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Washington DC

Discussion in 'Landscapes, Architecture, and Cityscapes' started by asnpcwiz, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. asnpcwiz

    asnpcwiz

    384
    May 27, 2009
    USA
    I have lived in the DC area my entire live, but this weekend was my first time in the White House. They don't allow photos IN the White House, but here are a couple of shots from my weekend.

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  2. asnpcwiz

    asnpcwiz

    384
    May 27, 2009
    USA
    Hate to bump my own thread, but I am really looking for some input on these pics.

    The first pic was processed slightly to increase the redness of the building. It was a bit cloudy at that point in time and the true redness didn't come through...I'm hoping I didn't over do it so that the building looks fake. The more I look at it, the more I think the picture is a little slanted. Doesn't appear to be completely straight. Any thoughts?

    Second pic was basically only a straighten.
     
  3. Nice ones. Is the red realistic, or is it too much? I go for realistic in my shots.
     
  4. JusPlainCrayzee

    JusPlainCrayzee Administrator Administrator

    I think I'm kind of the opposite of Alex. I agree that the photo should look realistic, but I also love saturated colors, so for me #1 works well. As far as the building not being straight, I think you're right - it's not. It also seems to me that it's tilting backwards a bit. Some perspective straightening should fix that right up, though...

    #2? Weeelll...it's a nice shot...of a white house. I think that if this were my photo, I'd probably change out the sky and I'd crop out some of the grass in the foreground and clone out the truck (or whatever that is) on the right side by the hedges.
     
  5. The washed out skies aren't doing you any favors with these. Although it isn't always possible, it's much better to shoot in better light (generally early or late in the day). At a minimum, I would have used a polarizer while shooting these.

    Sometimes, a little post processing effort can help improve the sky. I'll selectively adjust the contrast and brightness of the sky before working on the buildings.

    Both photos suffer from vertical distortion...which makes the building appear as though they are falling backwards. The best way to address this is at the time of the shoot by keeping the camera parallel to the ground. If that isn't possible, this can easily be fixed during post processing. I happen to use a Photoshop plug-in called PTLens to help fix distortion.

    When composing a photo, I will usually myself what it is I want to convey and what I want the viewer to see. For example, if I was taking that photo of the White House, I would have focused more attention on the building by cropping in much tighter on the building--especially since the sky isn't contributing much to the image at all. As one of the earlier viewers already commenting, some cloning to eliminate distracting elements in the photos is also a very handy post processing skill to acquire and can do wonders to improve compositions.

    I hope this helps...
    Glenn
     
  6. asnpcwiz

    asnpcwiz

    384
    May 27, 2009
    USA
    Awesome, thanks for the suggestion guys. I never even noticed that the buildings seem to lean backwards. I can understand what you mean now when you say that. I know my mistake is that I typically shoot upwards at a building...Is that not what I should be doing?

    I'm still new to processing so I don't really know all the tricks yet. I don't know how to just work in a single element of the image...such as JUST the sky. I guess I'll have to learn.

    As for the white house shot, how can I make the building not seem to lean backwards? It's slightly elevated from my view so if I would have kept the lens parallel to the groud, than the white house would not be the center of the shot...if that makes any sense. Are you saying I need to possibly step on something to raise my vantage point?
     
  7. Bob,

    Many times it is not feasible to hold the lens parallel to the ground and retain a good composition. Sometimes I will zoom out...which makes it easier...only to crop the photo later.

    Most times I end up fixing the vertical distortion while post processing. The PTLens or other such plug-ins make this relatively easy to accomplish.

    Glenn
     
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