The POWER of Digial Photography....

JPS

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Thank you very much for the URL, Karen !

Extremely interesting video ! Proof -once again- that it mostly depends on the PHOTOGRAPHER's eye, technique and.... years of practice, but the "tools" definitely help -or do they make easier ?- to get better images !

Two of McCullin comments stroke me: the fact that he doesn't "chimp", because that distracts his eyes from the action or scenery, and the way he immediately adopted the AF-ON technique, allowing to lock the distance (or aperture, or both) and to recompose at will !

I'm very happy to have watched this 1/2 hour documentary (even though he was using a -pfewww- Canon :Curved:) !

.....apart from that, how's your husband going, Karen ? Did he recover ok ?

:smile:
J-P.
 

Butlerkid

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Karen - What a neat video. It was very interesting to hear McCullin's comments. I personally think that the great photographers of the past would be even greater today with our current tools.

Glad you enjoyed it, John. Even the videography was extremely well done!

Thank you very much for the URL, Karen !

Extremely interesting video ! Proof -once again- that it mostly depends on the PHOTOGRAPHER's eye, technique and.... years of practice, but the "tools" definitely help -or do they make easier ?- to get better images !

Two of McCullin comments stroke me: the fact that he doesn't "chimp", because that distracts his eyes from the action or scenery, and the way he immediately adopted the AF-ON technique, allowing to lock the distance (or aperture, or both) and to recompose at will !

I'm very happy to have watched this 1/2 hour documentary (even though he was using a -pfewww- Canon :Curved:) !

.....apart from that, how's your husband going, Karen ? Did he recover ok ?

:smile:
J-P.

Hi, J-P!

I also was struck by his comments about chimping. I did have to smile, though, because after he started using the digital camera, HE started to chimp a little! :wink: After all, there was nothing to chimp with film!

And he picked up the AF On concept right away.....it just made sense to him.

Justin is doing extremely well. In fact, he has a follow up appt with the cardiologist today!

Take care!
 

JPS

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.............And he picked up the AF On concept right away.....it just made sense to him......

How I wish I could be as fast as McCullin to pick up the AF-ON trick ?!?! I tried several times (and I DO find it extremely useful), but I keep forgetting it, so everytime I must shoot a fast event, I keep pressing the damn shutter button and wonder why the bloody image stays blured in my viewfinder..... until I remember that I should press the AF-ON button, but the "decisive moment" (according to H. Cartier-Bresson) is GONE !!!

:Curved:
J-P.
 

Butlerkid

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I can relate! :biggrin:

I, on the other hand, depress the AF-On button all the time! Even when I am trying to recompose the shot! DUH! :redface:

However, for anything moving, I love AF-ON!
 

McQ

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I can relate! :biggrin:

I, on the other hand, depress the AF-On button all the time! Even when I am trying to recompose the shot! DUH! :redface:

However, for anything moving, I love AF-ON!

Cool thread, and I have to laugh about this particular "Oops!"
When I first stated using AF-On, I did this so often when recomposing.
 
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Thanks for the pointer, Karen
I've long been a McCullin fan, and I'm happy for him that he's going to reap the benefits of digital from now on.
AF-On - absolutely!
I spent years in the darkroom fiddling about dodging, burning, using different paper grades. My photo life has been turned around as much by digital printers as the cameras.
Pity Nikon PR people missed the opportunity to get Don on board - but the main thing is the man will produce great photos whatever he uses.
Watching him in action has almost got me thinking I should try landscape - something I've never done. Black and white, of course!
 
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Thanks for pointing out the video. Truly inspiring. It makes me to want to try even harder to improve my skill.

Besides the chimping comment, I also like the last sentence he spoke in the video. "One must not start thinking about doing. You must do it."
 
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Great video. One thing I noticed and thought was cool...he doesn't chimp. Well, he never had to before, so why start now?
 

Butlerkid

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Glad ya'all enjoyed the video!

I was impressed by his willingness to try digital, especially since he is so successful and experienced in film!

He is still willing to learn and embrace new things! Bravo!
 
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I have enjoyed, along with others, this most interesting video. Digital has changed photography and AF has made our photography better, especially to those like me over 70. Our eyes are not what they used to be when we focused manually.
Softwares available today allow us to manipulate images in ways we never thought it would be possible. Like many other darkroom workers I remember that our photography in b&w was so limited with the techniques we were using then. Today software has changed that completely with a versatility that we could not even dream of at the time.
One of the most frustrating parts of color photography was the absence of contrasty paper to print our pictures, like we could do with b&w. Today it is so easy to add contrast or saturate colors or even desaturate selectively or as a whole.
Only some professional cameras had spot metering and even so it was no match to a good spot meter like a Pentax. Those meters are still invaluable to those professionals that use spot meter often but the new spot meters in camera are highly useful and practical since we do not have to carry another meter with us.
It did not come to me as a surprise that the gentleman in the video, a film user street and landscape photographer finds that he can do most of his photography with a 100mm and a 24mm lens. We are used to zoom lenses, of superior quality today which are very convenient to change focal lengths at will but we do not need a professional camera or lenses to do good photography. Indeed we have more gear than we need.
Digital has revolutionized photography. Its low grain makes it superior for enlargements and with the excellent low light performance of the new cameras we can do today what was only a dream during the film era.
I want to thank you for posting this video.

William Rodriguez
Miami, Florida.
 

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