What to shoot at a night football game

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR' started by dwind, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. dwind

    dwind Guest

    lens possibilities
    70 - 200, 70 300 vr, 300 f4, 1.4 adapter
    cameras
    d300 d700
    I'm kinda leaning towards the d700 with the 70 200 but the d300 will give the extra oomph. The lighting isn't the greatest

    Thanks
    Dennis
     
  2. iLLMaCK

    iLLMaCK Guest

    There are lots of threads on football settings...

    D300, 70-200 f/2.8

    Which game are you shooting?
     
  3. dwind

    dwind Guest

    It's a local high school game, actually I'll be taking pictures of the band at half time as my step son and daughter are in it.
     
  4. I was curious about this as well. I am getting a field pass from our school newspaper to go out and shoot Georgia Tech vs. Miss St in a few weeks.

    I have a D300 and 80-200 f/2.8
    I was thinking about renting either a 200-400 or a 300 f/2.8
    I also have a 2x extender.

    Any thoughts?
     
  5. iLLMaCK

    iLLMaCK Guest

    Day game? 200-400 would be ok
    Night game? 300 f/2.8 all the way

    but, an expensive rental for one game
     
  6. dwind

    dwind Guest

    I agree illMack - I used the d300 with the 70 - 200 2.8 + a 1.4 and it was only soso.
    Next game will be the 70 - 200 2.8 with no 1.4. I've got a 300 2.8 but it's ai. Hmm, maybe I'll try it anyway.
     
  7. NateD

    NateD Guest

    When I shot with my D200, I would have a 300 f/2.8 on one body and a 80-200 f/2.8 on the other. I shot last night with the 300 on the D300 (I can rent it for $40.00) and my 80-200 on the D200 and I was very satisfied with the results....
     
  8. dking99

    dking99

    644
    Aug 19, 2008
    Rockville, MD
    ABSOLUTELY shoot with the D700 and ABSOLUTELY shoot with the 70-200 VR with no 1.4TC.

    Shutter speed will be key here. So will aperture, but I think we all know the relationship between the two when it comes to exposure. Shoot at f2.8 at all times when it comes to HS football...especially if it is dark outside. Crank ISO up to 3200.

    You will need at least 1/125 to get any sharp images. Even with a monopod (which is highly recommended) you need at least that. 1/200 would be my aim before I thought about adding a 1.4TC. If you can get higher than 1/200, then add the 1.4TC, otherwise forget it.

    You cant fix blurry images (due to slow shutter speeds) in photoshop...so get it right with a fast shutter speed.
     
  9. wgilles

    wgilles

    Apr 25, 2008
    NJ

    That's some good advice right there!
     
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