Using Professional Photosop by Dan Margulis

Discussion in 'Retouching and Post Processing' started by jeremyInMT, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. jeremyInMT

    jeremyInMT Guest

    I have retouched an image using some bits and pieces from the book in the subject. I have used apply image, selective ( negative b channel in lab) sky smoothing, sharpening using a duplicate image in CMYK and applying the K channel to sharpen and then going to a channel mixer in the green channel and increasing green to 115% and reducing blue to -15% (in the green channel for both). I had someone else take the shot, so that's why there was so much retouching to do. Let me know if I've gone too far, not far enough, or simply headed in the wrong direction.

    Before:
    [​IMG]

    After:
    [​IMG]

    If you want to see bigger versions, go here for before (and then click on the medium size image):
    http://www.mastersphoto.net/copper/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=1&pos=0

    Here for After:
    http://www.mastersphoto.net/copper/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=1&pos=1
     
  2. Jeremy,

    The sky is much improved in the PP version - looks like a Velvia 50 slide. The only thing I see is that the shadows on your shirt in the PP version look much more blue and caught my eye. I can see a lot more detail in your face, which really improves it (since you're wanting us to look at you, not the landscape, right? :smile:).

    Sean
     
  3. sfoxjohn

    sfoxjohn

    May 1, 2005
    Marlton, NJ
    Jeremy,

    I agree with Sean that the left side of the face has more detail "after", but it looks like there is too much blue everywhere. My Monitor is calibrated - but who knows?

    What I would have done first is use Shadows/highlights to bring out the left side of the face, and then very little after that. Maybe curves to restore some of the contrast lost using S/H. I'll try this suggestion myself and if it looks Ok I'll post. (Sometimes when you put your money where your mouth is, you just choke. Lol)
     
  4. sfoxjohn

    sfoxjohn

    May 1, 2005
    Marlton, NJ
    Jeremy, I copied the large version from your site and reduced image size to fit here when finished.

    Steps: 1. Shadow/highlights to open shadows.
    2. Adj. curve to restore contrast and change overall brightness a little.
    3. A small amount of sharpening.

    [​IMG]

    Was it taken in Glacier NP?
     
  5. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Thats better John. I was thinking of doing that:>)) heehee but I didn't
    You forgot the horizon..lol
     
  6. sfoxjohn

    sfoxjohn

    May 1, 2005
    Marlton, NJ
    Gale, if you tilt the horizon, you tilt the people. Lol
     
  7. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    No:>))
    He straightened it in his second photo. Go look.
    You got me laughing..lolol
     
  8. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Tilted people
    roflmao
     
  9. sfoxjohn

    sfoxjohn

    May 1, 2005
    Marlton, NJ

    You're right!! I hadn't noticed. People look OK. Guess he didn't need too much correction.
     
  10. jeremyInMT

    jeremyInMT Guest

    Boy, that shadow/highlight move really washed out contrast on my two calibrated monitors.
     
  11. jeremyInMT

    jeremyInMT Guest

    Sean, thanks for the comments. The devil is in the details as they say and I should have kept a better eye on those shadows. I really was going for the nicely saturated velvia style for this (which I should have stated in the OP). The picture had a lot of flare and pulling out detail was somewhat difficult. When I went to sharpen, I saw that using USM gave too many halos in the light areas so I went and made a copy of the document, went to CMYK, sharpened K and then applied it to the image. I maybe should have gone to Lab done USM on a seperate layer on the L channel, then gone back to sRGB and used the layer's darken mode or something like that.
     
  12. Iliah

    Iliah

    Jan 29, 2005
    nowhere
    Dear John,

    Because Shadow/Highlight is actually USM, it often leaves halos. You can see it around the slopes where the mountains meet the sky. Dan deals with that in Chapters 17 and 18, explaining how to avoid the halos and to limit the damage; and what alternatives, though more tiresome, we have to Shadow/Highlight command.
     
  13. sfoxjohn

    sfoxjohn

    May 1, 2005
    Marlton, NJ
    Thanks Iliah. I hadn't picked up on halo around the mountain tops.

    Does my version look like it washed out the picture's contrast on your monitor? I just did a calibration two days ago (19" LaCie). I'm concerned, because that would mean everything I've posted for the last 9 months would look pretty awful, but Jeremy's reply was the first time anyone mentioned it.
     
  14. jeremyInMT

    jeremyInMT Guest

    Dan's book is a great book so far. I haven't finished it yet but am working my way through it. There is a lot to chew on, and sometimes I struggle putting everything together. In the learning phase of some of these things (like I guess in this picture) I tend to forget some of my basics while playing with the new "toys". I remember in physics class that while we were studying the basics, we'd leave out friction. I think that's kind of what I did here. I was working on fixing some of the problems and I didn't account for friction (the things Sean spotted (wb, and there are probably others)). I have started to realize though that one of the most important things is having some sort of end target in mind. The intent of the image is really the scene and us in the picture just to show us there. We're too far back to have us as the real subject. I have a lot to learn with photography still. There are days when I feel like I have taken a step or two backward. I guess in the end, the image wasn't too hot to start out with and I wanted to punch up the color and sharpen without too much distraction. The color and shape of the scenery are really the top two things about the picture for me.
     
  15. Iliah

    Iliah

    Jan 29, 2005
    nowhere
    Dear John,

    The image is not washed out. But it lacks some contrast the original scene had. Contrast is a matter of taste, and I work with it as if it is B/W photo. You can set and saturation adjustment layer and turn the saturation control down so that you will see very little colour in the image; then work out the contrast with a curve adjustment layer in luminosity blending mode. When the photo will look like a good b/w photo, then you can bring the colour back. As with shooting, contrast is a targeted parameter. You set the contrast depending on the output media capabilities, and making decisions which details in shadows and highlights you are ready to sacrifice.

    Dynamic range is not a safenet for exposure errors, output media is unable to reproduce more then 7 stops. Compressing 12 stops of b/w film, 10 stops of camera dynamic range, or 8 stops of slide film to those 6-7 stops you can print you need to make hard decisions.
     
  16. Iliah

    Iliah

    Jan 29, 2005
    nowhere
    Dear Jeremy,

    I would take the scene with you looking into the scene, too - not only into the camera. When I first looked at the scene, I thought of one thing I would do - clone out those two nice people :wink: The scene is beautiful and well-captured.

    It is pretty usual in this trade to take a step back and to get rid of some habits to make two steps forward.

    We were discussing a lot with Dan where to set the contrast, and tend to think that the contrast, shadows and highlights we can try to get close in raw converter.
     
  17. I found your original edit a wee bit too saturated and the other edits a little washed out so I gave it a whirl... only had the small photo to go from since your link didn't seem to bring me to the right place. Basic edits in Lightroom, then exported to PS to add a screen layer which I reduced the opacity on and then used the lasso heavily feathered to delete the top part of the layer to keep the nice contrast while lightening up the bottom part. Then just did a little sharpening and dodging.

    Took about 5 mins... am certain you folks can do a better job than I did, but I wanted to give it a shot. If I were to do it again, I'd bring down the greens slightly in saturation... but was fun playing :smile:

    [​IMG]
     
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