Warning! Worst headache of your life.

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Warning! Worst headache of your life.

If you have such a headache you may be having a stroke. Immediately tell someone and proceed to a medical center or call for help. Time is critical. Other stroke signs are limb weakness, sagging facial muscles, and slurred speech.

Nearly 2 years ago I had a hemorrhagic stroke on my Optical Lobe, which days later would wipe out half of my eyesight.

On a Sunday I was injured over the right eyebrow by a very large swinging electrical plug, resulting in swelling and a black eye. I blamed the early warning of a vision issue on the swelling. The next night I ignored the horrible headache.

I went to my neurologist 36 hours later., I had been seeing him for vertigo, he quickly diagnosed the stroke and we drove the 5 block to the Medical Center. I walked in presented his card and told them the issue. I remember very little after that. I became aware a couple of days later while in a sodium crash, which really messes with one's memory. Fortunately, I had a great recovery. within months I was miles away from the day I first realized I could only see half of the screen on my phone. I have my sight and know that I was very very lucky.

PA, Jim T, posted about his stroke and his incredible recovery, while in a foreign land, really happy for him and we messaged a bit and as I recall Jim did not have a headache.
Unfortunately, I did not get away scot-free. That part of the brain controls other things, and for almost 2 years I have found myself uninterested in taking pictures. I had a long talk with my sympathetic neurologist 3 months ago and let it all out, he told me what I had already concluded.

He did not say this but agreed with my conclusion that my mind's eye is gone. I do not see a possible image in the mundane everyday items that others would naturally pass over, nor do I turn the truck around to go back and capture a building or unusual subject. I am not sure I even see art the same way.

Not complaining, I know I am lucky. I started to write this warning back then, and then after I talked to Jim, now the 2-year mark is closing in.

I do hope folks will take note of the WORST HEADACHE OF YOUR LIFE.

Cheers to all.
 
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Joined
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Really sorry to hear of your lost vision, Tom. I know I was very lucky to escape with no permanent damage or impairment.

My wife said that I did complain of a severe headache when my stroke occurred, but I don't remember that. So yes, a severe headache is a possible indicator and should be respected.

I was fortunate in the type of stroke I had. It was a non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Studies indicate that most who survive this stroke initially make a full recovery. Also, there are no known risk factors. The cause is not known.

I had none of the usual risk factors of stroke. My blood pressure has always been low, my cholesterol is low, I have never smoked, and I am not overweight. I have a healthy diet and exercise daily. So it can happen to anyone.
 
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Jim, I have been shooting since a very young age, it is in my DNA. I found my mother in 2011 and she was a photographer, that sent a chill down my back when my sister told me, guess I shared her brain wiring.
There was a post here many years ago about why do you take pics, I would like to find it. So the inner eye is gone. I maybe took 3K frames this year including pano and micro and a massive birthday party for an 82 YO. Normal would have been 35/40K+ including stacking Etc. and wear out a body ever so often. Oh well, my gear will last :). So glad you are doing well.
 
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When my wife and I were in medical school over 30 years ago, we had a neurology professor who left an indelible mark on our brains regarding headaches. He taught us that when patients complain about "the worst headache of their life", they are often having an intracranial bleed or a stroke. Take that phrase seriously!

About 10 years ago a neighbor who often had migraine headaches came to our door complaining to my wife that she was having "the worst headache of her life". My wife ran her to the ER where she was found to have a spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.
 
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Sorry to hear about your loss, but thrilled with your recovery.
I lost the majority of my vision from my right eye with a retinal issue about 3 years ago. I was right eye dominant with perfect vision right eye and poor vision left eye since I was a child. It was simply weird looking at the world primarily through my left eye. I could see a sign, but not understand what it said. It was almost like my left eye was stupid. I went to neurologists, opthamologists, neuroopthamologists, etc. There was no real way to measure or quantitate my issues. I was told nothing to do but that hopefully, even in my mid 60’s the brain would relearn. It was like retraining a child. It has gotten much better. 3 surgeries later and my right eye vision has also improved almost back to normal. For a while I could not compose a photograph as I tried to learn. Now, I think I am back to normal shooting except everything is tilted 3-5degrees if I do not use a level. What I am trying to say is give it time. It is amazing what we can relearn to do.
Gary
 
Joined
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Messages
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Sorry to hear about your loss, but thrilled with your recovery.
I lost the majority of my vision from my right eye with a retinal issue about 3 years ago. I was right eye dominant with perfect vision right eye and poor vision left eye since I was a child. It was simply weird looking at the world primarily through my left eye. I could see a sign, but not understand what it said. It was almost like my left eye was stupid. I went to neurologists, opthamologists, neuroopthamologists, etc. There was no real way to measure or quantitate my issues. I was told nothing to do but that hopefully, even in my mid 60’s the brain would relearn. It was like retraining a child. It has gotten much better. 3 surgeries later and my right eye vision has also improved almost back to normal. For a while I could not compose a photograph as I tried to learn. Now, I think I am back to normal shooting except everything is tilted 3-5degrees if I do not use a level. What I am trying to say is give it time. It is amazing what we can relearn to do.
Gary
Thanks for the encouragement, and I am lucky to have my sight. Very happy you have recovered. I will know I am well when I never go anywhere without a camera again. I have had many comments over the past 2 years, "where is your camera" they have been such a part of my life regardless of my skill level.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Central Georgia, USA
When my wife and I were in medical school over 30 years ago, we had a neurology professor who left an indelible mark on our brains regarding headaches. He taught us that when patients complain about "the worst headache of their life", they are often having an intracranial bleed or a stroke. Take that phrase seriously!

About 10 years ago a neighbor who often had migraine headaches came to our door complaining to my wife that she was having "the worst headache of her life". My wife ran her to the ER where she was found to have a spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.
Your neighbor was truly lucky you lived there, I hope she recovered as well as I have.
 
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And all you men over 50 don't forget your annual PSA test and the finger up the backside
I'm over 75 now and my physician doesn't want to do this any more. My neighbor across the street, who is about my age, is now dying of cancer that started in his prostate. It was detected by a high PSA reading but too late.
 
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
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Location
Central Georgia, USA
I'm over 75 now and my physician doesn't want to do this any more. My neighbor across the street, who is about my age, is now dying of cancer that started in his prostate. It was detected by a high PSA reading but too late.
That is unfortunate, one would think there were some other early signs.
 
Joined
May 1, 2005
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Otaki Beach, New Zealand
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Philip Armitage
I'm over 75 now and my physician doesn't want to do this any more. My neighbor across the street, who is about my age, is now dying of cancer that started in his prostate. It was detected by a high PSA reading but too late.
I was lucky, my doctor noticed the routine but regular PSA levels starting to rise about 5 years ago - I was 66 at the time. After that a biopsy confirmed aggressive but early stages of prostate cancer, radiation treatment seems to have knocked the nasties on the head
 

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