Underexposures..questions

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by goodquest, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. What are some of the causes of underexposures in bright sun light? I don’t seem to have this problem with my 70-300, but it happens a lot with my 18-200. I just want to know a few of the basics to watch out for.

    Thanks in advance



    Some examples



    http://www.half-lime.com/goodquest2/underexposed/
     
  2. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    You Shot more into the sun.

    Use flash. But maybe have been to far away..(fire truck) is the one I looked at

    Just because it is bright sunlight outside, you need it in the right direction. Shining on the front of the subject.

    If you use PS you can bbring out the shadow with the shadow/highlights.

    Although I know you would prefer to shoot it right.
    However sometines we have to shoot at what we have and can not move to the right place or flash it.
    Then have to correct it , if not to dark
     
  3. cotdt

    cotdt

    Jul 14, 2007
    Bay Area, USA
    you need to get more dynamic range via taking the picture at multiple exposures and combining them.
     
  4. Any time you get underexposure with any lens it has to do with what you are metering. First thing to look at is to see if you have your camera on spot, centerweighted or matrix. Next you have to understand that whatever your camera is metering it tries to make it a medium grey. Let's say you were on spot metering and it was looking at a white subject, it would make that subject medium grey and look underexposed. When you change lenses the camera meter may look at more or less of a given subject. If you were looking at an overall scene with a 300mm lens it may include less sky than if you were looking at that same scene with a 200mm lens. In that case the 200mm lens may look more underexposed because of that. In other words, more bright sky would bias the meter towards underexposing the scene.

    Don't blame the lens for underexposing your images. It is a combination of what your camera sees and how you as the photographer handle that. To prove that set up your camera on a tripod and focus on a scene. Now meter the back of your hand and zero out your meter and then take the shot. Now change lenses and do the same thing. Both shots should be pretty much the same. By the way, the back of your hand is pretty close to medium grey as seen by the camera.
     

  5. If I remember correctly I was using dynamic area AF and Matrix metering. I will try what you explained for educational purposes.
     
  6. photoshooter

    photoshooter Guest

    If you are using the 18-200, please remember, it is not a constant aperture lens. the 18-200 will change aperture as you zoom in or out.

    3.5 at 18mm
    5.6 at 200mm

    Where you in aperture or shutter priority.
    Where was your light coming from, what you may think is underexposure, could be shadow, if you do not use fill flash,, then increase the EV.

    The info you provide is inconclusive.
     
  7. SoCalBob

    SoCalBob

    618
    Feb 9, 2006
    Riverside, CA
    Will,

    Gordon's assessment is right on. Diagnosing your underexposure problem was as easy for me as (1) knowing that your were using matrix metering and (2) simply looking at the shadows the fire engines were casting.

    Your photos are perfect examples of why people say that midday in bright sunlight is the worst possible time to take pictures. The background is bright, the sky is bright, but your subjects (the fire engines) are shadows cast by the nearly vertical sun. Matrix metering averages the whole scene and comes up with a compromise exposure, which it did pretty well in these pics, leaving the fire engines in the shadows underexposed.

    My suggested solution? Either center-weighted metering or spot metering would certainly have exposed the fire engines better, but also would likely have blown out some of the bright highlights. As Phil says, these pictures present the camera with a greater dynamic range than it is capable of handling.

    Next time tell them to delay the parade until later in the afternoon.
     
  8. Where you in aperture or shutter priority.
    I was in Automatic (P)
    Where was your light coming from,
    above me (noon), then off my back, I was facing east and sun was west.

    what you may think is underexposure, could be shadow, if you do not use fill flash,, then increase the EV.

    Good idea I will try this.

    The info you provide is inconclusive.[/QUOTE]

    What information do you need? I will provide it if I can.
     
  9. My suggested solution? Either center-weighted metering or spot metering would certainly have exposed the fire engines better, but also would likely have blown out some of the bright highlights. As Phil says, these pictures present the camera with a greater dynamic range than it is capable of handling.

    Thank you, I will try Center-weighted or spot metering and practice taking pictures Of things in midday sun. What confused me is that I was using my 70-300 at a Baseball game at midday (same metering) and did not experience this problem. Maybe it was the suns reflection off of pavement vs. grass. I will be going on Vacation soon and I know I will be taking some pictures in midday sun. I guess I better Practice, practice and practice some more.

    Thanks to all who replied, I’m all ways open to suggestions
     
  10. Mostly I argee with the assesments and advice here.

    If I would make an observation it would be that your "images" are not underexposed.
    More accurately, your "subjects" are underexposed in a overall frame that is exposed quite as the camera's designers intended.

    A washed-out sky and perfectly exposed subject (such as in spot metering) would, to my eyes, be less desirable and vastly less post-processable in Photoshop or other sofrware.

    My suggestion.....Photoshop curves......the tool I have until physics brings us sensors with wider latitude.

    Try, quite simply, to drag the center of the curve up a titch to bring up your midtones and....viola....you'll appreciate the nice job your meter is doing.

    just my .02
     
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