SL install disk = no wipe?

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I just bought another used MBP... I'm trying to do a fresh install using my SL family pack disk... however, I went through the install and all the old apps, passwords, etc. were still on the computer... did I miss something more that I have to do?
 
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If I recall from my OS install days... only a "clean" install will reformat the drive/erase everything and start fresh. If you do an update then all programs will still be there. Hope that helps.
 
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Does the clean install option pop up after the choice to install SL on the HD? If so, then I missed it b/c I clicked on Install, the process started, told me 45 min. till finish, and I walked away...
 
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Sorry, I've got nothing. :redface: It's been many a moon since I've had to install a Mac OS. Retirement from teaching is a good thing.
 
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:biggrin: My school has only PC's... they are a hassle to maintain. And I have about 30 years to go before I retire from teaching. Good for you! :smile:
 
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When I create new boot disks or reload the OS, I boot from the CD using the optional "C" command at power up. At some point, early in the installation process, you will have the option of selecting the disk to reload and opening Disk Utilities from the top menu bar. From there you can wipe it clean and set the partitions before continuing with the OS load.

I created emergency backup drives, using 16GB USB sticks, for each of my Macs in case of a catastrophic failure. Each USB stick took several hours to create, but I partitioned the drive and named it after booting from the CD.
 
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Thanks, Mike... I looked for where I could open Disk Utilities but didn't see it. I will look again. Once I am in Disk Utilities, which option do I choose? I am not going to do any partitioning... I am happy with the drive being whole, I don't use any Windows products on these computers. I am going to have to do this to 2 computers, the one I bought and the one I will be selling.
 
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Put the OS install disk in the drive and turn off the computer. Then, while holding down the C key, turn the computer on. I don't know when it's acceptable to release the key, but when I do so once I get the white screen with the Apple logo and spinning wheel.

The OS will load from the DVD and the first screen you should see is the box to select the language. Make your selection and then click on the blue arrow in the lower right corner of the box. The next window that appears will be the installation startup window and eventually the "Install Mac OS X" window (if you are using OS X).

At the top of the screen you should see the menu bar with "Mac OS X Installer", plus Files, Edit, Utilities, and Window. Select Utilities and then Disk Utilities. This is the same utility you will see in the normal setup.

You should see a list of drives on the left and some tabs near the middle of the window that say First Aid, Erase, Partition, RAID, and Restore. Click on the Erase tab and then click on the "Security Options..." button. From here you can select the "Zero Out Data" radio button and click on OK. If you have time and are paranoid about the data, you can select the "7-Pass Erase" or "35-Pass Erase" options. If you do this, go to a movie or vacation while it is working.

Click on OK to return to the Erase screen. When you are satisfied with your selection, click on "Erase..." and let Disk Utilities do its job. When it is finished you can quit Disk Utilities and continue with the OS installation, or set a partition on the disk.

I always create one partition that is the size of the entire disk and set the format to "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". Click on the Partition button to set this and name the volume at the same time. When finished quit Disk Utilities and continue with the OS installation.
 
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disk utilities, format disk, from the menu with install disk booted up.

been that way since first osx disk.

I will keep that in mind. I only started using Macs a few years ago, and this is my first time doing a clean install. My upgrades from 10.5 to 10.6 were more of an overwrite (?)...

Put the OS install disk in the drive and turn off the computer. Then, while holding down the C key, turn the computer on. I don't know when it's acceptable to release the key, but when I do so once I get the white screen with the Apple logo and spinning wheel.

The OS will load from the DVD and the first screen you should see is the box to select the language. Make your selection and then click on the blue arrow in the lower right corner of the box. The next window that appears will be the installation startup window and eventually the "Install Mac OS X" window (if you are using OS X).

At the top of the screen you should see the menu bar with "Mac OS X Installer", plus Files, Edit, Utilities, and Window. Select Utilities and then Disk Utilities. This is the same utility you will see in the normal setup.

You should see a list of drives on the left and some tabs near the middle of the window that say First Aid, Erase, Partition, RAID, and Restore. Click on the Erase tab and then click on the "Security Options..." button. From here you can select the "Zero Out Data" radio button and click on OK. If you have time and are paranoid about the data, you can select the "7-Pass Erase" or "35-Pass Erase" options. If you do this, go to a movie or vacation while it is working.

Click on OK to return to the Erase screen. When you are satisfied with your selection, click on "Erase..." and let Disk Utilities do its job. When it is finished you can quit Disk Utilities and continue with the OS installation, or set a partition on the disk.

I always create one partition that is the size of the entire disk and set the format to "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". Click on the Partition button to set this and name the volume at the same time. When finished quit Disk Utilities and continue with the OS installation.

Thanks, Mike, I followed your directions and it is erasing right now. I am still confused about creating the partition... if you are only creating one, is it really a partition? I thought that was when you "split" the HD in 2 or 3 "chunks" so that you could have one for one thing and one for another... is it necessary for me to have to do that step if all I want is one "partition" the size of the entire drive?
 
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Thanks, Mike, I followed your directions and it is erasing right now. I am still confused about creating the partition... if you are only creating one, is it really a partition? I thought that was when you "split" the HD in 2 or 3 "chunks" so that you could have one for one thing and one for another... is it necessary for me to have to do that step if all I want is one "partition" the size of the entire drive?
I don't have an answer to the partition question. I was taught by one, who has forgotten more than I will ever know about Macs, to always create at least one partition, which is Partition 0, when formatting a boot drive. I don't know if this is a holdover from the ancient coal-fired computer days, but it works. I don't know if the OS X Disk Utility creates the partition by default if none are selected, but there is a choice of one partition in the pull-down list.

One other consideration, which I highly recommend, is to create a User account for daily activities and leave the Admin account for system maintenance. By default, a single user has admin privileges on the computer, and so would anyone who was able to hack into the system or use it with your permission. When I set up my MacMini Server, I created Admin and User accounts, with different passwords, and log in as the User.

Any changes that require admin privileges are easy, as the authorization window pops up to enter the admin name and password. I thought this might be a minor inconvenience, but I'm used to it now and the peace of mind is worth it.

I wish I had done this when I set up the iMac and MBP. It was a pain to go back and move everything from the default Admin account to the newly created User account, but it too is worth it.
 
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I don't have an answer to the partition question. I was taught by one, who has forgotten more than I will ever know about Macs, to always create at least one partition, which is Partition 0, when formatting a boot drive. I don't know if this is a holdover from the ancient coal-fired computer days, but it works. I don't know if the OS X Disk Utility creates the partition by default if none are selected, but there is a choice of one partition in the pull-down list.

One other consideration, which I highly recommend, is to create a User account for daily activities and leave the Admin account for system maintenance. By default, a single user has admin privileges on the computer, and so would anyone who was able to hack into the system or use it with your permission. When I set up my MacMini Server, I created Admin and User accounts, with different passwords, and log in as the User.

Any changes that require admin privileges are easy, as the authorization window pops up to enter the admin name and password. I thought this might be a minor inconvenience, but I'm used to it now and the peace of mind is worth it.

I wish I had done this when I set up the iMac and MBP. It was a pain to go back and move everything from the default Admin account to the newly created User account, but it too is worth it.

Yeah, I think I will do that with this computer since it is a laptop and will be taken many different place with me. My iMac at home is not that way, although to use my account (admin) requires the password, because I am literally the only one that uses it. I don't wish to go through the hassle of changing it on that computer...
 

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