We're BEGINNERS!

Joined
Feb 6, 2006
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TX originally from Louisiana
My daughter and I are beginner macro photographers = the way I got into this is a long story. I'm going to post a photo just to get the ball rolling. The weather
conditions was very windy, cloudy, and muddy.
D500, 105mm macro, f-stop 3.2, aperture priority mode, my shutter speed and my ISO are both where
I failed - and I knew better. I had dark glasses on due to eye issues. Lesson learned for sure.
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Butlerkid

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Rutledge, Tennessee
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Karen
You need all the DOF you can get with macro. Either focus stack or at least F8 of F11..................... If the conditions are windy....set you shutter speed and use Auto ISO...............
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
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SW Virginia
You could go to f/8 and, say, 1/400s shutter speed and get the same exposure with much more depth of field. Then increasing iso to 200 you could go to f/11 for even more depth of field.
 
One place I do not wear my glasses or my sunglasses is when I'm shooting, and yes, on a sunny day outdoors it can be brutal at times! I have the diopter setting thingy on my camera set to my needs and so don't wear the glasses while shooting (although of course have them with me for all other purposes).

I tend to shoot macro with at least f/13 and usually higher, and I adjust my shutter speed to the situation (I shoot in manual mode only now, eventually became frustrated with Aperture Priority) and I use Auto ISO. This way I have control over the shutter speed and I gauge it according to the situation (a still, calm day? A windy day? Indoors where there is no wind?). How's the light? Sometimes an adjustment with the exposure compensation dial takes care of the issue. With my mirrorless camera I can immediately see when I'm likely to be underexposing or overexposing and can quickly make appropriate adjustments before ever pressing the shutter release. I let the ISO do its own thing and rarely do I regret that. Most of the time it works quite nicely with what I had in mind in the first place.

But, wait, you're thinking: how can you get a nice creamy bokeh when shooting at f/14 or f/22? Something many people tend to forget is that the closer one approaches the subject with a macro lens the more the background naturally falls away and slides into bokeh.....
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Any aperture smaller than f/11 will lead to diffraction and loss of acuity.

True. However, it's rarely noticeable, especially when displaying it in such small image files that most people use when sharing their images.

If I have the option of capturing the subject the way I want it displayed with regard to exposure and depth of field and if I have no practical option to use focus stacking, I'll always make diffraction and lack of acuity my least most important concerns.

That's similar to the decision of whether to bump up ISO enough to stop the action or hold the camera still enough to render a sharply focused image even though some noise might be displayed; I would rather get the image sharp (when sharpness is required) than get it unsharp regardless of the compromises I need to accept to make that happen.
 
Joined
May 18, 2005
Messages
11,010
Location
Western Slope of Colorado
My daughter and I are beginner macro photographers = the way I got into this is a long story. I'm going to post a photo just to get the ball rolling. The weather
conditions was very windy, cloudy, and muddy.
D500, 105mm macro, f-stop 3.2, aperture priority mode, my shutter speed and my ISO are both where
I failed - and I knew better. I had dark glasses on due to eye issues. Lesson learned for sure.
View attachment 1681002
Dianne -

Shallow depth of field and, especially, *wind* surely are not one's friends when trying to shoot macro outdoors. You've had some great recommendations from others here at the Café. Maybe think about opening up a cardboard box, or something similar as a wind shield outside? If it might be possible for you, using a tripod can also help with the critical focusing needed to get that desired shot that achieves what you are seeking, either indoors or out.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
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Hong Kong
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Phil
many good advices above and I am not going to repeat. Just take it easy and take more shots with the suggested settings and you will improve as time goes by.
 

JLH

Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
211
Macro requires some practice, actually lots of it! Details become much more important when you are working with something so close. Depth of field is critical and requires a lot of consideration, as others have pointed out. Even the slightest movement will be harmful so one needs to take extra precautions. Others have made many good points. I would only echo the fact that macro is a challenge and requires patience and a lot of practice. But...its fun learning, just don't be hard on yourself in the beginning.
 
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Messages
6,732
Location
Sandpoint, Idaho
I use live view for a lot of flower photography. Bring the image up in live view, hit that + button until it's blown up enough to be useful and manually focus. I find it useful in calm conditions. One of these days I'll get around to trying focus stacking, it's one of the reasons I bought a D850. I wanted to get away from that macro rail, which I didn't have much fun using.
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
20,039
Location
TX originally from Louisiana
Thanks everyone! Mariam has figured out live view on her camera. You can be sure we're gonna practice like crazy. I have to justify my buying the lens all over - originally bought for a class that I've been "kicked" out of due to my opinions about wearing a mask
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
20,039
Location
TX originally from Louisiana
I thought I remembered you having bought a 105mm macro lens last year! You don't still have that lens, then? I had thought maybe Mariam would be sharing your lenses but if you no longer have that macro lens it makes sense to me now that she purchased one the other day.
Oh I still have it! I was supposed to use it in the class that I was supposed to take.
 
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
891
Location
SF Bay Area, California, USA
I discovered the 4-way macro rail. L-R and F-B.
I can move the camera just a bit (couple of inches) without having to move and reposition the tripod.

At macro distances, I CANNOT hand hold the camera still enough.
So, I NEED to use a tripod.

Each time you go out and shoot, you learn.
Keep track of the issues/problems, and the solutions, so you don't have those problems again.
 
Ah, Dianne, OK..... That makes sense that each of you would want to have your own macro lens while shooting together in a situation which offers opportunities for going macro, and of course you are not always going to be together in any given situation anyway.

I have never used a macro rail but I can definitely see how valuable it could be. I am bad about using the tripod, too, though, when it comes to shooting macro..... I try to stabilize the camera/lens while shooting but that is not always possible and I see the results when I review my images in the computer later.
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
20,039
Location
TX originally from Louisiana
I discovered the 4-way macro rail. L-R and F-B.
I can move the camera just a bit (couple of inches) without having to move and reposition the tripod.

At macro distances, I CANNOT hand hold the camera still enough.
So, I NEED to use a tripod.

Each time you go out and shoot, you learn.
Keep track of the issues/problems, and the solutions, so you don't have those problems again.
what is L-R and F-B?
 
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