Should I consider a new TV?

Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
23,417
Location
SW Virginia
Our household (just my wife and I) has two TV sets. The main one is a Sony 40-inch XBR bought in January 2009, so it's 11 years old. It still works fine and we enjoy using it but I do have trouble reading the score of sports events from the other side of the room.

Our bedroom TV is a Sony 32-inch XBR which is at least 13 years old. It also still works fine but gets little use.

I know there is a lot of new technology available in TV sets now and I'm impressed with the pictures I see when I walk through Best Buy.

Would I see a noticeable improvement if I upgraded to a new model? If so, which technology?
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
4,653
Location
Redwood City, CA
The Sony and LG 4K OLED sets are currently the best screens on the market. I'm about to get the Sony in a 55 inch to replace a Samsung 46 inch 1080p. One reason to increase size is because so many shows use sidebars that use up screen space.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
23,417
Location
SW Virginia
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
The Sony and LG 4K OLED sets are currently the best screens on the market. I'm about to get the Sony in a 55 inch to replace a Samsung 46 inch 1080p. One reason to increase size is because so many shows use sidebars that use up screen space.
Thanks, Ted. Your post raises a couple of questions:

1) How old is the set you're replacing?

2) Is there any 4k programming available?

I agree with your complaint about screen real estate disappearing; it's one of my pet peeves, especially on sports programming which is about all I watch.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
4,653
Location
Redwood City, CA
The set I'll replace is a 36 inch Sony XBR 1080p that my wife watches in the master bedroom. It's about 15 years old. The 46 Samsung moves to the master bedroom and the new Sony 55 would replace it in the kitchen where I watch TV. DTV does have some 4K available now, but the higher resolution shows up in things like program guides and those pesky sidebars.

BTW, my kitchen is also my hangout room. I also do more food prep...
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,916
Location
London
3 months old Samsung UHD 74xx series, we got two new ones to replace a 10 yo LG TV.
I went for one model that has a smart technology that helps with the blacks and contrast.
They are 4K as in London we have 4K programmes, both on digital terrestrial and on Apple TV 4K, Amazon Prime, Netflix, youtube...
They include all sorts of smart technologies and connectivity solutions.
It makes a huge difference.
 
Joined
Jan 21, 2006
Messages
1,734
Location
Johns Creek, Ga
Replaced a Pioneer Pro-630HD (720p) rear projection tv (neighbors cable struck by lightning and traveled into our home) with 75" Sony XBR-950G 4K UHD. Has been a great improvement. Initially concerned with going to 75" from the Pioneers 58" but as the picture is so much cleaner and clearer, the larger screen size hasn't bother us at all. Some 4k programing offered by provider but most of the 4K content that we watch is from Netflix, Amazon Prime, You Tube or 4kUHD dvd's. The Sony is a LED-LCD and when we purchased considered a OLED tv. For movies the OLED tv had better black and seemed to have more contrast, but also exhibited some motion artifacts on action scenes. In addition 55" was the largest OLED offered at the time and was more expensive than the Sony.

I believe that motion artifact issues have now been addressed and corrected on the OLED sets. They do produce a wonderful picture. In addition OLED sets now offered in sizes up to 77" but they still carry a premium price over a LED-LCD. The Sony produces a wonderful picture and the newer models are even better. However if I we were considering today and wanted best picture quality available, especially for what we primarily watch, (movies) I would go with a OLED set.
 
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
2,365
Location
GA
Going bigger, in general, will yield a much better display for obvious reasons. A lot of people recommend Samsung, but not me. The company is notorious for horrible QA and QC and i've been burned by them multiple times with multiple lines of products...never again, especially when Sony exists for higher end displays and Vizio exists for great consumer grade displays.

I have a 65" M series Vizio in my living room and it's been fantastic, but I do feel like I want even bigger.
 

kilofoxtrott

European Ambassador
Moderator
Joined
Dec 29, 2011
Messages
8,910
Location
Tettnang, Germany
Real Name
Klaus
I bought a 65" Sony Bravia 4k kast year.
All I have to say about it - WOW!
The quality of the display is magnificent.

Regards
Klaus
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
23,417
Location
SW Virginia
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Thanks for all the replies.

We watch a movie maybe once a month; we primarily watch college sports, and occasionally NFL but mostly just during the playoffs. Maybe a couple of times a month we'll watch a cultural/educational program from PBS.

I do stream the Metropolitan Opera on-demand service occasionally.

All these large screen sets you folks are discussing I find shocking. I could maybe consider going from our 40-inch to a 43 or 46 but anything larger would seem too obtrusive/dominating.
 
Thanks for all the replies.

We watch a movie maybe once a month; we primarily watch college sports, and occasionally NFL but mostly just during the playoffs. Maybe a couple of times a month we'll watch a cultural/educational program from PBS.

I do stream the Metropolitan Opera on-demand service occasionally.

All these large screen sets you folks are discussing I find shocking. I could maybe consider going from our 40-inch to a 43 or 46 but anything larger would seem too obtrusive/dominating.
I agree about the large screens! Good grief, do people REALLY have the room for such huge things in their homes? Wouldn't you have to sit way across the room from the thing in order to have comfortable and safe viewing? I live in a small condominium unit (2 bedroom/2 bath) that is 1045 SF total; there is absolutely NO space in this place for a monstrous cinema-sized television set. I have one TV in the bedroom, a 32-inch Samsung that is about 7 or 8 years old now, and I rarely watch it. Actually, I didn't buy this; the TV was given to me by the family of a good friend after she passed away. The rather small one (19"?) I had prior was something like 20 or more years old or so. This one I have now is not a "smart TV" connected to the internet, which is fine with me. I have computers for that. I sometimes watch movies on my computer if I've downloaded one from iTunes, and about the only time I actually turn on the television is if there is some major news event happening or if a favorite singer is going to be performing.
 
Joined
Jan 21, 2006
Messages
1,734
Location
Johns Creek, Ga
Technology has changed, when we 1st upgraded to a rear projection 50” mits at 480p we were right on the edge of what was comfortable viewing from 10ft, the Pioneer Pro 630 a 58” 720p tv was comfortable viewing as close as 8ft due to better picture (cleaner and clearer, greater resolution). Our current 75” normally view at 10ft but have no problem even at 8ft.it is so much clearer , artifacts present in the 480 and 720p pictures are virtually nonexistent @ 1080 and 4K material.

The 50” mits is in the bedroom and at 8ft viewing distance, I have more issues watching it vs the 75” 4K at the same 8ft distance.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
23,417
Location
SW Virginia
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
"mits" ?

Our viewing distance is 9-10 feet if we are sitting in front of the TV, but we also like to be able to see it from the kitchen table which is about 20 feet away.

Technology has changed, when we 1st upgraded to a rear projection 50” mits at 480p we were right on the edge of what was comfortable viewing from 10ft, the Pioneer Pro 630 a 58” 720p tv was comfortable viewing as close as 8ft due to better picture (cleaner and clearer, greater resolution). Our current 75” normally view at 10ft but have no problem even at 8ft.it is so much clearer , artifacts present in the 480 and 720p pictures are virtually nonexistent @ 1080 and 4K material.

The 50” mits is in the bedroom and at 8ft viewing distance, I have more issues watching it vs the 75” 4K at the same 8ft distance.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
6,117
Location
Upstate SC
In short, Pa, YES to all your questions. Your biggest limitation with regards to programming is your provider. Some offer far more high resolution content than others. The good news is nearly any 55” plus 4K tv will upscale a 1080p image to look very nice. Three years ago we replaced a vintage 1998-ish Toshiba rear projection 40” 480p tv with a 55” Hisense flat screen 1080p. My wife was skeptical by both the size and the whole “high def” thing. Until she saw it. We very shortly thereafter ended up with a second identical one. Our viewing distance was far enough that I couldn’t convince her to agree to going 4K.

Last year we moved into a much larger home with a generously sized master suite. Our bed positions us around 20ft from a tv (which I’ll go on record saying that I don’t like a tv in the bedroom). Let’s just say that she picked out a monstrosity 75” 4K Samsung and the two other TVs reside elsewhere in the house. The view and picture are pretty astonishing. I’d say about 10% of what we watch is native 4K, but it doesn’t matter - it all looks good!

We also cut the cable when we moved. We use a mixture of smart tv (the Samsung), Fire TV, and Apple TV (my favorite) to get all our programming. Mostly we watch Hulu and Netflix, but when I’m watching alone, I’m usually on NatGeo or RedBull TV, and virtually all the latter is 4K.
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom