Setting up a new router - static IP?

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I have a new router on the way - it takes a while though during lockdown :)
At the moment I think my old router is playing up, my Macbook connects ok but the Windows PC says that "Wifi doesn't have
a valis IP configuration" - it worked fine yesterday. On the first troubleshooting attempt it said it wasn't fixe, on the second attempt
it said it is fixed - not sure what the difference was. Then again it still can't connect to the internet even though it says it is fixed :mad:
Anyway: I've ordered a slightly better router that advertises "4 aerials for greater range" and it's supposedly a "smart modem"
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I've never tinkered much with them and their settings in the past but since I have added several smart devices, 220 plugs, light bulbs, door sensors, Alexa Echo, Eufycam 2c, etc.
I'm wondering if I should start paying more attention to preventing conflicts. Should I set a static IP address for each device when I set them up again after installing the new router?
Also after tips on numbering the IP addresses.
 
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Don Roy
You could go both ways. My router is the 192.168.1.1 device and issues DHCP IPs from .1.2 through .1.150. Everything from .1.151 up can be used as static as needed. All the PCs and phones in the house use DHCP, our printers, TV streaming devices, and my NAS, use static.
 
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You could go both ways. My router is the 192.168.1.1 device and issues DHCP IPs from .1.2 through .1.150. Everything from .1.151 up can be used as static as needed. All the PCs and phones in the house use DHCP, our printers, TV streaming devices, and my NAS, use static.
Thanks, when I looked into using my NAS for security camera storage it showed me a procedure of setting things to static IP - which had me wondering if I should just do it with everything I have.
 
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IF you do static IP, you NEED to keep good records, so you don't accidentally issue the same IP to two different devices, which over time can be easy to accidentally do, as you retire, replace and add devices. So I would think REAL HARD about why a device should be assigned a static IP, vs. DHCP assigned IP address.
Don's idea is good, have your static IP be below or above a certain address.

For DHCP, you need a BIG enough range for ALL your DHCP devices. If you only have 1.2 to 1.10 in the pool and you add a 10th device, there is no IP address available for it. Today with more and more stuff on WiFi or attached to the network, it can be easy to exceed what used to be a large enough DHCP IP pool.

Your problem sounds somewhat like mine.
I have two WiFi routers, that gives me the same problem. Sometimes my tablet will connect to the WiFi router, but cannot establish an internet connection. So I have to cold boot the router, which is a PitA to have to do. I never figured out WHY it happens. In my case because I have two WiFi routers, the DHCP server is another device, not the routers, which functions as a simple wireless access point (WAP).
 
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IF you do static IP, you NEED to keep good records, so you don't accidentally issue the same IP to two different devices, which over time can be easy to accidentally do, as you retire, replace and add devices. So I would think REAL HARD about why a device should be assigned a static IP, vs. DHCP assigned IP address.
Don's idea is good, have your static IP be below or above a certain address.

For DHCP, you need a BIG enough range for ALL your DHCP devices. If you only have 1.2 to 1.10 in the pool and you add a 10th device, there is no IP address available for it. Today with more and more stuff on WiFi or attached to the network, it can be easy to exceed what used to be a large enough DHCP IP pool.

Your problem sounds somewhat like mine.
I have two WiFi routers, that gives me the same problem. Sometimes my tablet will connect to the WiFi router, but cannot establish an internet connection. So I have to cold boot the router, which is a PitA to have to do. I never figured out WHY it happens. In my case because I have two WiFi routers, the DHCP server is another device, not the routers, which functions as a simple wireless access point (WAP).
Thanks, it definitely sounds like one of those "no simple answer" problems :)
 

Growltiger

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I use static addresses for all devices that stay plugged in always. So that is things like CCTV cameras, routers, wifi access points, print servers, TVs, satellite receivers, network printers.
I use dynamic addresses (DHCP) for everything else, that is all computers, phones, visitors.
I have a accurate list of all static devices and their IP addresses.
You must understand the address of your router and what DHCP range it provides. For static addresses you need them in the same last number range, but not in the DHCP range (unless you get more complicated).
Example.
Router is at 192.168.1.254.
It uses DHCP from 192.168.1.64 to 192.168.1.200
So for example you could use 192.168.1.11 up to 192.168.1.63 for static addresses. (I left the bottom ones free for adding more routers, to keep things tidy).

PS. I should have mentioned that to make a device have a static IP address you must configure the device itself and tell it to have the static IP address. (Sometimes people think they tell the router.)
 
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My router is in a metal cabinet so the WiFi is turned off. My house is wired with multiple data points in every room.

For WiFi I use a couple of long range Ubiquiti access points. Setup is easy and they hand off as you walk around the house. I also reserve the first 40 IP addresses for things like printers, and in particular my Sonos audio system. Everything else is set for dynamic.

https://www.ui.com/products/#unifi
 

Growltiger

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You should review the strength of your wifi system throughout the house. You can do this easily with a phone. If you have an android phone download the free app Wifi Analyzer.
My house is very old and has thick stone walls that radio waves don't go through. So I cabled it and have four wifi access points.

PS. Yes, I have some very long drill bits...
 
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One more thing... You do NOT need to tell the devices to use manual/static. Every device can be simple DHCP at the device end, since DHCP just means, "Hello out there, can I have an IP please?" In the router, you can assign any known MAC address to a specific IP. My 'assign static to new device' procedure is to let the new device DHCP itself as usual, then look at the router's 'connected devices' list and assign that new device's MAC to have my chosen IP. This way it is no problem if something goes sideways, since all the devices can just DHCP themselves in.
 

Growltiger

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One more thing... You do NOT need to tell the devices to use manual/static. Every device can be simple DHCP at the device end, since DHCP just means, "Hello out there, can I have an IP please?" In the router, you can assign any known MAC address to a specific IP. My 'assign static to new device' procedure is to let the new device DHCP itself as usual, then look at the router's 'connected devices' list and assign that new device's MAC to have my chosen IP. This way it is no problem if something goes sideways, since all the devices can just DHCP themselves in.
While what you say is true, I recommend that for greater reliability you do as I recommended and configure each static device to simply adopt the static address required. That way they will all continue to work even if the router proving DHCP is no longer working correctly for any reason, or if communications to it are lost. They can continue to work despite problems with the network itself, such as connection problems causing the network to become fragmented.

A simple example would be my satellite box which also communicates via the network with a mini box in another room. This allows viewing from the same satellite dish in multiple rooms. None of this requires an internet service or a router. By configuring both boxes with static addresses they will continue to work regardless of problems elsewhere.

Relying on the DHCP router for everything means there is a single point of failure for everything.
 
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Relying on the DHCP router for everything means there is a single point of failure for everything.
hmmm
Thinking out loud here, since I am NOT a network guy.
Can you put two DHCP servers on the network, each with a separate pool.
example, server 1, from 1.51-1.100 and server 2 from 1.101-1.150.
That way if one of the DHCP servers goes down, the other is available.
What I have no idea is how it will work when I plug a computer into the network and it asks for an IP, and there are two DHCP servers running. How do they keep from colliding? Although worst case, each DHCP server could issue an IP, but having two separate pools, the issued IP addresses won't duplicate.
 

Growltiger

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hmmm
Thinking out loud here, since I am NOT a network guy.
Can you put two DHCP servers on the network, each with a separate pool.
example, server 1, from 1.51-1.100 and server 2 from 1.101-1.150.
That way if one of the DHCP servers goes down, the other is available.
What I have no idea is how it will work when I plug a computer into the network and it asks for an IP, and there are two DHCP servers running. How do they keep from colliding? Although worst case, each DHCP server could issue an IP, but having two separate pools, the issued IP addresses won't duplicate.
You are right, you can have multiple DHCP servers, but they need to have different scopes or you can get IP conflicts. Or you can use some kind of hardware failover. But don't even think of having more than one DHCP server on your network unless you are already a network specialist.
(To answer your question, the first one to reply wins.)

Your next question is going to be if you can have multiple gateways - yes you can.
 
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You are right, you can have multiple DHCP servers, but they need to have different scopes or you can get IP conflicts. Or you can use some kind of hardware failover. But don't even think of having more than one DHCP server on your network unless you are already a network specialist.
(To answer your question, the first one to reply wins.)

Your next question is going to be if you can have multiple gateways - yes you can.
Nope, I'm not a network specialist, so I will stick with KISS, and just use one DHCP server.
My days of playing with networks and domain servers are LONG past, and much of that has been forgotten. I'm at the stage that I remember enough to be dangerous, and not enough to be safe. And network admin is not the fun it used to be when I was younger.
 

Growltiger

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My little network here has a gigabit fiber modem/router/wifi, three dumb gigabit switches, one managed gigabit switch, three additional cabled wifi access points, plus one powerline pair to a location that missed out on cabling and needed yet another wifi access point. There is even an underground network cable providing a gigabit connection to another building, but I've never yet needed it.

There are currently 19 devices with static IP addresses, plus various computers and phones with dynamic addresses.

Not a single network issue since initial installation 18 years ago.

One annoying complication is that I need dynamic DNS so I can access the site remotely, as I don't want to pay for a static IP address. The fiber router doesn't support dynamic DNS so I set up a Raspberry Pi dedicated to doing that job. It checks the external IP every few minutes and if it has changed it updates the DNS record at noip.com.
 
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At the risk of confusing the issue even more, at least with some higher end ASUS Wireless Routers, my preference is assigning a static IP outside the DHCP range for my Security NVR and other fixed devices in my home.

This provides a true static assignment that is not managed by the Router DHCP server. Assigning a "static" IP within the DHCP range is an ASUS feature but actually not a true static address, just a DHCP reservation and is an IP you reserve within your DHCP scope, so the DHCP server will always allocate the same IP.

Some people confuse "static IPs" with "lease reservations". Static IPs, which are manually configured on the network interface, should be outside of a DHCP scope, as they aren't managed by the DHCP server. Lease reservations, which are allocated dynamically by the DHCP server, should be within its scope." A lease reservation can function much the same way as a static IP but issues can still come up after power failures and other unforeseen circumstances.

My DHCP pool is from 192.168.1.26 to 192.168.1.254 I may need to shrink it down a bit eventually, leaving 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.25 for static IP assignment.

I’m sure you are glad I cleared that up 😊.
 
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My little network here has a gigabit fiber modem/router/wifi, three dumb gigabit switches, one managed gigabit switch, three additional cabled wifi access points, plus one powerline pair to a location that missed out on cabling and needed yet another wifi access point. There is even an underground network cable providing a gigabit connection to another building, but I've never yet needed it.

There are currently 19 devices with static IP addresses, plus various computers and phones with dynamic addresses.

Not a single network issue since initial installation 18 years ago.

One annoying complication is that I need dynamic DNS so I can access the site remotely, as I don't want to pay for a static IP address. The fiber router doesn't support dynamic DNS so I set up a Raspberry Pi dedicated to doing that job. It checks the external IP every few minutes and if it has changed it updates the DNS record at noip.com.
He he
I set up my network at home just to my office. This was long before WiFi and networking became as central in life as it has become. So, the house is not wired for a LAN, and the location of the server and cable modem is a BAD place for a WiFi router. So I have to have two WiFi routers to deal with the construction of the house.

I upgraded twice, from 10bT to 100bT to Gigabit.
No fiber here, at least not yet. Only cable internet.

Today, I would make a central server/comm closet as a hub for all wiring into the house (phone and internet) and pull LAN cable to each room. That is such a PitA to do in an older home.
 
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At the risk of confusing the issue even more, at least with some higher end ASUS Wireless Routers, my preference is assigning a static IP outside the DHCP range for my Security NVR and other fixed devices in my home.

This provides a true static assignment that is not managed by the Router DHCP server. Assigning a "static" IP within the DHCP range is an ASUS feature but actually not a true static address, just a DHCP reservation and is an IP you reserve within your DHCP scope, so the DHCP server will always allocate the same IP.

Some people confuse "static IPs" with "lease reservations". Static IPs, which are manually configured on the network interface, should be outside of a DHCP scope, as they aren't managed by the DHCP server. Lease reservations, which are allocated dynamically by the DHCP server, should be within its scope." A lease reservation can function much the same way as a static IP but issues can still come up after power failures and other unforeseen circumstances.

My DHCP pool is from 192.168.1.26 to 192.168.1.254 I may need to shrink it down a bit eventually, leaving 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.25 for static IP assignment.

I’m sure you are glad I cleared that up 😊.
I completely forgot about reservations.
I've been away from it for too long.
 

Growltiger

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Today, I would make a central server/comm closet as a hub for all wiring into the house (phone and internet) and pull LAN cable to each room. That is such a PitA to do in an older home.
Mine is 300 years old but I did a big building project on it 18 years ago ripping out all the pipes and electrics so there was an opportunity to run the cables, as you describe.
 

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