When Your Dog Has A Bad Day...

Joined
Nov 11, 2005
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5,270
Location
Houston, TX
... you gotta find a repair man for your partially destroyed Persian rug. This is the pictorial journey of the repair over the following 2 months.

Once the destroyed bits have been cut out, the warp and woof of the rug needs to be replaced.

RugRepair-Reconstruction-Of-Warp-and-Woof-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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Next there are thousands of knots to attach the wool to the warp and woof, copying the size of pattern and colors of the undamaged portion of the rug.

RugRepair-Knot-Work-Closeup-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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These are some of the tools used.

RugRepair-Tools-For-The-Job-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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These will eventually become the new tassels for the damaged portion, once all the wool has been knotted to the warp and woof.

RugRepair-New-Tassels-In-The-Making-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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The vertical strings (warp?) are all done first and the long bits at the top will eventually become the new tassels. The horizontal strings (woof?) are added one at a time after the wool is knotted onto the warp strings (I don't know if wool is also knotted to the woof strings). After a row is knotted, it is pounded down with the fan-shaped tool to pack it as tight as possible to the previous row.

RugRepair-Getting-Ready-For-Wool-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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After the tedium of adding rows of woof and knots, the new tassels can be finished off, knotted for stability and cut to length.

RugRepair-Cutting-New-Fringe-To-Length-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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The floor side of the repair is almost identical to the of the undamaged rug. This craftsman has excellent color matching skills, but here in Houston he found all the colors of wool necessary, but for one, as it is virtually impossible to match our aniline dyed wool with colors from the other side of the world (Iran) - most likely vegetable dyes.

RugRepair-Floor-Side-Of-Reweave-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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This is the completed floor side of the repair. An amazing job of color matching, pattern matching and knot density.

RugRepair-Completed-Floor-Side-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150 1.jpg
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The last step of the repair is to comb out the wool and cutting it's length to match the original. This is the first cut, but unfortunately I missed the second final cut because the owner was in a rush to get it home for a party.

RugRepair-Cutting-Wool-Topside-To-Length-JPEG-Long1200-8bit-SRGB-150.jpg
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This repair occurred in the same antique pavilion as was Monica's shop, so I was able to follow the repair job from start to finish. It took 2 months of Sundays during April and May of 2006.

It is my understanding the dog was still alive when the repaired carpet was returned home; even though the rug was expensive initially and the repair likewise.

My photo story has been 14 years in the making - I appologize to all.
 
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Butlerkid

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WOW! Amazing! I didn't realize such repairs were even possible! The photos and story are exceptionally well done!

How timely you posted this! We have a puppy - now 9 months old. And several very large and expensive wool and wool/silk rugs. Unfortunately our puppy loves to chew......EVERYTHING! LOL! He has chewed corners of our beautiful wood baseboards. We have numerous irreplaceable antiques....so far he has not damaged those. And more than once I have found him interested in our rugs! LOL! So far they have escaped any damage!
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
671
Location
MN, USA
WOW! Amazing! I didn't realize such repairs were even possible! The photos and story are exceptionally well done!

How timely you posted this! We have a puppy - now 9 months old. And several very large and expensive wool and wool/silk rugs. Unfortunately our puppy loves to chew......EVERYTHING! LOL! He has chewed corners of our beautiful wood baseboards. We have numerous irreplaceable antiques....so far he has not damaged those. And more than once I have found him interested in our rugs! LOL! So far they have escaped any damage!
Bitter Apple spray always worked for us. That plus giving them something acceptable to chew. My vet told me that puppy brains release endorphins when they chew so they are basically little dope fiends.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
5,270
Location
Houston, TX
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Hey B‘kid,
You might think differently about puppy damage to a silk&wool rug considering they approach 200 knots/inch! The damage to rug damage in this story was about 16x8 inches at about 40 knots per inch and it took an expert about 10 working days to do the repair. If I had anything like a wool&silk blend rug, I would roll it up and put in an off-site storage unit until the dog was at least 3 years, just sayin’😉
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Messages
33,298
Location
St. George, Utah
Your pictorial story was so interesting. To see the completed work makes one appreciate the craftsmanship that goes into this beautiful rug. The fact that the dog is still alive says a lot about the kindness of the owner.
 
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