Should I consider a new TV?

Joined
Jan 2, 2012
Messages
6,145
Location
British Columbia
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
2,222
Location
GA
Fiber is always outside and to the house. Once at the house it gets terminated by an ONT then that goes to your router. After that it's up to you how it gets distributed inside the house.

Not all TV service goes through fiber though. Or phone service.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,656
Location
SW Virginia
It's outside my field of expertise Jim. I wasn't home when they installed it, but a thin optic line goes to your main TV, and your other TV's and computer have access through Wi-Fi. Since you live in a rural area, you may not have access to it yet, best call your provider.
https://www.highspeedinternet.com/resources/what-you-need-to-install-fiber-optic-internet
Fiber is always outside and to the house. Once at the house it gets terminated by an ONT then that goes to your router. After that it's up to you how it gets distributed inside the house.

Not all TV service goes through fiber though. Or phone service.
We have fiber optic cable in the street, but copper from there to the house, about 100 meters. Nevertheless, I get over 300 Mb/s download speed.
 
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
2,222
Location
GA
Yes, I realized my previous post was not completely correct. Fiber is what usually runs between nodes. Nodes then distribute it to the homes and some can do full fiber to the home (FTTH) whereas others terminate at the node then run coax (i've never heard of copper to the home except for non-digital phone service).
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,314
Location
London
Yes, I realized my previous post was not completely correct. Fiber is what usually runs between nodes. Nodes then distribute it to the homes and some can do full fiber to the home (FTTH) whereas others terminate at the node then run coax (i've never heard of copper to the home except for non-digital phone service).
In the UK BT’s Infinity is FTTC with copper from the cabinet to the wall plugs in the majority of homes.
BT advertises speeds of 80/20 but only commits to 60 down and no upload speed.
This summer my upload speed was less than 512kbps.
I had to get a full fibre 150/150 (upgradable to 1000/1000) from hyperoptic but was not able to cancel BT.
They were less than helpful (sarcastic euphemism).
 
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
Messages
2,206
Location
Broussard, LA, USA
The best time to buy a TV is right before the Super Bowl. In other words, any day now. Sharp, Samsung and Sony get my vote. Measure how far you are away from your screen when viewing and how much room you have to place your TV. Go ahead and get a big one!

If you run an outdoor TV antenna and watch uncompressed signal from over the air, you will be amazed!

4K is hard to avoid, so don't fight it.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,656
Location
SW Virginia
Actually, it is coax that I have. I misstated.
But the coax has a copper conductor in the center. That is why I said copper. But we're picking nits here.

If you run an outdoor TV antenna and watch uncompressed signal from over the air, you will be amazed!
Can't do that here because of mountains in the way. But I have done that at our family home in Alabama and I agree.
 

Growltiger

Administrator
Administrator
Joined
Apr 26, 2008
Messages
12,389
Location
Up in the hills, Gloucestershire, UK
In the UK BT’s Infinity is FTTC with copper from the cabinet to the wall plugs in the majority of homes.
BT advertises speeds of 80/20 but only commits to 60 down and no upload speed.
This summer my upload speed was less than 512kbps.
I had to get a full fibre 150/150 (upgradable to 1000/1000) from hyperoptic but was not able to cancel BT.
They were less than helpful (sarcastic euphemism).
Why can't you cancel BT? I cancelled BT after getting FTTH.

At another location I have BT FTTC and it gives me about 18 down (distance from the FTTC cabinet determines it). That is as much as they commit to, not 60.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,314
Location
London
Why can't you cancel BT? I cancelled BT after getting FTTH.

At another location I have BT FTTC and it gives me about 18 down (distance from the FTTC cabinet determines it). That is as much as they commit to, not 60.
Unfortunately the term of my contract does not end until this summer.
My contract has a 40 (not 60 as I thought) guarantee.
But is too expensive and upload speed is a problem.
I’ll see if I can cancel ahead of time.
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,656
Location
SW Virginia
I looked at a few sets at Best Buy yesterday. There was a Sony and a Samsung side-by-side that looked pretty much the same but the Sony cost nearly twice as much. I asked the salesman why someone would pay that much more and he pointed to three things: (1) better color; (2) double the refresh rate (240Hz vs 120Hz); (3) better quality (reliability and longevity).

Only #2 is measurable, but is it noticeable?

I could see that the color was a bit better after he pointed it out.

The last three TV sets I have bought have all been Sony and they have had bullet-proof reliability. The last two are stilling working fine after 11 and 13 years.

So I am inclined to buy Sony.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,314
Location
London
I looked at a few sets at Best Buy yesterday. There was a Sony and a Samsung side-by-side that looked pretty much the same but the Sony cost nearly twice as much. I asked the salesman why someone would pay that much more and he pointed to three things: (1) better color; (2) double the refresh rate (240Hz vs 120Hz); (3) better quality (reliability and longevity).

Only #2 is measurable, but is it noticeable?

I could see that the color was a bit better after he pointed it out.

The last three TV sets I have bought have all been Sony and they have had bullet-proof reliability. The last two are stilling working fine after 11 and 13 years.

So I am inclined to buy Sony.
I stopped buying Sony as the software was awful.
Definitely not as well designed as Samsung's.
But if this is not an issue for you, it makes sense to stick to what you know best and works for you.
 
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
6,677
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado
I looked at a few sets at Best Buy yesterday. There was a Sony and a Samsung side-by-side that looked pretty much the same but the Sony cost nearly twice as much. I asked the salesman why someone would pay that much more and he pointed to three things: (1) better color; (2) double the refresh rate (240Hz vs 120Hz); (3) better quality (reliability and longevity).

Only #2 is measurable, but is it noticeable?

I could see that the color was a bit better after he pointed it out.

The last three TV sets I have bought have all been Sony and they have had bullet-proof reliability. The last two are stilling working fine after 11 and 13 years.

So I am inclined to buy Sony.
The color can be made better with a few simple tweaks. Most THX blurays have (or at least used to have) a simple calibration suite on them. (Edit: biggest thing it to dial down that OOTB brightness).
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
463
Location
Puget Sound
Real Name
Ken
I looked at a few sets at Best Buy yesterday. There was a Sony and a Samsung side-by-side that looked pretty much the same but the Sony cost nearly twice as much. I asked the salesman why someone would pay that much more and he pointed to three things: (1) better color; (2) double the refresh rate (240Hz vs 120Hz); (3) better quality (reliability and longevity).

Only #2 is measurable, but is it noticeable?
I would have to say, most likely yes, you should be able to tell the difference, especially if you watch any content with fast movement. As mirrorless EVF's have upped their refresh rates, it has generally been noticeable for users and things tend to look smoother. But the question in your case is whether the upgrade from 120 to 240 is as noticeable as 60 to 120? Here are some videos that might help you decide, courtesy of "YouTube University" - https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=120hz+vs+240hz+refresh+rate+tv .

Good luck,

--Ken
 
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Messages
2,222
Location
GA
Couple things to consider:
1. sample tv's on display aren't a true representation of the quality
2. Sony's XBR line is top notch but i'd buy a low end Sony over anything Samsung puts out.
3. Go to Rtings.com and look up the TV's you're considering before buying as their reviews are pretty in depth.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,656
Location
SW Virginia
Couple things to consider:
1. sample tv's on display aren't a true representation of the quality
2. Sony's XBR line is top notch but i'd buy a low end Sony over anything Samsung puts out.
3. Go to Rtings.com and look up the TV's you're considering before buying as their reviews are pretty in depth.
Thanks. Both of my current TV sets are Sony XBRs and, as I said above, they've been going strong for well over 10 years.
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom