Things people do that drive me bonkers....

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People walk their dogs on the school grounds where I go for exercise and as far as I know they are all good about cleaning up.

However...there's a sign that states animals are not allowed on school property. Also, there's a township leash law and a subset of the dog walkers allow their pets to walk along with them unrestrained. These rules don't ever appear to be enforced, so they are ignored.
I've seen unleashed dogs that are perfectly under control, and leashed dogs that are totally out of control.

One of the things that drives me crazy is when some adult lets their six or seven year old 'walk' their lab, or golden or even old english which are easily half (or more) the weight of the kid and a lot stronger. Even if the dog is friendly and tries to come bounding over to play with my dog it's a dangerous situation for the kid unless the dog is perfectly leash-trained.
 

Growltiger

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The only time I have actually been bitten by a dog was on a walk in the countryside.
A woman came the other way with a small terrier, unrestrained. It ran towards me, not barking or threatening in any way, swerved around me to get behind me and sank its teeth hard into my ankle. It then immediately let go and ran back to her.
She said "Don't worry, he is just being friendly."
 
One time I was out on the boardwalk shooting photos, minding my own business, when a woman with a Dalmatian approached. Without thinking, smiling pleasantly in greeting at the woman, at the same time I casually moved the camera in my hands to a more comfortable holding position (from what I'd been doing while shooting) and the dog immediately leaped at me and grabbed my elbow. I guess he or she was feeling threatened and that I was going to boink him or her on the head or do something to his or her owner......thankfully it was a gentle nip rather than a fierce bite, the dog's teeth didn't even break my skin, it was more like a warning -- "don't wave that big thing around!" It was scary but thankfully no physical harm done and the owner profusely apologized over and over. I know that Dalmatians tend to be more skittish than other dogs for whatever reason. After that whenever I see a dog (regardless of breed) and its owner approaching me, whether on the boardwalk or somewhere else, I immediately very carefully and gently shift my camera and lens to a downward position not pointing at anything or anyone or sometimes I simply hold it still and don't move it at all. That Dalmatian taught me a good lesson!
 
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The only time I have actually been bitten by a dog was on a walk in the countryside.
A woman came the other way with a small terrier, unrestrained. It ran towards me, not barking or threatening in any way, swerved around me to get behind me and sank its teeth hard into my ankle. It then immediately let go and ran back to her.
She said "Don't worry, he is just being friendly."
My first indication that someone is clueless is when their dog is running at me/my dog and they yell, "don't worry he's friendly". OK. Maybe he is. But at a minimum how do you know that me/my dog are? Not to mention that dogs have personalities just like people. Some of them just don't get along. Every time my dog has ever been attacked by another dog it was immediately preceded by the "don't worry he's friendly" battle cry.
 

Butlerkid

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My first indication that someone is clueless is when their dog is running at me/my dog and they yell, "don't worry he's friendly". OK. Maybe he is. But at a minimum how do you know that me/my dog are? Not to mention that dogs have personalities just like people. Some of them just don't get along. Every time my dog has ever been attacked by another dog it was immediately preceded by the "don't worry he's friendly" battle cry.
Agreed. My sweet boy (Springer Spaniel) became aggressive after being attacked twice by larger dogs. It was like "HEY, I"m gonna fight back - don't mess with me!" With young children, he was still he meek self...........although I still watched him like a hawk. He was, after all, "a dog"....and not a reasoning person.
 
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My vet once pointed out that dogs only have two defenses - they can run away from danger or they can use their teeth. They can't push you away, or kick, or throw something at you. Barks are simply warnings. Any dog, if it feels threatened for whatever reason (whether the threat is real or someone just adjusting their camera), will use its teeth.

I once had a dog that was incredibly agitated by any kind of smoke. He went absolutely crazy and would aggressively bark at anyone who walked by (or came into the house) who smelled of smoke. He never bit anyone but he made it clear to me that he perceived someone who smelled like smoke to be a threat so I was vigilant about controlling him. He absolutely loved everyone else.

The smoke buster . . .
DSC_2606-Edit.jpg
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... I still watched him like a hawk. He was, after all, "a dog"....and not a reasoning person.
This is what the "friendly dog" people don't get. Dogs are dogs, not people. No matter how well we understand dog behavior and/or know our own dogs, they are individuals and react to stimuli that we may be completely unaware of. I've lived with and trained dogs all my life and have this one for ten years and I still have no clue as to what she sees or why she reacts poorly to some dogs and not others. So I just assume she's going to react poorly to all of them.
 

McQ

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I never, ever let my dog (Beky) go to a person or another dog first. I'm always between the other person/dog and my dog. She's a former military dog, and although well-trained and good with people and other dogs, I'll never take that risk that something might set her off.

Her handlers taught that, and our trainer teaches it as well. Putting me between her and new dogs/people does a couple of things. It reinforces to her that I'm in charge and I'm the one protecting her (it enhances her trust in me) and it's a physical barrier. It also gives her a chance to settle down and relax a bit if she's keyed up. Same for the other dog.

We were just doing some work this morning with our trainer. She offers Saturday "pack walks" where all of her clients bring their dogs for walking training and continued behavioral training. It's so great to see 20 - 25 dogs all behaving calmly and sociably.

I've had so many people want to let their dogs go nose to nose with Beky when first encountering us. I've gotten very good at quickly explaining why that's not the best idea and passing along that learning. I've only had one case where someone tried to press the matter, telling me to at least let the dogs sniff each others' hind ends. I declined politely, saying that it takes a millisecond for one of them to snap around and bite. I don't care if it makes me look like a dog snob or overly cautious. I'd rather not have a 70 lb. Shepherd/Malinois clamp down on someone or their dog.
 
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Back to the horses... One of the places I used to backpack quite a bit was the Flattops Wilderness. There is an outfitter just outside the wilderness who takes groups into the wilderness on horseback. This means the trails are mined with horse poop and the trails erode much faster (similar to the greater impact that heavy trucks have on the highways but, unlike heavy trucks, the outfitter isn't on the hook to pay for the damage he/she causes.)

I've shifted to other, more remote wilderness areas (remote in the sense that they are farther away from population centers). And, in truth, I don't get out as much due to a wonky knee and hip. But that attitude, that irresponsibility, still burns me.
 
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Our trainer told us that whenever someone walking their dog (or worse off-leash) tells her 'It's ok, my dog's friendly' she yells 'Mine isn't!' and that pretty much ends the interaction....
That's my tactic as well. Started doing that a couple of years ago. Still doesn't phase some people.
 
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Our trainer told us that whenever someone walking their dog (or worse off-leash) tells her 'It's ok, my dog's friendly' she yells 'Mine isn't!' and that pretty much ends the interaction.

BTW, her dog was this wonderfully sociable golden.

HAd a problem with someone like that at the dog park. Too the little nitwit into the all dog area from the small dog area. SMall dog area he is off leash, all dog I put him on a long retractable one (its like 13 acres, prairie grass and the little nitwit is all black and will disappear in the grass). Well her dog, literally 40lbs heavier than my then 6 month old pug, kept running over and bowling him over when I was walking him away from them. 4th time I got a bit pissy with them and told them to either control their dog or get it out of the park. One of the park rules is you must maintain control of your dog at all times including off leash.

Another guy had 2 adult male black and tans who were highly aggressive towards other dogs. Idiot had them in the small dog section (under 25lbs only). Lady had her yorkie in there and they tried to go after it but couldnt get there because he had their leashes around a pole at the time the lady walked into teh small dog section. Guarantee if he had them in his hand, they would had pulled away from him and attacked the yorkie. She grabbed her dog and high tailed it out of the gates.

You have an aggressive dog(s), then keep them out of dog parks or at least muzzle them.

We have 3 dog areas here, 1 is fenced and requires a permit to go in (one I usually go to) and the other 2 are open and free. I've taken Barrett out to one of the free ones a couple times, no issues other than people that dont clean up after their dogs or let their dogs off leash where they arent supposed to.


barrettnewcheesebone.jpg
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BTW all his toys were piled up behind the fan when I left to buy a new cheese bone. Gone for 30 min.🤣
 
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HAd a problem with someone like that at the dog park. Too the little nitwit into the all dog area from the small dog area. SMall dog area he is off leash, all dog I put him on a long retractable one (its like 13 acres, prairie grass and the little nitwit is all black and will disappear in the grass). Well her dog, literally 40lbs heavier than my then 6 month old pug, kept running over and bowling him over when I was walking him away from them. 4th time I got a bit pissy with them and told them to either control their dog or get it out of the park. One of the park rules is you must maintain control of your dog at all times including off leash.

Another guy had 2 adult male black and tans who were highly aggressive towards other dogs. Idiot had them in the small dog section (under 25lbs only). Lady had her yorkie in there and they tried to go after it but couldnt get there because he had their leashes around a pole at the time the lady walked into teh small dog section. Guarantee if he had them in his hand, they would had pulled away from him and attacked the yorkie. She grabbed her dog and high tailed it out of the gates.

You have an aggressive dog(s), then keep them out of dog parks or at least muzzle them.

We have 3 dog areas here, 1 is fenced and requires a permit to go in (one I usually go to) and the other 2 are open and free. I've taken Barrett out to one of the free ones a couple times, no issues other than people that dont clean up after their dogs or let their dogs off leash where they arent supposed to.


View attachment 1688422
BTW all his toys were piled up behind the fan when I left to buy a new cheese bone. Gone for 30 min.🤣
What a cute pup. In our state park that we walk in off-leash is permitted as long as you're 500ft or more from the car park. We accept some level of risk as the price for letting our hunting breed dog exercise her instincts. But I figure the same goes for everyone else. If they let them off leash they accept some level of risk in doing so. If dogs behave aggressively toward me/my dog and don't respond to owner's voice control or owner doesn't attempt to control them that risk is the dog getting a face full of pepper spray. Sorry, that's life. That said I've yet to spray one. Usually just pulling the can out of my pocket encourages the owner to get their dog under control.
 
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Where we live some people are on a 'there and back' walk, they leave their 'dog bag' on the side of the path so that they can pick it up on the way back and dispose of it.
 
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