The Macro Club

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So excellent Jim--thank you, for an HQ alternative way to focus stack!
BTW, would love to see some of your work in here............................... Best, jt
What I have been using this technique for lately is not really macro, it's more in the line of product photography I'm doing gratis for a relative. Here are a couple of examples if you'll forgive me for posting something that's not actually a macro.

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Tim Grist
It certainly makes things easier for creating the focus stacks. Also its great for subjects which are in an awkward spot.

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This is a 90 image focus stack of a coffee bean

View attachment 1508415
Very impressive detail. You've got an efficient workflow going there..
 
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What I have been using this technique for lately is not really macro, it's more in the line of product photography I'm doing gratis for a relative. Here are a couple of examples if you'll forgive me for posting something that's not actually a macro.

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Thanks Jim--Yes, your methodology provides excellent results. Again, much appreciate you offering this knowledge to all of us--Best! jt
 
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So small are these damselflies that they’re difficult to locate with the human eye. I locate them by looking for reflections their wings throw against sunlight, or by looking for their shadows against the ground or on plants. This particular guy, although without a consort at the moment, is in no way discouraged; rather, he is practicing the motion needed to the bring his phallus (@ tail’s end) to the necessary position for successful coitus. People who have seen the ritual, are inspired by the heart-shape the pair makes when creating a new generation. Note the functionality of the segmented tail: the ritual is impossible without it.

D7000 w Sigma 150--no flash, no pods--cropped f/6.3
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kilofoxtrott

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So small are these damselflies that they’re difficult to locate with the human eye. I locate them by looking for reflections their wings throw against sunlight, or by looking for their shadows against the ground or on plants. This particular guy, although without a consort at the moment, is in no way discouraged; rather, he is practicing the motion needed to the bring his phallus (@ tail’s end) to the necessary position for successful coitus. People who have seen the ritual, are inspired by the heart-shape the pair makes when creating a new generation. Note the functionality of the segmented tail: the ritual is impossible without it.

D7000 w Sigma 150--no flash, no pods--cropped f/6.3
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Well Moony,
I remember how hard it was for me taking pictures of them in the beginning.
Meanwhile I realize the shape of them. If you move slowly, it's no problem to aproach to 2" close to them. Take care, your camera belt isn't moving.

Wonderful picture btw.
Klaus
 
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Well Moony,
I remember how hard it was for me taking pictures of them in the beginning.
Meanwhile I realize the shape of them. If you move slowly, it's no problem to aproach to 2" close to them. Take care, your camera belt isn't moving.

Wonderful picture btw.
Klaus
Klaus: Thanks for the kind comments--glad you like the pic. Consider that, when you use the word "them," it could be too inclusive. I've been shooting them for a quiet a while &, most of the time, it's very difficult to get close to them--& I know how to move slowly--I practice Yoga. I usually shoot the Damsels with the Sigma 1.4 TC & the APS-c of the D7000. Also, there are many different kinds of Damsels, which vary greatly from one another in size & temperament. & never confuse these guys with their, on the whole, much larger cousins, the Dragonflies. I usually get close to the Dragons without much effort. &, while I've had dragonflies land right on my hand, never had such an occurrence with a Damsel. I do not need to reach 2"--just the MFD of the Sigma 150mm. ;) I've never used a camera belt--what is it--how effective is it with these guys? I handhold all shots of insects, because they are on the move--not like a flower. jt
 
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What I have been using this technique for lately is not really macro, it's more in the line of product photography I'm doing gratis for a relative. Here are a couple of examples if you'll forgive me for posting something that's not actually a macro.

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Very nice Jim.
 
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So small are these damselflies that they’re difficult to locate with the human eye. I locate them by looking for reflections their wings throw against sunlight, or by looking for their shadows against the ground or on plants. This particular guy, although without a consort at the moment, is in no way discouraged; rather, he is practicing the motion needed to the bring his phallus (@ tail’s end) to the necessary position for successful coitus. People who have seen the ritual, are inspired by the heart-shape the pair makes when creating a new generation. Note the functionality of the segmented tail: the ritual is impossible without it.

D7000 w Sigma 150--no flash, no pods--cropped f/6.3
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Great shot Jt, you are always the best.
 
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Great shot Jt, you are always the best.
Mobi, thank you--really appreciate your generous support. Of course the word "best" is highly exclusive, ever elusive & not compatible with my work. However, it can have an inclusive use when applied as a goal, not as a reality--we can all seek to be our best! Best, jt
 
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East Midlands, UK
So small are these damselflies that they’re difficult to locate with the human eye. I locate them by looking for reflections their wings throw against sunlight, or by looking for their shadows against the ground or on plants. This particular guy, although without a consort at the moment, is in no way discouraged; rather, he is practicing the motion needed to the bring his phallus (@ tail’s end) to the necessary position for successful coitus. People who have seen the ritual, are inspired by the heart-shape the pair makes when creating a new generation. Note the functionality of the segmented tail: the ritual is impossible without it.

D7000 w Sigma 150--no flash, no pods--cropped f/6.3
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Excellent work jt, I like this picture a lot
 
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W Sigma 150mm & Sigma 1.4 TC, handheld & onboard flash f/6.3 effective 315mm w D7000
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New Hampshire
Here's a crop of a spider and some pollen from a Nikon D40, Sigma 150mm (pre-OS), f22, 1/250, iso 200, tripod
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Handheld, D40, Sigma 150mm, f8, 1/250, iso 200

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Handheld, D40, Sigma 150mm, f8, 1/250, iso 200

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Nice shot here and the yellow spider is very nice! I'm amazed you got 1/250th of a second (was this on-board flash) @ f/22 & ISO 200. My apologies, but I've been on outdoor adventure for an extended time without access to Internet. jt
 
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Nice shot here and the yellow spider is very nice! I'm amazed you got 1/250th of a second (was this on-board flash) @ f/22 & ISO 200. My apologies, but I've been on outdoor adventure for an extended time without access to Internet. jt
Thanks. It was so long ago I don't recall if it was onboard flash or if I had my SB800 back then....likely onboard. I was brand new to photography not that I'm much beyond that now.
 
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Thanks. It was so long ago I don't recall if it was onboard flash or if I had my SB800 back then....likely onboard. I was brand new to photography not that I'm much beyond that now.
Also of note, I had a split focus screen which I used for all my insects. I may install one in my D600 if I get into it again.
 
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