. The distinction between focus bracketing/shifting and focus stacking always matters because they are completely different functions. It would be reasonable to assume from your screenshot that focus stacking and focus bracketing are the same. [EDIT: I intended to write that it would be reasonable to assume that focus stacking and focus shifting are the same.] However, they are not remotely the same.

I believe terminology that causes confusion matters. Words really do matter.
 
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It would be reasonable to assume from your screenshot that focus stacking and focus bracketing are the same
NO! Nikon does not use the term Focus Bracketing at all.

In my mind focus SHIFTING and focus BRACKETING are different (rival) 2 processes that have been designed to achieve, among other things, focus STACKING ( the end result). That end result is to produce a series of differentially focused images that can be combined into.
No confusion here.
 
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In my mind focus SHIFTING and focus BRACKETING are different (rival) 2 processes that have been designed to achieve, among other things, focus STACKING ( the end result)...
No confusion here.
I understand that it's not confusing to you but it's clearly confusing to a lot of people.

You mentioned that the two process are designed to achieve other things. What other things?
 
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I understand that it's not confusing to you but it's clearly confusing to a lot of people.
I was confused too, until I organized the terms into processes and product.

You mentioned that the two process are designed to achieve other things. What other things?
I was thinking that someone mentioned another use for multiple shots, besides perfect focus, but it may have been a phantom memory!
 

Growltiger

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Update regarding the difference between the Nikon and Olympus approaches.

Olympus uses "Bracketing" because you start in the middle and take shots either side whereas Nikon starts at the closest focus and works toward infinity. So the Nikon cannot really be Bracketing - can it?
You are completely incorrect/misinformed.

Olympus Focus Bracketing does not start in the middle. It starts at the current point of focus and goes steadily further away. Exactly the same as Nikon's Focus shift.

You may be confusing it with Olympus Focus Stacking. It takes up to 15 photos are does the stacking in the camera, giving the end result immediately (well after 30 seconds).
The focus stacking takes the first photo at the current focus point then gloes closer, then steadily further away.

In brief.
1. Focus Bracketing is the same as Nikon's Focus Shift. Both of those require the use of a computer to do the Focus Stacking afterwards.
2 If your camera has Focus Stacking it does the whole thing without needing a computer.
3. Some charlatans advertise products as doing focus stacking when they just do bracketing. Report them.
 
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Olympus Focus Bracketing does not start in the middle.
That being the case, the video is very misleading. The guy explicitly tells the user to focus the camera in the middle of the subject to begin capturing the series of images.

The manual (version 4) for the Olympus E-M1 explains focus bracketing as follows: "Focus moves successively farther from the initial focus position."
 
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I was thinking that someone mentioned another use for multiple shots
I suppose it's possible that a photographer would want to take a series of photos, each having about the same depth of field and each having a different focus point, for the purpose of later choosing which single photo is the keeper. As an example, I sometimes take a series of photos, each having a different depth of field and each having the same focus point, and later choose which photo is the keeper.
 
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Thanks Richard for the input, and the tactful way in which you presented it.

However, I am a little confused as to why at least one commentator on Youtube suggests that the initial point of focus should not be minimum focus because the camera focuses closer before starting the series?

Perhaps these videos are out of date and an update from someone such as yourself would be beneficial. It is possible to SEE the Focusing taking place on a Nikon Z setup - perhaps a video showing what happens with the Olympus would help?

DG
 
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Some charlatans advertise products as doing focus stacking when they just do bracketing.
The manual for the CamRanger Mini, an external device that controls the camera through a smart phone, explicitly describes how to do the focus bracketing but inaccurately identifies it as focus stacking. The manual doesn't mention anything about true focus stacking. CamRanger is a widely used, highly respected company and it's a shame that it uses incorrect terminology, which adds to the confusion.
 

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