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Something rare...

Discussion in 'Other Animals' started by Amarok, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. Amarok

    Amarok

    701
    Aug 25, 2008
    Prairie City OR
    Here is a photo I took earlier in the year. This is an Amur Leopard, there is an estimated remaining world population of under 40 of these animals left. I just thought I would share. This was taken with my D40 and the kit lens at the Oregon Zoo the day I got the camera.
    7d4597a3.
    NIKON D40    ---    55mm    f/7.1    1/30s    ISO 640
     
  2. SRA

    SRA

    Jul 29, 2005
    Orem, Utah
    Fantastic colors and contrast. Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. Very sad to think that this beautiful cat will be extinct in my lifetime. Thanks for sharing this photo.
     
  4. Amarok

    Amarok

    701
    Aug 25, 2008
    Prairie City OR
    That is one of the reasons I am sharing this photo. They figure that they would need a viable breeding population of at least 100 animals in order to bring the species back. So that will never happen, there is just not enough genetic variance out there to successfully repopulate the species. There are several in captivity in zoo's around the US, so I would recommend seeing if your local zoo has one. The Oregon Zoo actually has a pair.

    Oh by the way I'm going to school for my Biology (among others) with a particular focus on large predators. I currently work with a group that uses detection dogs to aid in research efforts.
     
  5. stphoto

    stphoto

    611
    Feb 8, 2008
    Syracuse, NY
    Detection dogs for predators? That's interesting since the predators would detect them as well. What predators are you looking to studay?
     
  6. Amarok

    Amarok

    701
    Aug 25, 2008
    Prairie City OR
    Well my personal interests are in studying wolves. We actually are non invasive and avoid actual contact with the animals. With predators in particular we only train the dogs to search for scat samples. With wolves and other canids we normally have to use female detection dogs as the males tend to try and mark samples, and can be much more aggressive if there is a confrontation.

    Our group has actually used detection dogs with predators ranging from bobcats to maned wolves to brown bears. Heck we have a dog that has worked on a couple of projects involving whales lol.
     
  7. stphoto

    stphoto

    611
    Feb 8, 2008
    Syracuse, NY
    Thank you for the explanation on the detection dogs. An excellent way to find vital information about animals that are very hard to get close to and study in the wild. I'd say it's low tech but a dogs sense of smell, hearing and sight are much better than ours.

    Whales, eh? Amazing! :smile:
     
  8. Amarok

    Amarok

    701
    Aug 25, 2008
    Prairie City OR
    Yep whale poop floats lol

    Here is a picture (not mine) of Fargo that has been used in several articles and the like. He was our resident whale dog. If you do a google image search for "fargo and whale" you will get a couple images of him working on the boat.

    fargoandcalf.


    EDIT: here is a link to the company I did my training with if you want to read up on the process and all of that a bit more. It also has some information on past projects they have worked on.
    http://www.packleaderdogtraining.net/DETECT_DOGS2.html
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 18, 2008
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