Setting up a network 1500 feet away?

Discussion in 'Apple/Mac' started by Tim Ernst, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. I'm trying to figure out if it is possible to set up a networked computer in a building of mine that is 1500 feet away from my main computers (it is through the woods - no direct line of sight). I have a phone cable connecting the two buildings, including a DSL line (that building is on a different power line though). I want to be able to access a computer in the remote building and download some pretty large files to it. It is possible to somehow connect this remote computer through the phone/DSL line? Or do they make an ethernet cable that long that does not cost thousands of dollars? I'm assuming there is no way to do wireless that far through the forest - or is there? If anyone has an idea I would be most appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Lowolf

    Lowolf

    Jan 26, 2006
    Oregon
    look into Phoneline networking or though the ele wiring
    you could also look into wireless even satelite
     
  3. Yup, I am trying to look into those things right here and hope someone has a suggestion. As noted the buildings are not connected by the same electrical wiring so that is not an option...
     
  4. Tim, I'm not an expert here, but can't you just connect your DSL modem to a wireless router located in the remote location? Alternatively I guess you could use a wired router if you can run wires to devices in the remote location you want to connect.

    Power has nothing to do with this. All you need is the network connection.

    Do you have two separate DSL lines or are these locations on the same DSL line? This point wasn't clear to me from your initial post.

    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  5. Lowolf

    Lowolf

    Jan 26, 2006
    Oregon
    you can buy network cable to run to the other location or go ext wireless antenna with a wireless card installed on other pc
    I have two wireless routers which are hardwired into each other and split to two zones works quite well for me
    this way can segment the network doing it this way and protect my servers as well
     
  6. Thanks for the info. The DSL line is the same line - I have a 1500' phone cable buried between the two locations (with six pairs of phone lines - it is the standard phone company buried cable they sold me so I could connect my warehouse to my cabin). My wireless network will hardly go 50' inside my cabin much less all the way up to the other location through the woods so I was trying to figure out if I could hook it up via the phone cable somehow. I have found some wireless antennas that claim to be good for a mile but I have a feeling that would not work quite as advertised, especially through heavy woods, but if someone has used anything to boost your wireless I would love to hear what you used. OR I could run 1500' of ethernet cable if that was possible to get a chunk that long and it did not cost hundreds of dollars. Thanks!
     
  7. Tim, all you need to do is connect a router at the remote DSL location. Just plug it into the RS45 jack and connect your remote devices to the router.

    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  8. Virginia:

    That sounds too easy, but would be perfect! Just to be clear, the remote location has the phone line running to it that has the DSL signal on it. I don't have a modem at the remote location, but do have a modem and router at my main location. Wouldn't I need a modem at the remote location first, or are you saying that all I would need to do is plug in a router to the phone plug at the remote location? I'm not too bright on all this DSL or network stuff, but so far with all my Mac equipment it has worked great even with me being a dummy!
     
  9. Tim, I've only done this with a PC, so I don't know if there are any other (Mac) issues. You don't need a DSL modem at the remote location, just an RJ45 DSL jack. It's pretty simple and should do what you want. Just plug your router into the jack.

    A simple 4-6 port router (enough for 4-6 devices) should do and they're pretty cheap. Basically what you are doing is piggy backing on the existing network.

    Give it a try. I do it now to extend my hard-wired network connections so I don't have to add more RJ45 jacks.

    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  10. OK, that sounds easy enough - I've got a spare router sitting around here somewhere so I'll give that a try, although I guess I need to find out what a RJ45 DSL jack is first.... Thanks!
     
  11. Great, Tim! The RJ45 jack is bigger than a normal phone line jack connection. If it helps take a look at how things are connected in your main DSL connection. You should see what an RJ45 jack looks like there.

    I hope you have some spare cables too. They'll need to have those "big" RJ45 jack connections too. All connections you make to your LAN need these bigger jacks.

    Let us know how you do.

    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  12. Virginia:

    My DSL modem is connected via a normal phone cord and jack. Everything else that comes out of it is for Ethernet cable (I assume this is the same as RJ45?). So I guess all I do is buy an RJ45 jack at Radio Shack and connect the phone wires to it at the remote location - it just takes two phone wires? I still can't believe it would be that simple - nothing is that simple where I live. I will figure all of this out when I head into town to see what they have (a three-hour round trip for me). Thanks for the info!
     
  13. Cougar8045

    Cougar8045

    184
    May 25, 2007
    Earth
    Sorry guys. None of your option would work. Ethernet cable is limited to about 100 meters. If you go any further than 100 meters(about 300 ft), you will lose your signal. You need a signal repeater or bridge in order to make this work. However, since it will be outdoor in the woods and no electricity, that's not an option either.

    This leaves only one option. A very very strong wireless router. There is one I know of that the signal can reach as far as 1 mile. I can't remember the manufacture name but I will look it up. Here is a bigger question. Do you really want your network signal to reach that far because people can hack into it. The only people I know who use such powerful wireless router are farmer. They use it to control & manage irrigation equipment on large farmland.
     
  14. Cougar8045

    Cougar8045

    184
    May 25, 2007
    Earth
    Here is the product I was talking about. It's called SignalMax. You will need both router and wireless lan card from the same manufacture in order to achieve the 1 mile range in open field. If you are only need to reach 1,500 ft, this set up might do it for you. Here is a review of the product. http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/reviews/AP/article.php/3445641

    There is another wireless router made by Bountiful that has very powerful signal but maximum reach is only about 1,200 ft. This is a much more expensive router, about $500.
     
  15. Cougar8045

    Cougar8045

    184
    May 25, 2007
    Earth
    This won't work either. Your piggy back wiring is too far.
     
  16. Thanks for the info. You made me realize something I had forgotten, ie. that DSL is distance sensitive. This whole problem becomes much more complex when you take this into consideration. I've been working in much more constrained spaces. 1500 ft is quite a haul.

    I'm so glad you pipped in here and I hope I haven't misled anyone.
    :redface:
    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  17. Cougar8045

    Cougar8045

    184
    May 25, 2007
    Earth
    All network protocol has some kind of limitation, not just DSL. It's very easy to forget those limitation exist because most of the home user never exceed those limitation.

    If those powerful wireless router set up won't work, the only option left is fiber optic. That is going to cost $$$. Layout the fiber optic is another big challenge because it's very fragile. That require professional installation and not a DIY job.

    Create a network to reach 1,500 ft is no easy task. It take some serious hardware to make this happen. General hardware you can buy in store like Best Buy or Circuit City won't cut the mustard.
     
  18. Yup, as I said a couple of times it all sounded just too easy to be true. My closest neighbor is more than three miles away so I'm not concerned about anyone else grabbing my signal so a wireless setup would work just fine (and the squirrels and bears could get onto the internet). I had noted in an early post here about that one-mail distance for the antenna I had found online and doubted it would work as advertised but it sounds like that may be my only hope. Thanks for all of your help!
     
  19. Cougar8045

    Cougar8045

    184
    May 25, 2007
    Earth
    It not just the antenna. You need the specific wireless router and LAN card to go with it together.
     
  20. Here is one of the other products I found - http://www.macwireless.com/html/products/antennas_boosters/airport_boosters.php
    and http://www.macwireless.com/html/products/antennas_boosters/airport_boosters.php

    Somewhere I found one that claimed a mile coverage, but going through trees I have a feeling that 1500 feet would be a stretch for any of them...

    I also found a repeater that took its power from the ethernet cable and you could run it 300' or more into the woods. I'm sure most of this stuff does not work as advertised but I guess there are many options to have a look at...
     
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