Unusual Grain Silo Construction

Joined
Mar 16, 2008
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2,000
Location
Oregon
After a long day at a seminar this weekend, the light was kind of neat, so we drove around in farm country to hunt down something to take pictures of. We came across this grain silo which sticks up and can be seen for miles. The construction is like none other I’ve ever seen. Probably the first 2/3's of the height of the building is made out of either 2x6 or 2x8, or maybe even 2x10 boards laid flat. Above the windows is more traditional construction. No attempt to be artistic with these shots or any fancy processing. Just trying to show the building. Photos were taken in 7 pm sunlight that had just come out from behind clouds.

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Joined
Jul 24, 2010
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101
Location
California
That was and still easy a common site in Western Canada.
Inside is is more interesting. They are divided up into sections to store different types of grains. They are solid built from lumber laid flat.Anytime I seen one dismantled, they use to get the top part off, let in air out for a while (weeks) and then set off a small charge of TNT to loosen the dust inside.

here's a link to other examples
http://www.pbase.com/grainelev/saskatchewan_grain_elevators

As kids we used to get hired by the Elevator Agents to climb in from the top and go down and clean out different sections. With out any air masks, safety lines, etc.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Messages
2,000
Location
Oregon
That was and still easy a common site in Western Canada.

While the style of the grain elevator may still be fairly common in places, the construction of this one is what is so unusual. The first two thirds of the elevator are built with the boards laying flat, and that is how the walls are formed. There was an open window near the bottom of the elevator that really showed the construction, but I did not take a photo of it. Look closely at the sides of the elevator. You will see that the boards are laying flat until you get up to the windows, where more normal construction was done. There, you will notice the face of the boards are showing, where as the lower two thirds of the building, only the edge of the boards show. None of the photos in your gallery show this type of construction.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
101
Location
California
While the style of the grain elevator may still be fairly common in places, the construction of this one is what is so unusual. The first two thirds of the elevator are built with the boards laying flat, and that is how the walls are formed. There was an open window near the bottom of the elevator that really showed the construction, but I did not take a photo of it. Look closely at the sides of the elevator. You will see that the boards are laying flat until you get up to the windows, where more normal construction was done. There, you will notice the face of the boards are showing, where as the lower two thirds of the building, only the edge of the boards show. None of the photos in your gallery show this type of construction.

Because the siding is off in your pictures, and the siding is on the one I posted. I built grain Elevators for Cargill. You also have to remember that the part with the boards on flat, is where the grain will be stored, therefore more pressure against the walls. Above that you might have augers that transport the grain from the shute down below to the assigned storage bin.
 
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