Windows 10 on iMac

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I have been exclusively an Apple computer user for about 10 years now and no longer have a Windows machine.

I am getting new hearing aids soon and would like to consider programming them myself. But the fitting software for my brand of hearing aids only runs on Windows 10.

What would be the most cost-effective way for me to get that now?

When I got my first iMac I used a virtual machine to run both Windows & and Linux but I can't remember which one.
 
Huh...... Back in October I got new hearing aids -- different from what most people use, as they are bone-anchored sound processors -- but they are digital and do cool things way beyond what my previous aids did. Isn't the new technology amazing? I am loving that with my iPhone I can actually adjust the volume, play/stream my music via iTunes right into my sound processors, etc. Interestingly, as of now, apparently the "BAHA-Smart" app for consumers only works with the iPhone, not with Android devices.

Although there is some consumer-level "programming" ability available (shifting from speech to music for example) with that app, for the most part at my "activation" appointment the audiologist did the major fine-tuning with device-specific fitting software that she had available in her office computer to make sure that each of the sound processors actually met my needs and that they properly paired as well. As someone who was born with hearing loss right from the get-go, I have always preferred to utilize the expertise and knowledge of someone who is trained on the product -- in this case, not just the software itself, but also with the whole field of audiology in general and hearing levels, causes of hearing loss, etc., etc. -- in other words, an Aud. D., someone with a doctorate in audiology who is trained and who really knows what they are doing. Many audiologists work together with an ENT or a clinic to diagnose and work with patients to help them get the level of hearing that they need. Just as I don't cheap out with dealing with managing vision issues, I don't cheap out with managing hearing issues either. Both of these are very important senses and losing or having them impaired really does require appropriately trained people (ophthalmologist, audiologist) to provide the best possible situation for everyday functionality as is available.

Don't just go to Costco or some outfit like that, give yourself the benefit of getting an accurate hearing evaluation and an accurate hearing experience with aids that are programmed specifically to your needs by someone who actually knows what they are doing. Don't just try to do this yourself. How much do you know about audiology? And, yes, I am aware that most people with age-related hearing loss do not have the benefit of insurance coverage for their hearing needs, which is really unfortunate. Hearing aids are not inexpensive, nor is the proper determination of what is needed in the first place and also provided and programmed.....
 
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Growltiger

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I think that the programming will be transmitted to the aids using bluetooth. So be careful to check that the virtual environment is capable of using the bluetooth device in the computer. And you need to check the exact bluetooth version that is needed. For example you may need support for version 4.2 LE.

I don't know how much you have investigated this but I think you will find the aids will use the LE version of the standard. LE means low energy, they use it so as to use as little battery power as possible. The hardware interface will be used not just for programming but for the user to interface to phones, media devices, tablets, computers etc.

It is very good to be able to sit at a computer with the room in silence, with no headphones, with the computer audio playing directly into the ears via the aids.

Apple have been far ahead of Microsoft in their support for aids by mobile devices (iPhones and iPads in their case). Google only published standards last year for aid manufacturers to conform to and it will take years to get them all on board.

Signia have a special device that provides the interface between normal bluetooth on a device and the exact LE version needed by their aids. So their aids (some models anyway) can work with any type of computer.

As you can see this is a complex subject. It took me some time to get even my beginner level understanding. I have a feeling that you will need to use an actual PC for this task. Good luck.
 
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Growltiger

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Huh...... Back in October I got new hearing aids -- different from what most people use, as they are bone-anchored sound processors -- but they are digital and do cool things way beyond what my previous aids did. Isn't the new technology amazing? I am loving that with my iPhone I can actually adjust the volume, play/stream my music via iTunes right into my sound processors, etc. Interestingly, as of now, apparently the "BAHA-Smart" app for consumers only works with the iPhone, not with Android devices.
Connie, I was very impressed by what Apple have done with getting all the hearing aid manufacturers to work with their standard so that iPhones and iPads can be used easily with them. But one thing I never managed to find out was whether that also applies to Macs. Can you listen to your Mac using your aids? Or perhaps there is a way where the iPhone somehow connects the Mac to the aids? I would be interested to understand this.
 
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I have been exclusively an Apple computer user for about 10 years now and no longer have a Windows machine.

I am getting new hearing aids soon and would like to consider programming them myself. But the fitting software for my brand of hearing aids only runs on Windows 10.

What would be the most cost-effective way for me to get that now?

When I got my first iMac I used a virtual machine to run both Windows & and Linux but I can't remember which one.
I use Parallels. There are others. FWIW, I've had success using "system builder" versions of Windows to install in the virtual machine.
 
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I thanks, Doug. I now remember it was VMWare Fusion I ran before. I'll look into Parallels.
Ironically, my new hearing aids have an Apple app but not Windows. I originally sorted through all the virtualization tools over a decade ago. I picked Parallels because it was the simplest to install and configure. Lots has changed but I've stuck with Parallels because... well, because of familiarity. I like their "Coherence" mode where the VM disappears. Running windows app show up in the Mac OS dock and the Windows menu (and shared devices and more) can be access via icons on the toolbar.
 
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I thanks, Doug. I now remember it was VMWare Fusion I ran before. I'll look into Parallels.
I ran parallels and Windows 10 on my 2015 imac for three years. It worked fine for me to run the Windows software that I needed to run for work, but I felt like it really did slow down my machine. I finally bought a Windows laptop to use for work and got Parallels off of my imac. I haven't missed it a bit. Will this be a one time programming operation? If so, I wonder if someone has a Windows 10 laptop that you could borrow. If it is something you will do on a regular basis, then it is a different story.
 

Growltiger

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Ironically, my new hearing aids have an Apple app but not Windows. I originally sorted through all the virtualization tools over a decade ago. I picked Parallels because it was the simplest to install and configure. Lots has changed but I've stuck with Parallels because... well, because of familiarity. I like their "Coherence" mode where the VM disappears. Running windows app show up in the Mac OS dock and the Windows menu (and shared devices and more) can be access via icons on the toolbar.
I think you mean "but not Android". The emphasis has been on phone integration with aids. Some manufacturers do have Android apps to control the aids, but as I mentioned above Apple are far ahead on this with their iOS app.
 
Connie, I was very impressed by what Apple have done with getting all the hearing aid manufacturers to work with their standard so that iPhones and iPads can be used easily with them. But one thing I never managed to find out was whether that also applies to Macs. Can you listen to your Mac using your aids? Or perhaps there is a way where the iPhone somehow connects the Mac to the aids? I would be interested to understand this.
Apple has really been on the cusp of providing accessibility for people with vision impairment and hearing impairment. Yes, the app works with iOS devices. There is also a device called the mini-mic made by Resound and also relabeled for Cochlear/BAHA recipients which can plug directly into my MBP and which would then transmit sound directly via BT to my BAHAs. I have to admit that although I've had this and also the similarly-configured doohickey for the television since October, I haven't gotten around to setting either system up. I don't watch TV all that much so not a big deal there, and for my MBP I have a very nice set of bone-conduction headphones which works very well. Most of the time I can simply enjoy music or a video from my MBP with just wearing my aids by themselves, but when I really want intensity and greater depth of sound, I plug in the headphones and that works well for me. My hearing loss is primarily conductive, which is different from those who deal with age-related hearing loss, Sensorineural hearing loss, Tinnitus or other conditions. Of course the older I get there is also going to be that age-related loss as well, resulting in more of a mixed-hearing loss. We are all so fortunate to be living in a world where there is so much technology (which is ever-developing) to make life a little easier and manageable for those with various vision or hearing issues.
 
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Huh...... Back in October I got new hearing aids -- different from what most people use, as they are bone-anchored sound processors -- but they are digital and do cool things way beyond what my previous aids did. Isn't the new technology amazing? I am loving that with my iPhone I can actually adjust the volume, play/stream my music via iTunes right into my sound processors, etc. Interestingly, as of now, apparently the "BAHA-Smart" app for consumers only works with the iPhone, not with Android devices.

Although there is some consumer-level "programming" ability available (shifting from speech to music for example) with that app, for the most part at my "activation" appointment the audiologist did the major fine-tuning with device-specific fitting software that she had available in her office computer to make sure that each of the sound processors actually met my needs and that they properly paired as well. As someone who was born with hearing loss right from the get-go, I have always preferred to utilize the expertise and knowledge of someone who is trained on the product -- in this case, not just the software itself, but also with the whole field of audiology in general and hearing levels, causes of hearing loss, etc., etc. -- in other words, an Aud. D., someone with a doctorate in audiology who is trained and who really knows what they are doing. Many audiologists work together with an ENT or a clinic to diagnose and work with patients to help them get the level of hearing that they need. Just as I don't cheap out with dealing with managing vision issues, I don't cheap out with managing hearing issues either. Both of these are very important senses and losing or having them impaired really does require appropriately trained people (ophthalmologist, audiologist) to provide the best possible situation for everyday functionality as is available.

Don't just go to Costco or some outfit like that, give yourself the benefit of getting an accurate hearing evaluation and an accurate hearing experience with aids that are programmed specifically to your needs by someone who actually knows what they are doing. Don't just try to do this yourself. How much do you know about audiology? And, yes, I am aware that most people with age-related hearing loss do not have the benefit of insurance coverage for their hearing needs, which is really unfortunate. Hearing aids are not inexpensive, nor is the proper determination of what is needed in the first place and also provided and programmed.....
Connie, I was very impressed by what Apple have done with getting all the hearing aid manufacturers to work with their standard so that iPhones and iPads can be used easily with them. But one thing I never managed to find out was whether that also applies to Macs. Can you listen to your Mac using your aids? Or perhaps there is a way where the iPhone somehow connects the Mac to the aids? I would be interested to understand this.
I have been using hearing aids since 1981 so I am very familiar with them and have gone through many aids and several different brands. My audiologist for the past 20 years is a former professor of audiology who broke and away and started his own hearing aid service.

I'm going to get Phonak Marvel M70 aids. Their bluetooth technology is the only one that will work with both iPhone and Android. It will also stream TV sound to my hearing aids (with an included attachment), telephone conversations, my computer...essentially any bluetooth device. And it does it in stereo. It will connect to two BT devices at once.

I'm interested in programming my own hearing aids not to save money as my audiologist doesn't charge for that. I just want to be able to make my own custom settings in a realistic environment. When I go to the audiologist's office I can only test the new settings against his voice in his very quiet office environment.
 
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I have been using hearing aids since 1981 so I am very familiar with them and have gone through many aids and several different brands. My audiologist for the past 20 years is a former professor of audiology who broke and away and started his own hearing aid service.

I'm going to get Phonak Marvel M70 aids. Their bluetooth technology is the only one that will work with both iPhone and Android. It will also stream TV sound to my hearing aids (with an included attachment), telephone conversations, my computer...essentially any bluetooth device. And it does it in stereo. It will connect to two BT devices at once.

I'm interested in programming my own hearing aids not to save money as my audiologist doesn't charge for that. I just want to be able to make my own custom settings in a realistic environment. When I go to the audiologist's office I can only test the new settings against his voice in his very quiet office environment.
I don't know anything about hearing aids, but suspect I will eventually need them. This is an interesting conversation to learn about all the wonderful technology that is available. I seems to me that it would be really helpful if you could learn to program them yourself. Will you be able to change settings while you are on the go to match the environment you are in?
 
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I ran parallels and Windows 10 on my 2015 imac for three years. It worked fine for me to run the Windows software that I needed to run for work, but I felt like it really did slow down my machine. I finally bought a Windows laptop to use for work and got Parallels off of my imac. I haven't missed it a bit. Will this be a one time programming operation? If so, I wonder if someone has a Windows 10 laptop that you could borrow. If it is something you will do on a regular basis, then it is a different story.
Thanks, Terri. I expect I would need to use this software several times over a few months until I get the settings set and then not anymore for a long time, if ever.
 
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I don't know anything about hearing aids, but suspect I will eventually need them. This is an interesting conversation to learn about all the wonderful technology that is available. I seems to me that it would be really helpful if you could learn to program them yourself. Will you be able to change settings while you are on the go to match the environment you are in?
Depends on the manufacturer and model. I can adjust mine anytime with the iOS app. But the interface is pretty crude and you have to, essentially, create a new equalization map to replace one of the existing ones. You can't just tweak a couple of frequency bands. Other brands may offer this ability.
 
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I don't know anything about hearing aids, but suspect I will eventually need them. This is an interesting conversation to learn about all the wonderful technology that is available. I seems to me that it would be really helpful if you could learn to program them yourself. Will you be able to change settings while you are on the go to match the environment you are in?
The iPhone app lets me change many settings including volume, bass, treble, midrange, and some of the built-in programs like Music, Noise, sound focus, etc. But the fundamental frequency response curve is set by the audiologist.

To do my own programming I will have to buy a bluetooth interface device for my computer in addition the software. And I will need a Windows 10 computer. So I'm not committed to that course of action yet... just investigating.

There is a Hearing Aid forum much like the Nikon Cafe and quite a few members there have reported great success in doing their own programming.
 
I have been using hearing aids since 1981 so I am very familiar with them and have gone through many aids and several different brands. My audiologist for the past 20 years is a former professor of audiology who broke and away and started his own hearing aid service.

I'm going to get Phonak Marvel M70 aids. Their bluetooth technology is the only one that will work with both iPhone and Android. It will also stream TV sound to my hearing aids (with an included attachment), telephone conversations, my computer...essentially any bluetooth device. And it does it in stereo. It will connect to two BT devices at once.

I'm interested in programming my own hearing aids not to save money as my audiologist doesn't charge for that. I just want to be able to make my own custom settings in a realistic environment. When I go to the audiologist's office I can only test the new settings against his voice in his very quiet office environment.
Phonak is a good brand! Through the years prior to when I got the bone-anchored sound processors I have worn Sonotone, Phonak and Oticon and all of them were excellent. The reason I wrote what I did is because I have seen on another forum where people have just gone to their local Costco and gotten whatever service and devices were available there.....

You are SO going to love the whole experience of having music, TV, whatever, streamed right into your hearing aids! Blew me away the first time I experienced it..... I was thrilled because at last I could be listening to music while puttering around the house at home and then decide to go out to the mailbox kiosk and no need to stop enjoying the music, I could just tuck the iPhone into my pocket and off I went.... Mind-blowing!

Yes, if one wears two aids, they can be paired and therefore work together. It is just really cool, this whole thing! That makes sense that you would want to work with your own custom settings in a realistic environment, as yes, an audiologist's office doesn't exactly replicate the kind of listening environment one experiences in a concert hall! Or, in a noisy restaurant, family gathering or party situation...... As I mentioned, my app does provide the ability for the consumer to do some fine-tuning, too, but the devices I've got don't have a lot of different programs, probably because at this point I don't need the more powerful and extensive versions.... I do know that there are settings for music, for speech, for other situations, but my devices don't offer that and so far I have not felt a need to make adjustments. It's still weird to me that I don't have to always be fiddling with the volume controls the way I had done for years and and years!
 

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