Steve Perry's Focus Shift Shooting workshop

Butlerkid

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I didn't know about it! But Yes, for $15 I will buy it. He always gets well past the basics and gives a lot of in depth tips and information. And I have just a few days to study before we leave for a 3 week trip!
 

Butlerkid

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WHOA! Although it says "Download" it is appearing that I cannot download the course and must view it on the website! I didn't read the fine details as I've bought from Steve before....... I've sent a question to Steve.
 
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Bought it and had downloaded the intro, but went ahead and watched online. Very interesting and set up camera per his recommendations will try it once it stops raining. Shows image capture for Landscape, Flower Macro and then a Frog macro. Uses Lightroom & Photoshop on the landscape, LR & Helicon on the flower and then LR & Zerene on the frog. Allready learned a bit on how to improve stacked imahges using photoshop. Now to determine if I want to get Helicon or Zerene software.

For $15 dont think you could go wrong.
 
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I'm not a photoshop user, so I'll have to try and translate the instructions to DxO PL.
Was not doing extensive amount in Photoshop except for the landscape image. The flower and frog image just used some Photoshop to do some additional cloning to further clean up the blended image. Once finished with the clone and some sharpening in the case of the frog went back into Lightroom to finish the image.

Don't use DxO so can't advise.
 
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I’ve watched a couple of videos. So far they are easy to follow. It annoys me he doesn’t appear to discuss effective aperture, which IMO is important when discussing macro.
 
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Allready learned a bit on how to improve stacked imahges using photoshop. Now to determine if I want to get Helicon or Zerene software.
When I began stacking images, Photoshop worked fine. Then I got to an image that Photoshop's stacking process rendered the scene unimaginably incomprehensible; touch ups were out of the question. That was when I decided upon using Helicon Focus. Both Zerene and Helicon work fine but I liked Helicon's 3D Viewer as a fun module, so I went with Helicon. However, I've used the Viewer twice at the most. I've never had to touch up anything in Helicon and I've used the default settings probably all but one time. That one time the need for different settings was obvious based on the information provided in Helicon's tutorial about settings.
 
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I did purchase it and have now watched the first several episodes through his stacking of photos of the John Oliver Cabin. As expected, I did pick up a couple of things that I had not previously thought of.

He suggests that after focusing on the nearest point, before you start collecting photos you should pull your first focus point a wee bit closer to leave a margin for error.

He also recommends setting the number of photos to a ridiculously large number because once the camera gets to infinity focus it will stop. For example, in the John Oliver Cabin sequence, he sets it to 90 images, but the camera only recorded 15. This apparently only applies to landscape stacks because for macro images you would never get to infinity focus.

He uses a focus step width of 4 for all subjects.
 
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he sets it to 90 images, but the camera only recorded 15
That's a waste in my mind in situations when there is no infinity to "stop" the camera and even in some situations where the lens can focus at infinity. Capturing four to six times more images than is needed will cause the shutter to die sooner than is necessary. Thought that may not be a practical concern, one never knows until the shutter has died whether it should have been a concern. After getting used to the number of captures that are needed in a given situation, my experience is that we can narrow the number of images down to no more than twice as many as are needed.

He uses a focus step width of 4 for all subjects.
That surprises me and goes against Nikon's recommendations. That doesn't mean his choice is wrong or bad; it just surprises me.

I always use step size 1 for macro images and step size 3 for other tabletop photography. I probably would use step size 5 for landscapes but have used focus shifting on a landscape scene only once.
 
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That's a waste in my mind in situations when there is no infinity to "stop" the camera and even in some situations where the lens can focus at infinity. Capturing four to six times more images than is needed will cause the shutter to die sooner than is necessary.
No waste at all. Set to capture 90, takes only 15 (as needed). End of shoot.
 
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