Which Z6 lens combo for travelling? How about the Z 14-30 with the AF-S 18-300 VRii?

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Sep 2, 2019
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I am sure Nikon 1 can be found in S/h market.
For compact and high quality maybe Ricoh GR, it is APS-C sensor with fixed 28mm equivalent lens or Nikon equivalent, A1 I think it was called, discontinued, 28mm is good travelling lens, think Leica Q on the cheap.
I'm just guessing from your context, but are you just going to be shooting jpeg?
Don't know yet. I want to learn and experiment. Maybe the Nikon 1 is the best fit for me, but I want to try everything that a sophisticated camera can do. I'll read instructions and tutorials until I understand what the skilled photographers are doing. Then I might default to leaving everything on auto and taking the usual tourist snaps. Or I might do the opposite. I will have plenty of time, which I think is probably the key.

eta: My long cycling trips are nothing like yer average working man's holiday. I'm not on the beach with demanding children, trying to cram some relaxation into a fortnight. I'm lying around at a hostel or camp site with hours to spare.
 
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Don't know yet. I want to learn and experiment. Maybe the Nikon 1 is the best fit for me, but I want to try everything that a sophisticated camera can do. I'll read instructions and tutorials until I understand what the skilled photographers are doing. Then I might default to leaving everything on auto and taking the usual tourist snaps. Or I might do the opposite. I will have plenty of time, which I think is probably the key.
I would really avoid buying a Nikon 1 series IMO. While small, they're no longer being developed by Nikon, the 1" sensor lags behind the 20MP sensor in the newest m43 cameras, and the lenses weren't particularly exciting.

If you plan on using the camera after your trip, you're better off buying something that you'll use long-term (like a Z6). However, if you don't foresee yourself shooting much after your trip, then you'll want to minimize your investment (and loss when it comes time to sell the gear).

I shot with m43 before moving to Nikon, and while the Nikon system is better in some regards, it wasn't a huge leap in terms of IQ. If you're going to be shooting in good light for the most part and don't plan on doing much continuous AF/tracking, then a m43 camera will do just fine. The below images were all shot with a 20MP Olympus E-M1 II when my wife and I went to Hawaii last year. It doesn’t have quite the same dynamic range as a Z6, but it’s far from terrible, and cameras/lenses can be picked is used and in great condition for a steal, and then be sold at a later date without too much money being lost due to the depreciation having already occurred.

EDIT: wow, there is some crazy over-sharpening that is being applied to these images when I upload them here. They don't look nearly this crunchy on my phone or my computer at home. Ignore the over sharpening that is seen, but these should give you an example of what you can shoot with a m43 camera with a "tiny sensor". Not bad at all IMO.

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Wow, beautiful pics!
Thank you. If you're interested in a m43 camera, I would really suggest looking at an Olympus E-M1 II, Panasonic G9 or Panasonic GX9. All three have very good 20MP sensors. The E-M1 II and G9 are weather sealed (but you have to use weather sealed lenses as well).

As far as the lenses go, I would look to go with a Panasonic Leica 8-18mm f/2.8-4, and either a Panasonic Leica 12-60 f/2.8-4 or Olympus 12-100 f/4.

Here's a shot of my E-M1 II and Panasonic Leica 8-18 after being inside of a very windy cloud on top of Haleakala one morning for sunrise. The camera/lens were dripping wet, but kept on working like a champ.

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I want to try everything that a sophisticated camera can do.
the Nikon system is better in some regards, it wasn't a huge leap in terms of IQ. If you're going to be shooting in good light for the most part and don't plan on doing much continuous AF/tracking, then a m43 camera will do just fine.
These two considerations sum up this complex decision quite well. Ian and I migrated from micro 4/3 to the Z6 st about the same time. As he mentions, staying a generation behind the leading edge in micro 4/3 will minimize the cost of your “one-year rental” in the event you later decide to upgrade to FF.

During that time, I expect CaNikonSony mirrorless technology will evolve further, and you’d be able to benefit either from those improvements or the reduction in price of current generation FF bodies.
 
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I've done a weight comparison between the Z6 and the M1 Mark ii. Pls tell me if it's reasonable.

Z6 body, battery and card 675g
Z 24-70mm f/4 500
Ftz adapter 135
AF-P 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E VR 680
Total 1990

M1 body, battery and card 574
12-40 f/2.8 382
40-150 f/2.8 760
Total 1716

Or M1 with just the 12‑100 f/4 561
Total 1135
I've used all of the above on major overseas and domestic trips.

I'm in the camp with Andy and Ian above, having migrated from m43 to a Z. There are differences between M43 and FF, but for general travel photography both are capable of producing fine, detailed, interesting images. Good technique and knowledge of the craft will make far more difference than which of the two above systems you use.

Nikon 1 is a fun camera (and yes I've shot that as well) but I'd avoid it for the reasons mentioned above.
 
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Sep 2, 2019
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These two considerations sum up this complex decision quite well. Ian and I migrated from micro 4/3 to the Z6 st about the same time. As he mentions, staying a generation behind the leading edge in micro 4/3 will minimize the cost of your “one-year rental” in the event you later decide to upgrade to FF.

During that time, I expect CaNikonSony mirrorless technology will evolve further, and you’d be able to benefit either from those improvements or the reduction in price of current generation FF bodies.
I'm good at buying but hopeless at selling. Just remembered I've got a Pentax K-r in a drawer. :oops: And an LX. :rolleyes:
 

j t

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Sep 9, 2019
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3
I bring my Z6 on bike rides sometimes. I don't think I would bring it on a long tour.

The camera and extra lens is quite bulky. I carry it in an Arkel TailRider rack top bag. Just the camera and one lens takes up 2/3 of the bag.

The Z6 is more for considered, composed photos. It really rewards getting the settings correct, and spending time on composition. I have to stop, take the camera out, compose, and shoot. I've often had poor results when I did a quick stop, grabbed the camera, and rushed the shots. Carrying it in a trunk bag, I have to decide: should I stop, get off the bike, pull out the camera, and shoot? I probably miss some good shots where I didn't want to stop. Perhaps it all fits in one of the touring front bags that attach to a permanent fitting on the handlebars.

I looked for effective ways to carry the camera on a strap system, but the way cyclists lean forward makes it difficult.

I do like going on bike rides with it, but I expect to spend maybe half the time with the camera, half riding.

A smaller, weatherproof camera with a built-in zoom would be quicker for documenting the trip. It could easily be carried in a front bag, accessible even while riding along.

I used to bring a Panasonic LX100, with a 4/3 sensor, slightly cropped, in a tiny body. 24-75 built-in zoom. It was easy to grab out of a front bag pocket, and I could carry it around all day. I got a lot of very nice photos -- the raw files had decent dynamic range. Downsides: it's not weatherproof. And the telescoping lens draws dust into the sensor eventually, and it's very expensive to have cleaned. (It's sitting on a shelf, I don't think it's worth fixing.)

Lens choice
The 14-30 can make some very interesting images, wide, sweeping views. But the times I have ridden with just that lens, it's not always the best choice. I have to get very close to foreground subjects. The 24-70 is a better choice. That could be enough. The 70-300 makes very good images, but it's fairly large for a bike touring trip.
 
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