Critique Serengeti landscape

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Moderator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
21,374
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
Thought I'd try this one as a B&W....... Your thoughts?

_8504090_BW-X3.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

The Color version is HERE....
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
16,741
Like Mike said. A perfect candidate for b&w.
And very well executed, Karen! Beautiful in b&w.
Just curious: did you start from the colour version you linked to or from the original?
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Moderator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
21,374
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Like Mike said. A perfect candidate for b&w.
And very well executed, Karen! Beautiful in b&w.
Just curious: did you start from the colour version you linked to or from the original?
My B&W's generally start from my color versions. Sometimes I increase saturation a bit before processing in SEP......although I didn't do that in this case. As we were headed back to camp, I asked the driver to stop for a minute so I could photograph these particular trees. I just really liked the composition....
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
16,741
I do so as well.
I do the basic corrections (in DxO) and take a dng output to either DxO FilmPack or SEP for b&w conversion.

My B&W's generally start from my color versions. Sometimes I increase saturation a bit before processing in SEP......although I didn't do that in this case. As we were headed back to camp, I asked the driver to stop for a minute so I could photograph these particular trees. I just really liked the composition....
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
15,379
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
For those following along, when it comes to adjusting the various grayscale tonalities, it really doesn't matter whether all of that post-processing of a monochrome version takes place using only the monochrome-producing software or whether the color version is post-processed first and then handed off to the other software. I use the latter method partly because that's I first learned how to make monochromes and partly because every once in a while I'll realize that an image I envisioned in monochrome actually appeals to me more in color.
 

JLH

Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
74
I like the trees. Back in my Tri-X days when I lived in East Africa I would have shot this with a filter, maybe Red if I wanted a dramatic sky and clouds, Orange or Yellow to make it more mellow. Oh, now we do all of this in post! I am getting old!
Nice work as always. The "right" crop and contrast is in the eye of the artist and is personal. I like a dramatic, high contrast, sky with the white clouds popping out and the "blue sky" nearly black when working in BW, but that is just me.
 

Butlerkid

Cafe Ambassador
Moderator
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
21,374
Location
Rutledge, Tennessee
Real Name
Karen
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
@
I would like to see this B&W with more dramatic, more contrasty, editing. I feel like there’s a beautiful dramatic sky hiding behind this edit.
I like the trees. Back in my Tri-X days when I lived in East Africa I would have shot this with a filter, maybe Red if I wanted a dramatic sky and clouds, Orange or Yellow to make it more mellow. Oh, now we do all of this in post! I am getting old!
Nice work as always. The "right" crop and contrast is in the eye of the artist and is personal. I like a dramatic, high contrast, sky with the white clouds popping out and the "blue sky" nearly black when working in BW, but that is just me.
Thanks so much for your comments! In taking this shot, it was really all about the wide expanse of the Serengeti (12,000 square miles!) and the graphic acacia trees. It was a typical sunny day with billowing white clouds - not storm clouds. My original crop in Post #1 doesn't really convey that. Here is the final crop I chose:
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Of course, I could have processed the image in Post #1 to have a much darker, stormy look to it. That would probably have resulted in a nice image also. But that type of processing would not result in the kind of image I wanted to create.
 

JLH

Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
74
My grand daughter studied art in school (went on to be a teacher however). One day we were discussing photography compared to painting. I was explaining to her how a painting is not an exact representation of the subject but rather was an insight into what the artist was seeing and feeling inside their head as they viewed the subject. A photo is much the same, we can manipulate it to convey the thoughts, mood and feelings we were having as we viewed the subject. So while there are times we want a photo to be an exact image of the subject there are other times we want to convey a mood or feeling. This photo is of a sky, grass and some trees, something we see most every day. BUT, this is a very special place and as you drove by it caught your attention. As you process it you want to convey the feeling of that moment in that place. Its not just any old tree after all or just another sky.
So, the artist, be it with paint or electrons from a sensor, whatever, uses their mind's eye to try to capture that unique moment in time and save it and share it. You have done a wonderful job of sharing what you saw in that moment. I suppose whenever we are doing a photo we ask ourselves; who is this image for? What is the message or feeling I want to communicate? While others may comment on what they think of the photo from a technical stand point the important thing is how it communicates the feeling of the photographer at that unique instant in time as they stood there.
Karen, your picture is, as always, wonderful.
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom