Sensor size and focus stacking -- LOTS ABOUT FOCUS STACKING

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I have decided to put all of my focus bracketing and focus stacking options on hold at least for awhile.

Even so, it has been prudent to seriously consider my options now as part of my decision-making process about buying a new camera system this year or no later than next year. (My current camera is about ten years old). This thread has been highly informative and helpful toward that end. When combined with my other research and with immense help from Richard (Growltiger as always!), I have come to the following conclusions in no order of importance:
  • I have no immediate need to do any focus bracketing and stacking. That's mostly because I have enough new photo interests in the earliest stage of my learning curve going on these days. They include doing water drop photography and using textures in my tabletop photography.
  • I can be happy doing my own focus stacking using external software rather than requiring a camera body or an external device controlled by a smart phone to make that happen.
  • Whatever camera system I purchase, it will include automatic focus bracketing built into the camera body.
  • If enough time goes by before I buy my next camera system, I might buy one of the less expensive external devices (Camfi Pro or CamRanger Mini) to do the focus bracketing.
  • Coming to the above conclusions has helped me narrow down my next camera body to two choices (Nikon Z6 or D780), though I'm open-minded to the possibility of a third viable choice coming on the market by the time I actually buy a new system.
 
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The reliable rumour is only that Olympus will have a new camera. It is likely that it won't be the E-M1 III, despite the fake Photoshopped logos and other internet nonsense that is circulating.
If that is the case, and you are correct, then my next purchase will be simple. Nothing like a one horse race to help with the decision making :)

I was out chasing fungi in the middle of summer yesterday. Goes to show how the current extreme conditions we’re having in Australia is having an impact. Quite amazing how green the country side is after the recent heavy rains. I’ve seen a number of photos from some of the fire affected areas already starting to rejuvenate.

The leeches were out in force, I wasn’t expecting them to be so bad at this time of the year. I did do a lot of focus stacks, although not as many as I would in autumn and winter, but it was good practice none the less.
 

Growltiger

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Leeches are fun to play with. Have you got any good photos of them?

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Growltiger

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You should learn to enjoy them, I photograph everything. (I know it isn't very nice when you find blood trickling down your back.)
Here is a tiger leech. Note the spotted markings.

1579984122794.png
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The reliable rumour is only that Olympus will have a new camera. It is likely that it won't be the E-M1 III, despite the fake Photoshopped logos and other internet nonsense that is circulating.
The rumours are on the increase...not long to wait until the Feb 12 reported announcement to find out for sure

https://www.43rumors.com/

Here comes the leaked press text of the new E-m1III:



In combination with the new image processing engine TruePic IX, a 20.4 Megapixel Live MOS sensor, and an extensive line-up of high-resolution M.Zuiko lenses, the 5-axis IS ensures minimal noise even at high-sensitivity settings and top-class image quality with minimal distortion up to the edges of the shot.
For users in need of higher resolutions, the 50MP Handheld High Res Shot feature makes it possible to capture approximately 50 Megapixel high-resolution images without using a tripod. The Tripod High Res Shot function allows for recording ultra high-resolution (approx. 80 Megapixel equivalent) RAW and JPEG images.

When synchronizing the in-lens image stabilization of supported lenses with the in-body 5-axis image stabilization, the E-M1 Mark III achieves the world’s best stabilization performance of 7.5 shutter speed steps of compensation with 5-axis sync IS. This level of stabilization enables shooting in dark locations and during super-telephoto photography without a tripod, opening up new possibilities for photographers and filmmakers. Without sync IS, the in-body image stabilization ensures image stabilization with any attached Micro Four Thirds lens of up to 7.0 shutter speed steps compensation.

The OM-D E-M1 Mark III is equipped with a 121-point all cross-type On-chip Phase Detection AF sensor for focusing on various areas of the screen. It offers 75% vertical coverage and 80% horizontal coverage of the screen for a wide focusing area. Paired with an advanced AF algorithm, this feature can continually focus on fast-moving subjects with a high degree of precision. Unlike DSLR cameras, there is no degradation in AF precision when using a fast lens. The E-M1 Mark III offers high-precision focusing that can sufficiently bring out the capabilities even of large-diameter lenses such as those with a maximum aperture of f1.2.

AF/AE tracking is possible at maximum 18 fps high-speed sequential shooting while maintaining the full pixel count of 20.4 Megapixels. The subject can also be checked in the viewfinder during high-speed sequential shooting for accurate tracking.

A multi selector makes it possible to quickly shift AF areas with your thumb while looking through the viewfinder. Because users can move the AF areas with the multi selector during sequential shooting, it is possible to accurately focus even on subjects that move erratically, as e.g. often found in wildlife photography. The AF target loop setting is also added, which, based on user selection, either stops the AF target at the edge of the screen or moves it to the opposite edge.

Face Priority / Eye Priority AF, which automatically detects and focuses on people’s faces and eyes, is now more advanced. The new image processor TruePic IX features higher processing capabilities and improved AF algorithms to better detect small faces and eyes, whilst keeping stable focusing on a subject even in situations where face detection was difficult in the past (such as e.g. focusing on the sides of faces). It is now also possible to use either the buttons or touch operations to select faces when shooting still images or videos, and detection on or off can be changed with the touch of a single button. Along with versatile video functions, this feature makes the E-M1 Mark III a great tool for vloggers.

Starry Sky AF, which is new for the OM-D E-M1 Mark III, is a feature that will revolutionize the world of astrophotography. In the past, photographers have traditionally relied on manual focusing. A new algorithm was developed to enable accurate focusing even on the tiniest stars shining in the night sky, enabling ultra high-precision autofocusing. One of two modes in Starry Sky AF is the Speed Priority mode (default setting), which prioritizes focusing speed and complete AF operations in a short period of time. Thanks to the powerful image stabilization, this feature makes handheld astrophotography possible using a wide angle lens. The second mode Accuracy Priority (PR) uses a fine-tuned focus scan and is effective for shooting specific stars with telephotorumors lenses.

With Olympus advanced SSWF (Super Sonic Wave Filter) technology (which vibrates the image sensor filter with an acceleration of several thousand G 30,000 times per second to powerfully shake off dust and dirt) and a new sensor coating introduced with the OM-D E-M1X, dirt cannot stick to the sensor, reducing spots in images to 1/10th of that in conventional models. The high-durability shutter unit in the E-M1 Mark III clears 400,000 operation tests and therefore offers a high level of reliability.

The E-M1 Mark III features an IS mode specifically designed for video recording. Electronic stabilization combined with in-body 5-axis stabilization delivers powerful image stabilization particularly useful for videographers. This provides a high level of performance for handheld video content creation without using a tripod or other stabilizing device, even when shooting in high-resolution formats, which are susceptible to the effects of camera shake, such as 4K or Cinema 4K (C4K).

This model supports OM-Log400 shooting, which enables shooting without loss of details in shadows and highlights, along with color grading for a high degree of freedom over images. In order to make Live View images more visible, a View Assist function is available, which converts the color gamut to Full HD standard BT.709 equivalent for display.

The rugged magnesium alloy body of the OM-D E-M1 Mark III features Olympus acclaimed dust-, splash- and freeze-proof design to allow for shooting in any location and environment.

The OI.Share smartphone app can be used to connect to the camera via Wi-Fi, import shooting data to a smartphone, and to use the smartphone for remote camera operation. OI.Share can now also be used to update the camera firmware and backup and restore camera settings for the OM-D E-M1 Mark III.

Olympus Workspace can handle professional tasks such as RAW processing and image editing, along with offering a great deal of freedom over screen layout, etc. Connect a computer to the OM-D E-M1 Mark III via USB to enable high-speed RAW processing with Olympus Workspace using the new image processor TruePic IX. Clarity and Dehaze editing filters are included for a greater range of expression in astrophotography, etc.

By using Olympus Workspace Version 1.3, being released at the same time as the OM-D E-M1 Mark III, it makes it easy to replace the audio files of the recorded video to High res sound recorded by using Slate Tone on the LS-P4 / LS-100 while recording video.

This control software for computers meets the demands of studio photography. When using the software, live shooting results can be imported via Wi-Fi without using a USB connection, providing powerful support for the workflow of studio shooting. It supports high-speed 5 GHz band communication.

Dimensions:134.1 x 90.9 x 68.9 mm
Weight:504g
 

Growltiger

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The rumours are on the increase...not long to wait until the Feb 12 reported announcement to find out for sure

https://www.43rumors.com/
I'm still doubtful. That "leaked" press release seems to show minimal advances over the E-M1 II. Better support for small faces and starry skies and a few other things is surely too little to justify a new version. Most of the release refers to features in the current model.
As you say, we will soon see.
 
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I'm still doubtful. That "leaked" press release seems to show minimal advances over the E-M1 II. Better support for small faces and starry skies and a few other things is surely too little to justify a new version. Most of the release refers to features in the current model.
As you say, we will soon see.
I wonder if the current processing and memory are maxed out with the EM-1 II? Using the same body and updating a few key components might give them a longer run by adding additional functionality via firmware updates. Smaller investment in R&D, at the same time allowing Olympus to keep the camera updated in line with the other manufactures new releases.
 
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Joined
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Location
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Joined
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Messages
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Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Now that I've got a whopping one week of experience doing focus bracketing and stacking, I've learned what I like and don't like regarding when and when not to use it. I like using it in two situations: when the image is either entirely in focus or is partially in focus and the details behind the farthest part that is in focus are either very plain or relatively very distant. I dislike using it when the scene is partially in focus and the area immediately behind the farthest part that is in focus displays detail. That's because that rear part that is out of focus is too out of focus; normally it would be only slightly out of focus.
 

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