So today i got my d50

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR' started by TheHundreds, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. TheHundreds

    TheHundreds

    379
    Jun 26, 2008
    NYC
    Wow i guess i am a super noob.

    For some reason these were dark and grainy.


    testing: all of these are on f5.6
    also they were on softer and fine.
    1. 25 shutter speed iso: 400
    2. 25 shutter speed iso: 800
    3. 25 shutter speed iso: 1600

    DSC_0045.png
    DSC_0046.png
    DSC_0047.png

    1. 25 shutter speed iso: 800
    2. 25 shutter speed iso: 400
    3. 25 shutter speed iso: 200

    DSC_0048.png
    DSC_0049.png
    DSC_0050.png

    i think i need major help.
     
  2. dutchtrumpet

    dutchtrumpet

    493
    May 2, 2007
    Dallas
    those are all way underexposed. Did the camera indicate a correct exposure when taking the shots?
     
  3. Find yourself a copy of the book "Understanding exposure." It's fantastic: clearly written, lots of photos to illustrate the points made and works through things in a logical progression.

    Your photos are underexposed. Changing the ISO changes the sensor's sensitivity to light. The higher the ISO, the more sensitive to light, but also the more grain you will see. In digital, the grain is called noise.
     
  4. TheHundreds

    TheHundreds

    379
    Jun 26, 2008
    NYC
    hmm how do i make it lighter without raising the is?
     
  5. What's your aperture?
     
  6. An exposure is based on 3 things:

    ISO - the sensitivity of the sensor chip to light
    aperture - the opening in the lens, relates to the f number
    shutter speed - how long the sensor is exposed to light

    If you drill a small hole through a piece of wood (aperture) and turn on a hose, it will take a long time to fill up a bucket. If you make the hole bigger, the bucket will fill faster.

    If you make the aperture opening big (low f numbers, ie. f/1.4, f/2), a lot of light gets in.
    If you make the aperture opening small (big f numbers, i.e. f/11, f/22), not much light gets in.

    If you keep the shutter open a long time (i.e. 1/10th sec, 2 sec), a lot of light gets in.
    If you open/close the shutter very quickly (i.e. 1/2000th sec), not much light comes in.

    Exposure relates to how much light you let in. You can choose to control this via the shutter speed (S mode), the aperture (A mode), or by setting both (M mode). Or you can let the camera choose both (P mode).

    So to get more light, you need to either open the aperture up more (low numbers) or leave the shutter open longer.
     
  7. Muonic

    Muonic

    Jun 14, 2006
    Looks like you have it in the "manual" exposure mode. Adjust the shutter speed and aperture until you get the proper exposure (check the meter in the viewfinder). Or try the "aperture" or "shutter" priority mode. And try reading the section in the manual about different exposure modes, and how to adjust them properly.
     
  8. dutchtrumpet

    dutchtrumpet

    493
    May 2, 2007
    Dallas
    Best book for beginners in my opinion. Great advice!
     
  9. TheHundreds

    TheHundreds

    379
    Jun 26, 2008
    NYC
    yeah but the lower the shutter speed is the more blur it gets but the apeture is at 5.6. I also want a smoother picture, the higher the iso the more noise. :/ i want to use a lower iso but it get's too underexposed.
     
  10. If you can't get a larger aperture than f/5.6, and you need shutter speed, and you don't want to go to high ISO, you need to add light: via flash or other light source.
     
  11. TheHundreds

    TheHundreds

    379
    Jun 26, 2008
    NYC
    yeah more light will be good.