Severe image distortion in camera Z 7

Joined
Mar 8, 2021
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I am having intermittent severe distortion problems with my Z 7. I attach two images where the telephone pole in one frame looks like an "S", the other straight. This particular image was acquired with a Z 7 and a Tamron 150-600. The distortion is not seen in the evf at time of acquisition, but is seen in the evf and lcd on in camera image review. Apple properties-1-2.jpg Apple properties-1.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
893
Location
MN, USA
Yes, I believe silent photography was on. Can you explain what the implications of that is? Thank you!
Electronic shutter (or silent shutter) reads the sensor one scan line at a time. I believe on the Z7, the scan time is 1/16th of a second. If you have a rapidly moving object (golf club or a fan for example) the object can change position in the time it takes to scan the entire sensor so it gets distorted. This is a fan with the ES:
20200225-17-27-49.jpg
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And here it is on regular mechanical shutter:

20200225-17-27-32.jpg
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For you, I think that what people are suggesting is that the VC on your Tamron, and the IBS on your Z7 are not playing well together so the sensor shifts over the course of the 1/16th second scan time. Try either turning off the VC on the Tamron, or the IBIS on the Z7 and use mechanical shutter.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
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Winter Haven, florida
Rolling shutter is an issue with most of the mirrorless cameras in silent mode.
Just switch over to the mechanical shutter and this will go away.
I was also burnt by the same issues, so I essentially now never use electronic shutter.
I try not to make the same mistake twice, I am too busy making new ones.
gary
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
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Moscow, Idaho
Rolling shutter is an issue with most of the mirrorless cameras in silent mode.
Just switch over to the mechanical shutter and this will go away.
I was also burnt by the same issues, so I essentially now never use electronic shutter.
I try not to make the same mistake twice, I am too busy making new ones.
gary
Me too. Best part of this hobby. Never a boring day!
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
I believe silent photography was on. Can you explain what the implications of that is?

To begin with an explanation that is probably overly simplistic but is the only one I'm knowledgeable enough to provide:

The shutter has the front and rear curtains. When using Nikon's mechanical shutter, both curtains operate mechanically. When using the electronic front-curtain shutter, only the rear curtain is operated mechanically. When using Silent Photography, both curtains are operated electronically.

Keeping all of that in mind, everything shown below are my own notes I've made for myself to refer to from time to time. They are summaries of the stuff explained by Thom Hogan in his Guide to the Nikon Z6 and Z7. Some of it (but only a small part of it) might pertain to the issue you've experienced.

Silent Photography: It's the last menu item in the Photo Shooting menu. It's also a sub-menu item of Focus shift shooting, which when enabled will override a disabled setting in the Photo Shooting Menu while focus shift shooting is taking place.

It silences nearly everything, not just the shutter, and is the most quiet mode of shooting.

It reduces vibrations that otherwise would be caused by the mechanical shutter when any other shutter mode is being used.

Silent Photography can cause flicker, banding or distortion under fluorescent, mercury vapor or sodium lamps or if the subject moves too fast. It also might produce jagged edges, color fringing, moire, and bright spots. Flashing lights in the scene or the subject lit by a flashing or momentary light might product bright regions or bands.

Flash that is controlled by the camera won't be available when using Silent Photography.

CONCLUSIONS (made for myself): Usually use Silent Photography only when using a tripod outside my makeshift studio, though note the issues explained above as when not to use it even then. Never use it in the makeshift studio even when focus bracketing (because of the fluorescent lights and because flash can't be used when Silent Photography is enabled). In handheld situations, don't use it unless you absolutely must because of a need for quiet.

NOTE: I'm not an expert about this stuff, so I would be thrilled to be corrected about anything in this post that is wrong or is at least slightly misleading.
 
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Joined
Nov 14, 2005
Messages
2,652
Location
Winter Haven, florida
When using the electronic "silent" shutter, on essentially all mirrorless systems including nikon, the entire chip is not read at the same time.
There are some experimental cameras that have essentially a global shutter.
Presently, the camera basically reads the sensor one line or row at a time - let's call it from the top to the bottom.
If an object is on motion, or if the camera is moving, the object will be in a different position each time the camera reads a row. If there is a lot of motion, by the time the camera reads the last row the object is in a different part of the frame- so when everything is compiled it looks smeared or bent.
The next generation of silent shutter we are all looking for is the so called global shutter. Here the entire chip is read at the same instant- and there is no rolling shutter effect.
MNglass noted above the readout speed for nikon was about 1/16th sec. Think how much blur you would have with a 1/16 shutter speed- roughly the same thing.
There are some newer sensors coming out that have faster readout speeds.
Sony's newest sensor has a readout speed of about 1/240 sec- so less rolling shutter issues.
Like everything else in photography there are pluses and minuses to everything.
Silent shutter decreases shutter shock vibration which can be a big plus.
The minuses are rolling shutter effects, and often weird bokeh effects.
gary
 
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