What WB should I use for landscapes?

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A noob question but how do you guys usually set white balance for landscapes? I've always left my camera in auto WB outdoors, but should I be using daylight WB?

Even though I shoot in raw, adjusting WB is something I never think to change in Capture NX2 (which I'm still a noob at), but after going back to old photos it seems to affect landscape colors quite a bit if I pick daylight instead of Auto.
 
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If you know it is Daylight, why not simply say so? The Auto modes have to guess and try to figure something out. There is nothing dumber than a dumb computer. :smile:

Daylight of course also includes cloudy and shade, which are different situations (which matter).

And also there is personal preference. Some people prefer to set Cloudy when in bright sun, for a bit warmer tone.

The beauty of RAW is that we can sit there and try several things, and get it just like we want it.
 
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Try getting into using the K setting.

Daylight (according to NIkon) is 5200K - I have been using that for as long as I can remember.

In my RAW Converter I then note what K setting best suited the conditions I was was shooting in. I try to remember that the next time I'm shooting in those conditions making "correct" in-camera shooting easier.

Shooting in RAW "CAN" make a better Digital Photographer of you if you're willing to put in the work.

DG
 
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Try getting into using the K setting.

Daylight (according to NIkon) is 5200K - I have been using that for as long as I can remember.

In my RAW Converter I then note what K setting best suited the conditions I was was shooting in. I try to remember that the next time I'm shooting in those conditions making "correct" in-camera shooting easier.

Shooting in RAW "CAN" make a better Digital Photographer of you if you're willing to put in the work.

DG

My D50 doesn't have K settings but will try to do that when I get a new body.

In Capture NX2, is there a way to see what K value the camera used in Auto WB? It's grayed out - would be nice to know.

Looking through a lot of my shots, auto WB seems to match daylight well, except in shots with a lot of yellow, then Auto seems to reduce the yellow too much.
 
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I leave it at Auto or UniWB and adjust in Photoshop. Even if I set it for daylight on a nice day, I would still be adjusting it later/anyway.
 
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Chris,

That's one of the MAIN reasons for using a K value.

It displays the K value used and allows adjustments used via the presets to be made more easily (also Batching).

If you don't have K values use Daylight or Flash in-camera - at least you know that they are 5200K.

DG
 
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For landscape, I just leave the WB at Auto and shoot RAW, it can be edited easily if it needed to in PS
 
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If you use auto white balance for landscapes every frame can end up with a slightly different white balance, even if the light has not changed. This can lead to issues, especially if bracketing for HDR or for stitching panos. Therefore, it's better to use one of the preset white balance settings (daylight, cloudy, etc) or specify a Kelvin setting and then alter it in post if need be. For sunsets and the like try the daylight white balance preset as AWB will typically end up being too cool.
 
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If you use auto white balance for landscapes every frame can end up with a slightly different white balance, even if the light has not changed. This can lead to issues, especially if bracketing for HDR or for stitching panos. Therefore, it's better to use one of the preset white balance settings (daylight, cloudy, etc) or specify a Kelvin setting and then alter it in post if need be. For sunsets and the like try the daylight white balance preset as AWB will typically end up being too cool.

Thanks, I was gonna ask this but maybe you answered it - does Auto WB use in between temp numbers, or does it just choose daylight (5200K), cloudy (6000K) etc? Sounds like the former.
 
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Yes, it will pick a specific color temp for WB and not simply a preset such as daylight, cloudy or shade, etc.

Edit to add: I should also mention that, depending on the camera, you may have the ability to fine tune the WB on two axes: blue/amber and green/magenta. Thus if a preset, for example cloudy, is too warm, you can cool it slightly using the blue/amber axis. This ability offers a finer level of control than even setting WB directly using the Kelvin scale.
 
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Use sunlight or 5200K. Why allow the camera a chance to error.

If you do shade or cloudy, change appropriately.

I just use raw and repair small errors later. AWB is a big NO for me.
 
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I usually set mine to "cloudy" even at high noon on a cloudless day. I think the default sunny daylight setting looks too blue and the cloudy setting gets me closer to where I want to start. If I then wind up with it too warm, I can cool it back off in NX2.
 
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griz8791 said:
I think the default sunny daylight setting looks too blue

That is partially due to the fact Nikon uses 5200K for their daylight WB preset. Whereas 5500-5600K is often better.

Remember, the Kelvin temperature (or preset WB) that you set in the camera represents the color temperature of the ambient light. For example, if something is very warm, such as a tungsten lightbulb, you may choose a WB of 2800K in the camera. However, that 2800K being the color temperature of the ambient light is not in fact what the camera is using. The camera is in fact using a much cooler (blue) WB in order to compensate for the warm light, thus balancing the two.

Hence, when you select the daylight WB preset of 5200K the cameras compensation is often not red enough to balance the blue daylight and the image appears to be too blue. In other words, the camera may need to use 2700K (warmer) in order to balance the 5600K daylight, but instead it's using 2900K (not warm enough). And again, the image is too blue.
 
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That is partially due to the fact Nikon uses 5200K for their daylight WB preset. Whereas 5500-5600K is often better.

Remember, the Kelvin temperature (or preset WB) that you set in the camera represents the color temperature of the ambient light. For example, if something is very warm, such as a tungsten lightbulb, you may choose a WB of 2800K in the camera. However, that 2800K being the color temperature of the ambient light is not in fact what the camera is using. The camera is in fact using a much cooler (blue) WB in order to compensate for the warm light, thus balancing the two.

Hence, when you select the daylight WB preset of 5200K the cameras compensation is often not red enough to balance the blue daylight and the image appears to be too blue. In other words, the camera may need to use 2700K (warmer) in order to balance the 5600K daylight, but instead it's using 2900K (not warm enough). And again, the image is too blue.

"It was my understanding, there would be no math . . ."

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